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ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 



^^^^^^^^^^ AT 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII NOVEMBER 15, 1929 No. 1 



IMPRESSED WITH SOLOMON'S WISDOM. 



"And when the queen of Su ■ /oard the fame of Solomon concerning 
the name of the Lord, she came t, 4tf him with her questions. 

And she came to Jerusalem witu ' ? -v. v great train, with camels that 
bare spices, and very much gold, ana ^ 'is stones; and when she was 
come to Solomon, she communed with hi./-, '1 that was in her heart. 

And Solomon told her all her questions? 4 , was not anything hid 
from the king which he told her not. ''° 

And when the queen of Sheba had seen all Solomon's wisdom, and the 
house that he had built, 

And the meat of his table, and the sitting of his servants, and the at- 
tendance of his ministers, and their apparel, and his cupbearers, and his 
ascent by which he went up into the house of the Lord, there was no 
more spirit in her. 

And she said to the king, It was a true report that I heard in mine own 
land, of thy acts and of thy wisdom. 

Howbeit I believed not the words until I came, and mine eyes had seen 
it: and behold, the half was not told me: thy wisdom and prosperity ex- 
ceeded the fame which I heard, happy are thy men, happy are these thy 
servants, which stand continually before thee, and that hear thy wisdom. 

Blessed be the Lord thy God which delighteth in thee, to set thee on the 
throne of Israel; because the Lord loved Israel forever, therefore made 
he thee king, to do judgment and justice." — 1 Kings 10:1-9. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor - - - Winston, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT - - - - Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE - - - Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Zion *s 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber" desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Eton's Hanfcmarh 



5)evote£> to the Cause of 3esus Christ 



LOVE AND FELLOWSHIP. 

Oh ! thou kind and indulgent Lord, 
Who the path of sorrow has trod, 
Wading through tears, sweat and 
blood, 

To redeem a fallen race from sor- 
row. 

Many of our loved ones are far 
away, 

Yet there is a bright eternal day, 
Where we do hope to meet them 
again, 

Where all is love and peace and no 
pain. 

There with loved ones eternally to 
dwell, 

And never once hear the sad fare- 
well, 

But in love and union be complete, 
While Jesus smiles our souls to 
greet. 

While we sing His everlasting praise 
In harmony without end of days, 
All praise and adoration is due, 
His grand and glorious name. 

So dearly beloved let us endeavor, 
To keep His laws it will not sever, 
But will bind us closer together, 
In love, peace and sweet fellowship. 

Yours in hope, 

J. R. JONES, 

Greensboro, N. C. 

218992 



SCIENCE. 

What is Science? Let the late 
New Universities Dictionary tell us. 
Listen: Systematized knowledge of 
any one department of mind or mat- 
ter; acknowledge truths and laws, 
especially as demonstrated by in- 
duction, experiment, or observa- 
tion. 

What is knowledge? The same 
dictionary answers to the effect 
that it is clear perception of a truth 
or fact; erudition; skill from prac- 
tice; acquaintance; information. 
What is wisdom? The same auth- 
ority answers: Knowledge practi- 
cally applied to the best ends; na- 
tural sagacity; prudence; skill in 
affairs; piety. 

What is learning; Same author- 
ity answers: Skill in literature, lan- 
guage or science ; knowledge ac- 
quired. 

I might quote from many other 
sources, but even if I did it would 
not materially change the defini- 
tions just quoted. I could quote 
from Webster's Academic or Un- 
abridged, Funk and Wagnall's Desk 
Standard, and their large Standard 
Dictionary of the English Language, 
an immense work, costing $36.00, 
in which the definition of the word 
"Science," embraces more than 
common readers would like to 
peruse, and other reference works 
here ; but after all that is said about 
science, we may safely define it as 
the wisdom of men, the wisdom of 
this world in contradistinction to 
the wisdom of God, the wisdom 



2 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



which is from above etc. It is said 
Acts 7:22, that Moses was learned 
in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, 
that is as I understand it to mean: 
in all the science and art of the 
Egyptians. In what I write on this 
subject, I do not mean to utter an 
unkind or depreciative word against 
true science, oh no, for it is helpful 
to us in so many ways, and aspects, 
that the mind cannot conceive or 
tongue express it adequately, and 
yet science is not a god, it is not 
perfect, but like the source it comes 
from it is imperfect. 

We have lived to see the age, 
the time, the day, when infidels, 
agnostics, atheists and critics are 
rising up all over the civilized 
world and in the name of "Science" 
are attacking the Bible as the in- 
spired word of God, yes and even 
the transcendant and eternal God 
and His Divine Son, Jesus Christ, 
and slandering, persecuting and 
misrepresenting His church and 
people and had they the power they 
would doubtless hurl God from His 
throne, and exalt the devil. In the 
name of Evolution, or science they 
would do all this, claiming that all 
things come by evolution, defining 
evolution to be "Continuous pro- 
gressive change according to fixed 
laws, by means of resident forces, 
etc." 

The Evolutionists or scientists, 
falsely so called, are largely in the 
majority in the so-called scientific 
world and so claim that the science, 
intelligence and learning of the 
world is all on their side, but this 
claim is utterly false, for we are real 
glad to know and to so state that 
there are some of the true and 
ablest scientists of the world who 
contradict their teaching and dare 
to tell the people the truth about 



the matter. Philip Mauro, Supreme 
Court lawyer of international fame, 
author of many books, among them 
"Evolution at The Bar", on page 27 
remarks: "It should be pointed out, 
before entering upon this examina- 
tion that it is easy to impose upon 
the majority of people by an ap- 
peal to 'Science' as an authority. 
Thus we often hear it said, 'Science 
has discovered this,' or 'Science 
tells us that,' as if the matter were 
thereby conclusively settled. But 
it would be well to ask, who is 
'Science?' and where does he live? 
and how comes he to know these 
things? The fact is there is no 
'science' in this sense. It is true 
that a few capable men have at- 
tempted to explore the field of Na- 
ture in various directions, and have 
ascertained a fact or two, to which 
they have added a thousand guess- 
es. But they have left a million 
questions unanswered, without 
which no safe conclusions can be 
drawn. It is the commonest thing 
for Science to contradict one day 
what it most positively asserted the 
day previous; so that, in view of the 
existing state of complete scientific 
ignorance of the subject of origins, 
it would be absurd to accept as true 
any statement on that subject in the 
name of "Science." 

Professor Theodore Graebner, in 
his able and convincing books, "Es- 
says on Evolution," boldly asserts 
that scientists as a rule are evolu- 
tionists. That they are agreed on 
a single fact, mode or process in- 
volved in the theory of evolution 
must strenuously be denied : 

When I was a boy, science said 
the atom was the smallest possible 
division of matter; now science says 
the atom is a system of gyrating 
worlds. A few generations ago 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



3 



science said the sun revolved a- 
round the earth ; then science denied 
it and said the sun is standing still 
and the earth does the revolving; 
now science says both statements 
are false and both earth and sun go 
whirling through space. A year 
or so ago science said that light is 
a form of motion; now science says 
that light is matter and subject to 
gravitation. 

In view of such facts, it reminds 
me of what an able writer in one of 
our city papers said about evolu- 
tionary advocates, namely, that 
many things they talk and write 
about they know no more about 
than a negro washerwoman of the 
street. 

Thomas A. Edison, the great 
scientist and inventor, in American 
Magazine, Aug. 1921, said: 

We don't know one millionth part 
of one per cent, about anything. We 
don't know what water is. We 
don't know what light is. We don't 
know what gravitation is. We don't 
know what enables us to keep on 
our feet to stand up. We don't 
know what electricity is. We don't 
know what heat is. We don't know 
anything about magnetism. Wc 
have a lot of hypotheses, but that is 
all. 

Mr. Spurgeon said : "Unlettered 
ignorance is a great evil, but learn- 
ed ignorance is worse, and such is 
all learning that decoys the heart 
from Jesus." Again he said: "If it 
ever comes to a choice between 
man's science and God's revelation, 
I shall say, Let God be true but ev- 
ery man a liar." Sir William Hanf- 
ilton said: "The highest reach of 
human science is the scientific 
recognition of human ignorance." 



Pope said, "To be wise is to know 
how little can be known." Doubt- 
less the world is cursed today with 
learned ignorance and blasphem- 
ous presumption, which in the name 
of science, progress, knowledge, 
etc. is now taking possession of the 
high schools, colleges, universities, 
and I am sorry to have to say that 
Primitive Baptists in common with 
the matter of other people are 
going along, patronizing such edu- 
cational institutions and paying 
their money to keep them up. Let 
:s stop here, and ask ourselves this 
question. In patronizing and paying 
my taxes to keep up such schools 
am I bringing up my children in the 
nurture and admonition of the devil 
and denying the blessed Jesus? 
SeeEph|6:4, Matt. 10:33. But 
says some, How can we help our- 
selves? Ans. By informing our- 
selves, and by opposing it with all 
our might in conversation, in writ- 
ing and speaking against it and vot- 
ing against anything and anybody 
that favors it. Tennessee, Missis- 
sippi and Arkansas have passed 
laws forbidding the teaching of it 
in their public schools, etc. As this 
is a government of and for and by 
the people, the people are respon- 
sible for whatever bad or good laws 
we have. 

I have spoken against this abomi- 
nation and have written against it 
for the last few years, because my 
conscience would not let me rest 
without it, and in this way I have 
sacrificed hundreds of dollars; but 
then I am willing to spend and be 
spent in defense of the truth, our 
homes and children, if the Lord 
will. 

G. W. STEWART 



218992 



4 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



GOODNESS AND MERCY FROM 
GOD. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

I am late in sending in my renew- 
al to the Landmark. I should have 
sent it in before now for the dear 
old paper is a welcome visitor in our 
home and I haven't missed but one 
copy. 

I believe the doctrine it prints 
contains so many good experiences 
which I love to read so well. 

Association time is drawing near 
and I would like to be there. If I 
am not deceived, my heart's desire 
is to mingle with and in the sweet 
fellowship with the dear saints of 
God. I was blessed with the privi- 
lege of attending the Contentnea 
Association last fall. I met sister 
Lancaster there and spent the night 
at her home. I am sure she and 
her people are some of God's chosen 
ones, else they could never have 
had so much patience with us. I 
have thought of those dear people 
many times and would like to ex- 
tend to them my many thanks. 

I feel that there are so many 
deeds of kindness shown me, of 
which I am not worthy. Sometimes 
I am made to feel like His goodness 
and mercy have followed me all the 
days of my life. Goodness, because 
it all came from God and He is noth- 
ing but Goodness, and mercy, be- 
cause all that He has bestowed up- 
on me and in me has come without 
my deserving it. I know if I have 
ever done a good deed or act I was 
prompted of the Lord, for it was 
none of my goodness. I feel that 
He has kept me all the days of my 
life, has kept me out of many temp- 
tations so many girls have fallen 



prey to. All praise to His Holy 
Name. 

I also hope the good Lord will al- 
low me to dwell in his house for- 
ever, which I know will be in 
mercy. Hoping the Lord to be my 
guide and protection while on the 
shores of time and to be with me to 
the end. 

Cast a mantle of charity over 
this poorly worded letter, because 
I am nothing but a failure, hoping 
and trusting with all the faith I 
have, the good Lord will lengthen 
the time with you to publish the 
dear old Landmark, for the pleasure 
and joy of so many of God's little 
ones to feed upon His word by so 
many witnesses of His great and en- 
during love he has toward all his 
people. 

Hoping that each and every one 
that meets in this Association will 
have the pleasure of enjoying it 
with the fulness of his love. 

MRS. J. G. GASKTLL, 
Hobucken, N. C. 



PREDESTINATION. 

Having predestined us unto the 
adoption of children by Jesus Christ 
unto himself, according to the good 
pleasure of his will. — Eph. 1:5. 

The word having as its meaning 
to certify to a thing having been al- 
ready completed, and not to be done 
in the future, as the world or carnal 
mind would have you to believe, but 
as God's people, in the mind and 
purpose of God, had been saved be- 
fore the foundation of the world, 
the Apostle used this one word to 
carry out his meaning, the redemp- 
tion of his people. "By grace are 
ye saved." 

The verses preceding this verse 
reads: Blessed be the God and 
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



5 



who hath blessed us with all spirit- 
ual blessings in heavenly places in 
Christ. 

According as he hath chosen us 
in Christ before the foundation of 
the world, that we should be holy 
and without blame before him in 
love. 

Then comes the text. Having 
predestinated us unto the adoption 
of children by Jesus Christ unto 
himself, according to the good 
pleasure of his will. 

The next word in the text is pre- 
destinated, which also carries with 
it the meaning, the certainty, or the 
action of God, for all that God does 
he predestinates, and is the founda^ 
tion upon which the world was 
made, for he had to predestinate to 
speak the world into existence. 
Therefore when he said let there be 
light and there was light, he must 
have predestinated that light into 
existence. We really find some 
dislikes to the word predestination 
being carried too far, and it may be 
said to be true if it is not handled 
just right or in the right way, for 
instance when God predestinated 
us unto the adoption of children, it 
really meant that he had to do this 
over all the opposing powers of hell 
and the devil. 

What is God's attitude towards 
the opposing powers that has 
brought sin and iniquity into the 
worl'd, — to cause God to have to 
send his darling Son into the world 
to suffer, bleed and die that the lan- 
guage of our text might be fulfilled? 
He hates sin and promised to punish 
it, as he did on our former heads 
Adam and Eve as they brought sin 
into the world, through the devil. 
Death was pronounced upon them 
for their disobedience or violation 
of God's law. "For by the dis- 



ooedience of one man many were 
made sinners," so sin came by man, 
and death by sin, so death has been 
pronounced upon all for all have 
sinned. 

Did sin enter into the world with- 
out the knowledge of God? I 
might say the foreknowledge of God 
giving him the opportunity to pre- 
vent it if it had been His will. Lis- 
ten, we believe that He permitted 
sin to come into the world, or allow- 
ed sin to come into the world, or 
suffered it, just which ever you pre- 
fer to use, but did he do either 
without predestinating, to allow, to 
permit or suffer it? We say all 
that he does he predestinates. We 
do not say that he predestinates 
sin; He did predestinate to allow or 
permit sin to come into the world, 
and it came. 

Therefore brethren, the fact that 
God predestinates all righteousness, 
he makes that causitive, that is puts 
his power behind it and makes it 
come true, but the fact that he pre- 
destinates to allow, or permit, or 
suffer unrighteousness, that same 
fact is he keeps hands off, and the 
sinner is sure to carry out the un- 
righteousness that he is permitted 
to do. My dear child of God today 
what is your attitude toward sin. It 
is that you hate sin, but if God does 
not keep you out of it what is the 
consequences? You know that you 
go right on and commit the sin, so 
then Paul says, If we sin wilfully af- 
ter that we have received the knowl- 
edge of the truth, there remaineth 
no more sacrifice for sin, but a cer- 
tain fearful looking for of judgment 
and fiery indignation, which shall 
devour the adversaries. 

Friends, predestination is the, 
foundation upon which all our 
blessings come, and the basis on 



G 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



which our souls are saved. "Not of 
works of righteousness which we 
have done, but according to his own 
purpose and grace that was given 
us in Christ Jesus before the foun- 
dation of the world." But is now 
being made manifest, by the ap- 
pearing of our Saviour Jesus Christ, 
who hath abolished death, and 
hath brought life and immortality 
to light through the Gospel," which, 
to my mind, carries with it the 
meaning that we were one time 
dead in trespasses and sins, and God 
has quickened us into divine life, 
by putting his life in us, giving us 
the light of the knowledge of spirit- 
ual things, and through the Gospel, 
we are taught to have fellowship 
with one another; for John says, 
that which we have seen, and heard, 
declare we unto you, that ye also 
may have fellowship with us, and 
truly our fellowship is with the 
Father, and with his Son Jesus 
Christ. 

So then friends, the Apostles 
would have us to believe that we 
not only have the spirit of adop- 
tion whereby we cry Abba Father, 
that is our bodies are not born 
again, but that our spirits and our 
souls have tasted of the good word 
of God and powers of the world to 
come, and have been made alive, 
which gives us the right of the tree 
of life, which is Christ Jesus, and 
we ourselves groan within our- 
selves, waiting for the adoption, to 
wit, the resurrection, when the 
spirit of him that raised Christ from 
the dead, that now dwells in us, 
shall be reunited with our bodies, 
and they being fashioned like unto 
the glorious body of the Lord Jesus 
Christ, wherein one of old says, 
that now we see through a glass 
darkly, but then we shall see face to 



face, and will know even as we are 
known. 

But, brethren, he says this pre- 
destination is unto himself, and this 
one that has been predestinated un- 
to the adoption of children, are his 
people, or his church, wherein he 
says, upon this rock I will build my 
church and the gates of hell shall 
not prevail against it, which when 
completed, he will take unto him- 
self, and present them unto his 
Father, without wrinkle or blemish, 
or any such thing; and we shall be 
holy, and without blame before him 
in love. (Listen it is all according 
to the good pleasure of his will) , it 
was his will to do this, it was his 
pleasure to do this, therefore he pre- 
destinated it and there is no power 
upon earth or under heaven to pre- 
vent it, therefore, my beloved of 
the Lord be of good cheer, for "I 
have overcome the world, who for 
the joy that was set before him en- 
dured the cross, despising the 
shame, and is set down at the right 
hand of the throne of God, inter- 
ceding for us, who are kept by the 
power of God ready to be revealed 
at the last time." 

For God to predestinate, to allow, 
or permit sin, gives him power over 
sin. We believe if it had been his 
will, he would have predestinated 
for there to have been no sin, and 
there would have been none, but 
brethren it is here, and aren't you 
glad that God has power over it, to 
rule over it unto his own glory, in 
which it is said, He makes the 
wrath of man to praise him, and the 
remainder of wrath he restrains. 
The part of wrath that praises him 
is that which gives the children of 
God their troubles, and brings them 
to Christ for refuge, and the re- 
mainder he restrains, is the part 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



7 



that he keeps under and does not let 
it loose, or it would possibly destroy 
the church, and world's doctrine 
would be right, but brethren the 
glorious truth is the world does not 
know, and God will carry it out as 
it pleases him. 

For the prophet Hosea, says, 
speaking for God, "I will ransom 
them from the power of the grave, 
I will redeem them from death, O 
death I will be thy plague, O grave 
I will be thy destruction." So, 
then, brethren if the promises of 
our God are worth anything you 
will see that he has triumphed glor- 
iously, the horse and the rider he 
has cast into the sea. 

Therefore, He will say to the 
children of God that he has pre- 
destinated unto the adoption of 
children, "Come ye blessed of my 
Father, inherit the kingdom pre- 
pared for you from the foundation 
of the world," What a wonderful 
blessing it is to a poor sinner to have 
faith in such a God that has the 
power to redeem us from all iniquity 
and purify unto himself a peculiar 
people zealous of good works, and 
brethren, this inheritance is incor- 
ruptible, and undefiled, and fadeth 
not away, but is kept through 
faith, unto salvation, ready 
to be revealed in the last time," and 
if the spirit of him that raised Christ 
from the dead dwell in you, "he 
that raised up Christ from the dead, 
shall also quicken your mortal bod- 
ies, by his spirit that dwelleth in 
you," and, to my mind, bear out 
that truth, that the dead in Christ 
shall be raised first, then those who 
are alive and remain shall be caught 
up together with them in the clouds, 
to meet the Lord in the air, and so 
shall we ever be with the Lord. 

E. L. COBB. 



WE CAN'T TELL WHO PUT OUR 
MONEY IN OUR SACKS. 

Elder B. S. Cowan, Clerk of the 
Kehukee Association, delivered on 
Sunday, October the 27th, at the 
Black Creek Association, a very in- 
teresting sermon from a text found 
in the 43rd chapter of Genesis, "We 
can't tell who put our money in our 
sacks." 

Elder Cowan explained there was 
a famine in Canaan, and Jacob sent 
his ten sons into Egypt to buy corn. 
Joseph his son was in Egypt, but so 
far as Jacob knew Joseph was dead. 

Joseph's cup is placed in Benja- 
min's sack together with the money 
in every man's sack, and when they 
had departed on the way back home 
Joseph sends messengers after 
them, and the cup is found in Ben- 
jamin's sack, and they are made to 
return to Egypt, where Judah begs 
of Joseph to keep him as a hostage 
rather than Benjamin, for he has 
pledged his father that he will be a 
surety for Benjamin's return. It is 
then that Joseph makes himself 
known to his brethren. 

Jacob told them that Benjamin 
should not leave him, for he said, 
Joseph and Simeon are not, and if 
Benjamin is taken I shall die, and 
Reuben says if I bring him not back 
then slay my two sons before my 
face. 

Elder Cowan said that Reuben 
was not a type of Christ, but Judah 
is, when he said I will be a surety 
for him. Judah said that he shall 
go, and pledges himself to be a bond 
servant for Benjamin forever. Jesus 
becomes a surety for His people, to 
save them, not from their sins, but 
from themselves. 

Elder Cowan said that he prayed 
continually to be delivered from 



8 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



himself, from the wrath and malice 
of his own evil nature. 

The text says we cannot tell who 
put the money in our sacks. That 
is what takes place with us when 
we come to the end of our row. 
When Jesus comes into our lives, it 
robs us of all earthly things, and 
fixes our eyes and thoughts on Him 
and heavenly things. 

Jesus proclaimed his doctrine, 
and bade his disciples follow him. 
When others departed from him, he 
asked them if they would also go, 
and they replied Lord to whom shall 
we go, ye have the words of eternal 
life? They know He is their only 
Saviour. When there is a famine 
in the soul Jesus is the only one to 
whom the poor sinner can go. 

Joseph said to his brethren, ye 
meant it for evil but God meant it 
for good. 

The beasts made obeisance unto 
Joseph. His brethren said he was a 
dreamer, for he was given inspira- 
tion from on high, and his brethren 
hated him. 

The pharisees and scribes hated 
Christ because he condemned their 
lives and conduct and their religion. 
Genuine religion is in the hearts of 
His children. Christ said that our 
righteousness must exceed the right- 
eousness of the scribes and phari- 
sees, for their righteousness was by 
the law, and for this the death of 
Christ would not avail, for we are 
not under the law but under grace. 

The sinner never makes supplica- 
tion to God until he finds it neces- 
sary. The brethren of Joseph did 
not see any necessity for hungering 
and thirsting after the corn in 
Egypt until there was a famine in 
Canaan, and so it is with the child 
of God. We must be brought to 



the footstool of mercy through ad- 
versity. 

There was no one in Egypt that 
could help them but Joseph, and 
tnere is no one to whom we can go 
ior help but our spiritual Joseph, 
the Lord ot lord's and King of kings. 
He is the Lamb of God that taketh 
away the sin of the world. 

They went to Egypt to buy corn, 
and we go down to buy corn, with 
which to feed our hungry souls. 
We go with all we have but it 
avails nothing. We find our money 
in our sacks, for it is of no value to 
the soul. We are in the same con- 
dition as Joseph's brethren, we 
have crucified our Lord, we are vile 
sinners and under condemnation 
and can only beg for mercy. 

We forget our Lord when we 
walk in our own strength, and de- 
pend on our money and the things 
of this world. God is not mocked. 
The gold and silver, and the corn 
and the crops and the cattle on a 
thousand hills are His. But where 
shall wisdom be found? Only in 
Jesus Christ, the wisdom and the 
righteousness, and sanctification 
and redemption, according as it is 
written. Let him that glory, glory 
in the Lord. 

Where do we stray? Generally 
back and forth to Egypt, with our 
afflictions. What haunteth us 
through all our lives? The chil- 
dren of Jacob were disturbed by 
their sins. We get on all right un- 
til God turns on the light and de- 
mands an accounting. It was not 
the purpose of Joseph to reveal 
himself to his brethren, until he was 
ready to do so. The Apostle Paul 
was a prisoner. He said I go to 
Jerusalem, and yet he did not know 
what awaited him there, but one 
thing he did know and that was to 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



9 



preach the unsearchable riches of 
Christ. 

Simeon was a type of the gospel 
ministry, and the fox and the fire 
cuts down the standing corn of the 
Phillistines, and the Holy Ghost 
cuts down the dross in the hearts of 
his children. 

When Joseph makes himself 
known to his brethren, that is typi- 
cal of the way that Jesus comes and 
makes himself known to the poor 
sinner who feels a deep conviction 
for his sins and is dependent on the 
Lord for salvation. Then there is 
an end to the famine in our souls. 
Hunger and thirst are done away, 
and the glorious light of His mercy 
shines in the face of our Lord, and 
we are built up and lifted up in Him. 

Nothing is so destructive as a 
famine. There is no peace and no 
tranquility for the hungry soul, but 
when Jesus makes himself known, 
there is joy and happiness, and a 
feast is spread of good things, and 
the soul is satisfied. 

Joseph knows them, but they do 
not know him. Jesus knows what 
is troubling us, and so as John says, 
He is the first born among many 
brethren and the one altogether 
lovely, with all the glory of the 
Father revealed in His person. He 
gives His children that peace of 
mind that passeth all understand- 
ing, and fits them without spot or 
wrinkle or any such thing for His 
kingdom. 

It was very gratifying to see El- 
der George Boswell who has recov- 
ered his health preside as Modera- 
tor over the Association. He thank- 
ed all the brethren and friends 
and neighbors for their kindness 
and hospitality, and said that the 
preaching had been very enjoyable 
and with power, giving God the 



glory. Tne Association next year 
comes to Wilson, where all the 
brethren and sisters and friends will 
ue given a most cordial welcome. 

J. D. GOLD. 



BLACK CREEK ASSOCIATION. 

The 53rd annual session of the 
Black Creek Primitive Baptist As- 
sociation composing 23 churches, in 
this section met with the church at 
Creeches, near Micro and Kenly, in 
Johnson County, beginning Friday, 
October the 25th. 

We had with us 13 visiting 
preachers, who preached to us the 
blessed Gospel of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, and better preaching we 
have never had at any of our asso- 
ciations, not a jar from any one. The 
names of those present follow: J. 
P. Tingle, Leonard Raper, E. F. 
Pearce, T. A. Stanfield, L. H. Steph- 
enson, T. C. West, J. L. Ross, J. S. 
Corbett, Exure Lee, B. S. Cowan, J. 
E. Mewborn, W. E. Grimes, W. G. 
Turner, and there were several of 
our own preachers. 

The crowd was very large on Sat- 
urday and Sunday but was very 
orderly which is to be commended. 
Possibly there were 4000 or more 
on Sunday, and all the above 
preachers, spoke during the three 
days. 

Our esteemed brother and Elder 
G. W. Boswell was chosen to be our 
Moderator, filling the vacancy caus- 
ed by the death of our beloved El- 
der J. C. Hooks, and we trust it will 
be in the hands of our God for him 
to have the office for a good many 
years to come. Elder S. B. Denny 
was chosen assistant moderator. 
The Association next year convenes 
in Wilson. 

E. L. COBB, 
Association Clerk. 



10 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ZION'S JLANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy lathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIIL No. 1 



Entered at vhe postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSON, N. C. NOV. 15, 1929 



LET THEM ALONE. 

The Apostles were put in the com- 
mon prison for no other cause than 
preaching Jesus as the way, the 
truth and the life and beside him no 
saviour. This and other unjust in- 
dignities and punishments did not 
deter them from teaching the gospel 
truths committed unto them and 
commanded of them. 

We have a most remarkable pic- 
ture of the will, power and divine 
purpose of God in the preaching of 
the gospel as we read the accounts 
of the deliverance of the Apostles 
as recorded in the 5th Chapter of 
the Acts of the Apostles. 

Here we see the Apostles impris- 
oned; but "The Angel of God, or of 
the Lord, by night, opened the 
prison doors, and brought them 
forth and said go, stand and speak 
in the temple to the people, all the 
words of life." 

Night, the darkness that en- 
shrouds the earth, is typical of the 
darkness of the soul, when Jesus 



withholds his presence and it is on- 
ly when the Lord, or His angel or 
spirit appears, that the fettered 
soul is set free and enabled to walk 
about Zion, to tell of her towers and 
of her bulwarks of strength and 
power. 

In this wonderful narrative, we 
see the Council meeting, the Apos- 
tles, as prisoners are sent for, and lo 
the prison is empty. But, says one, 
those men are even now in the tem- 
ple teaching the people, doing just 
what the angel bade them do, teach- 
ing all the words of life. 

They are brought before the 
Council and the High Priest asked 
them saying, "Did not we straitly 
command you that ye should not 
teach in this name? and behold ye 
have filled Jerusalem with your 
doctrine." 

What a wonderful truth he utter- 
ed and did not know it. Jerusa- 
lem, the City of God, that Holy City 
which cometh down from God, as a 
bride adorned from her husband 
hath been filled with the doctrine 
of God's eternal truth and all will 
be so perfectly taught of the Lord 
that the song of eternal praise to 
His name will be without a discord- 
ant note. 

Peter said to his accusers and 
would be dictators, and the 
other said also, "We ought to obey 
God rather than men." 

No truly called and qualified min- 
ister, educated in the school of 
God's grace and mercy, should heed 
the demand? or commands of men 
when they are not in fill' accord 
with tic true and divine teachings 
of the spirit and of the scriptures. 
Neither should those who have not 
been to the same school forbid 
them. We commend the posiicm 
of Gamaliel, the great luw teatr . 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



11 



in this respect. 

Gamaliel was one of the Council 
sitting in Judgment, in the trial of 
the Apostles and, among other 
things, said, "LET THEM ALONE." 
He had reference to the apostles, 
there held as prisoners, so lately set 
free by the Angel of the Lord. 

Gamaliel said, "If this council or 
this work (We think he had refer- 
ence to the work or teaching of the 
Apostles) be ox men, it will come to 
naught; but if it be of God, ye can- 
not over throw it, lest haply ye be 
found fighting against. God." 

The council did not take the ad- 
vice of Gamaliel in full; but had 
them beaten and let them go, and 
they rejoiced that they were ac- 
counted worthy to suffer persecu- 
tion for His names' sake. 

We should be careful not to con- 
demn those who speak a word in 
the name of the Lord. If it is of 
the flesh it will fall of its own 
weight; but if it is of the Lora all 
the powers of earth and hell cannot 
overthrow it. 

Our zeal for our cause and for 
the position and contentions of those 
associated with us may sometime;-; 
lead us to be unmindful of the 
claims of others and lead us to say 
unkind things or contend to no 
profit, with those who are not in 
position to agree with us due to 
their not having been taught in the 
same school of experience. 

We read, "Better that a millstone 
be banged about the neck and that 
ye be cast into the sea than that ye 
offend one of these, my little ones." 

This morning does not justify the 
ministers of God, in their failure, to 
contend earnestly for the faith once 
delivered to the saints : but the com 
mand is that ye taKe heed unto 
yourselves and to the doctrine, and 



to the flock over which God hath 
made thee overseer. In that pre- 
scribed field there is enough to en- 
gage the time and thought of all 
true ministers of God, for a called 
man of God, we believe, will find 
that his gift will make room for the 
exercise of the same. 

Peter, when told by the Lord to 
feed His sheep and lambs, saw John 
whom Jesus loved and said, "Lord 
what shall this man do? Jesus said 
unto him, "If I will that he carry till 
I come, what is that to thee? follow 
thou me." 

We are also admonished not to 
judge another's servant, for unto his 
own master the servant is account- 
able. 

To my mind, I have felt that it 
was not proper that I should spend 
the time allotted for preaching the 
word, in a general criticism of other 
religious orders, by telling things 
in a humorous vein, ridiculing, in a 
fun-making spirit, the religious ef- 
forts of others. To God and to 
Christ they are accountable and we 
may misjudge their sincerity since 
God and Christ alone knoweth all 
the secrets of the heart. 

Somebody was commanded to 
measure the temple of God, and the 
altar and the worshipers therein; 
but the court which is without the 
temple leave out and measure it 
not." 

David said, "Walk about Zion, 
and go round about her; tell the 
towers thereof. Mark ye well her 
bulwarks, consider her palaces; 
that ye may tell it to the generation 
following. For this God is our God 
forever and ever; He will be our 
guide even unto death." 

The minister of the word, who 
comes declaring all the words of 
life, doing as David said in the 



12 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



above quotation, is a highly blessed 
man and no other theme in all the 
world so comforts the children of 
Uod as the simple, yet glorious, gos- 
pel of the Kingdom of God. 

We do not know the mind of the 
Lord, nor the bounds of His mercy; 
except as we are taught that His 
presence tills immensity and that in 
tne end His people will be brought 
irom all the inhabited parts of the 
earth, of every nation, kindred, ton- 
gue and people, an innumerable 
host that no man can number. We 
are glad to believe that his mercy 
has reached, does reach and will 
reach every truly convicted soul 
that ever has or ever will feel the 
need of sovereign mercy. 

John said to the Lord. "Master, 
we saw one casting out devils in 
Thy name and we forbade him, be- 
cause he followeth not with us." 
Jesus said "Forbid him not (let him 
alone) for he that is not against us 
is with us." 

We see kindness and morality 
and the claim of belief in the Lord 
Jesus Christ among those not fol- 
lowing with us, and we, like John, 
may be inclined to forbid them; but 
is it not better to look well after the 
order of our own household than to 
be too much engaged in showing the 
faults of others. 

The preaching of the gospel of 
peace and love begets fellowship 
and love and works no ill to others. 

May the Lord have mercy upon 
all our unrighteousness, and so di- 
rect us in the way that we may be 
found walking circumspectly before 
the Lord, contending, not in malice 
or with hatred, but in love for the 
dictrine and order and godly de- 
portment of the people of God, ear- 
nestly endeavoring, by the grace of 
God, to let our light so shine before 



men, that the name and cause of 
Christ may have all the honour and 
glory forever. 

Yours in haste, 

O. J. DENNY. 



ENJOYED THE MEETINGS. 

I was favored to attend the last 
session of both the Kehukee and 
Contentnea Associations and also 
four appointments between Rober- 
sonville, Greenville, Fremont and 
Wilson. All of these meetings were 
well attended and it was indeed a 
pleasure to meet many dear breth- 
ren, sisters and friends whom I had 
known years ago when I lived in 
North Carolina, also formed some 
new acquaintances that were of 
the same kind. The preaching I 
heard was good. It gave God the 
glory in the salvation of poor fallen 
man, as did all the conversation of 
the brethren and sisters in our pri- 
vate talks. I have been a member 
of the Primitive Baptist Church 
more than fifty years and have tried 
to preach for them from South Caro- 
lina to Maine, and have heard many 
of them tell of their experiences, 
both before and since receiving a 
hope, and all of them in substance 
say with Paul, "By the grace of 
God I am what I am," and surely 
we all can agree with David when 
he said in the 133 Psalm that it is 
both good and pleasant to behold 
brethren dwelling together in unity. 
They are all born again, born of the 
Same spirit, taught the same lessons, 
and take none of the glory to them- 
selves, but give it all to the God of 
their salvation, the God who made 
heaven and earth. This unity or 
oneness of spirit is wonderful, for it 
is the Lord's doing and is marvelous 
in our eyes. 

Now this brings me to consider 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



13 



for a little while the earnest en- 
treaty of our apostle Paul, in the 
4th Chapter of his epistle to the 
Ephesians. He begins by saying, 
"I therefore, the prisoner of the 
Lord, beseech you that ye walk 
worthy of the vocation wherewith 
ye are called. 

2nd verse. With all lowliness and 
meekness, with long-suffering, for- 
bearing one another in love. 

3rd verse. Endeavoring to keep 
the unity of the spirit in the bond of 
peace. • . 

What a loving and Godly appeal 
by one who had been taught of God 
as all of us have been taught (if we 
be what we hope to be) one who 
notwithstanding the abundance of 
revelation given to him did not feel 
(himself above the humblest, but 
said, I am with you in weakness 
and in fear and in much trembling, 
knowing that all the Lord's chil- 
dren are taught of him, and from 
him receive the ereat peace that a 
blessed hope in Christ affords. He 
beseeches them as living children, 
having the mind of Christ, to keen 
this oneness of spirit in the bond of 
peace. As children of God thev 
spe eve to eye and speak the same 
things as already shown as chil- 
dren of men. Thev see things from 
their different noints of view. T>o 
we not all know that the thins-s 
that the Lord teaches is far more 
important than all the ideas of men. 
John 1 :3 says. "That which we ha-^e 
seen and heard declare we unto 
von. that ve also mav have fellow- 
ship with us. And trulv our f^l- 
lowcsViin is with the Father, and 
with his Son, Jesus Christ. Brethren 
is not this a e-ood thine* to do? When 
we talk of thincrs we know we liaw 
thp fellowship of the Lord's neonle. 
and they know that our fellowship 



is with the Father and the Son. Is 
not this fellowship worthwhile? Is 
not this unity of spirit worth while 
endeavoring to keep in the bond of 
peace? Let us all hold fast the 
form of sound words, and never for- 
get that such words as the apostles 
have used are the soundest words 
we can use, and then do not con- 
demn a brother for a word. It is 
ot to be expected that my brother 
will see every thing as I see it, or 
say everything as I say it. Shall I 
turn my back on him because he 
does not, or say to him, get out, you 
do not belong in our family. God 
forbid. Maybe he is as near right 
as I am. We all see through a 
glass darkly. If I for any especial 
reason know I am right, does not 
our brother Paul say, "We that are 
strong ought to bear the infirmities 
of the weak, and not to please our- 
selves." 

What an awful thing it is to de- 
stroy a brother for whom Christ 
died. James 1 :4 asks, "From 
whence come wars and fighting 
among you ? Come they not hence, 
even of your lusts that war in your 
members? Yes this is the source of 
wars among the Lord's people. They 
do not fight over things that pro- 
ceed from him. He is not the au- 
thor of confusion, but of peace as in 
all the churches of the saints. Let 
us labor for peace, and not by being 
meddlers or becoming busy bodies 
in other men's matters, but bv liv- 
ing 1 and preaching in such manner 
that those see our life and hear our 
words mav know that we have 
the neace and prosperity of the 
church of God at heart, boldlv con- 
tend for the thincrs tauffht in the 
^orintures in that humble Christ- 
like wav that the anostles did and 
such things as the children of God 



14 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



cannot accept keep to ourselves, for 
they are the judges of gospel truth. 

And now dear ones may the Lord 
grant us reconciling grace, and 
peace that passeth all understand- 
ing, and bless us to live together as 
the family of God should, forbear- 
ing one another in love. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE, 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas it has pleased the God of 
Heaven to remove from us our dear sister, 
Emma Pope Edmunds, we bow in humble 
submission to His will, asking His mercies 
to us and her family, trusting in Him, be- 
lieving all He does is right, Be it resolved, 

1st. That we extend our heartfelt 
sympathy to her family. 

2nd. That we send a copy of the above 
to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

3rd. That we place same on our church 
boks. 

Done by order of the church at Kehukee 
in conference Jan. 19th., 1929. 

A. B. BENSON, Moderator 
WADE BUTTS, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas it has been the Lord's will to 
remove from our midst our beloved sister, 
Mrs. Fannie Fleming, who departed this 
life May 13th., 1929, who was born Febru- 
ary 8th, 1853, making her stay on earth 
76 years, 3 months and five days. She 
was the daughter of Joseph and Harriett 
Gaines. She grew to womanhood and 
married Mr. John Fleming of Pitt County. 
To this union were born eight children, 
three proceeding her to the grave. The 
living are, Charles R., Wilton F., and J. 
Sam Flemming, Mrs. Jessie W. Taylor and 
Mrs. W. C. Chauncey where she died. 

Her funeral services were conducted at 
the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. C. 
Chauncey, by Elder B. S. Cowin, who 
spoke very comforting and continued at 
the grave by the writer. She united with 
the church at Briary Swamp on the second 
Saturday in September, 1919, and was 
baptized by her pastor on the following 
Sunday with five others. She enjoyed 
sweet fellowship with the church, and al- 
ways filled her seat when she was able. In 
her last declining years she wasn't able to 
attend the meetings. She had a lovely 
character and sweet disposition. 

We feel our loss is her eternal gain. We 
mourn not for her as one who has no 
hope. We believe she is resting in the 
sweet Paradise of God. And she believed 
in the glorious doctrine of Salvation by 
Grace. We feel assured that she will not 
need the light of the sun, neither the 
moon, but God will be her everlasting 
light, and the days of her mourning are 
ended. We loved her but God loved her 
best so he took her home to rest. There 



has been a p'ace made vacant by her de- 
parting at the church. We pray that God 
of all grace might direct the mantle to 
fall upon another. 

Written by a brother, 

J. L. ROSS. 



ROBERT L. TAYLOR 

Our dear brother and deacon, Robert L. 
Taylor, son of Wiley and Marina Daniel 
Taylor, was born September 2, 1857, in 
Martin County, North Carolina, and died 
April 21, 1929. 

He was married to Susan Gobynes, De- 
cember 29, 1877. To them were born 
nine children, four boys and five girls. 
Only four survive with his dear wife, the 
others preceding him to the grave several 
years before. Those living are George T. 
Taylor of Norfolk, Va., Mrs. Henry D. Ed- 
momlson of near Everetts, Mrs. Vivian Sil 
verthorn of Richmond, Va., Mrs . Lester 
Keel, who lived with him until his death 
and was a very faithful daughter to him, 
ever ready to do the things that were a 
comfort to him. 

He also has one living brother, G. T. 
Taylor of Norfolk, Va., and one sister, 
Mrs] James Ausbone of near Robersonville. 
He has sixteen grandchildren. 

He joined the Primitive Baptist church 
of Spring Green, Saturday before the 
fourth Sunday in September 1879, was 
baptized Sunday by Elder C .B. Hassell, 
pastor of Spring Green Church. He was 
a very faithful member, always filling his 
seat even though many times he had to 
walk six or seven miles. He was there 
through rain or cold. I asked him once 
wasn't it raining too much to go and he 
said, "I haven't anything to do with the 
rain, but it is time to go to church," so he 
went, which is an evidence of spiritual 
love. He was a good man in his family 
but there wasn't anything that could turn 
him away from his church. Very soon af- 
ter he joined the church he was made 
deacon, filling the place better than any 
one I ever knew. He was always looking 
after the welfare of the church. He visit- 
ed the sick, the poor and the needy and ad- 
ministered unto them such as he was able, 
and oh, what is any more comfort to the 
poor child of God than to have their 
brethren and sisters visit them and talk of 
the goodness and mercy of our Lord. 

He had been in bad health for several 
years before he died, failing each year in 
both body and mind. The last years he 
would come to church alone, when he 
didn't have mind enough to tie his horse. 
He had faith and love enough to go. Some- 
times his folks at home couldn't keep him 
from going when there was no one able to 
go with him. He told me the last timp I 
saw him at church that he was only wait- 
ing for the Lord's time to call him away. 
He said his wife and daughter were so 
good to him he ought to be happy, but that 
he was tired of this life. He dreaded the 
sting of death, but apart from that he was 
ready to go. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



15 



Bro. W. E. Grimes held prayer meeting 
for him i tew days before he died, which 
h ! seemed to enjoy so much. He sang the 
d<ar old song he loved so well, all alone, 
"Amazing Grace." He bore his afflictions 
with much patience always saying they 
were the mercies of the Lord. He died 
without a murmur, gently falling asleep. 
His body was placed in the edar old church 
he loved so well, at Spring Green, where 
the funeral services were held by Elders 
R. S. Cowan and W. E. Grimes, pastors of 
the church, then the body was laid to rest 
in the church yard cemetery, among a 
large crowd of sorrowing friends and 
loved ones. 

Dearest husband thou hast left me, 
In this world to mourn and sigh, 

But beyond this world of sorrow, 
I hope we'll meet again on high. 

Dearest father, how we miss thee, 

In our humble homes below; 
But the Lord of Glory called thee, 

And to him thou had to go. 

Dearest uncle how we loved thee, 

No one on earth can tell; 
But the Lord did love thee better, 

So we say dear one farewell. 

Dearest brother how we miss thee, 
Fifty years we've heard thy voice, 

Sing the dear old songs of Zion, 
How in love we have rejoiced. 

May the dear Lord who alone is able, 
comfort and bless the dear companion 
and children. May his life be an example 
that they may walk in his footsteps, ever 
looking unto Jesus who is the author and 
finisher of every faith. 
Written by his niece, 

NORA D. GRIMES. 
This done bv the order of Conference. 

B. S. COWAN. Moderator, 
W. A. ROSS, Clerk, 

of Spring Green Church. 



FLORENCE DAVIS 

By request of the members of Kehukee 
Church I shall attempt to write a short 
sketch of our dear sister, Florence Davis. 

She was born February 2 3, 1864, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. P.Threewitts 
of Ringwood, N. C. She had four bro- 
thers and four sisters, all of whom pre- 
ceded her to the grave except two sisters. 
Mrs. Sallie Spivey of Enfield and Mrs. Irene 
Warren of Manatee, Fla. 

She united with the Methodist church in 
early womanhood. 

She married John Davis, of Hamilton, 
February 23, 1886, and unto this union 
were born two daughters, Ruth and Irene. 
Irene died in early childhood. 

Sister Davis united with the Primitive 
Baptist church at Kehukee sometime be- 
tween 1886 and 1890, the exact date I 
have not been able to learn. 

She lost her husband in 1901, then she 



was a poor widow with two daughters, 
looking ever unto her Savior for comfort 

She went to live with her brothers at 
Ringwood and there she and Ruth made 
their home until her brothers died. She 
then went to Mississippi to live with her 
married daughter, Ruth. 

She was deprived of the sweet privilege 
Of worshipping at her church, but for a 
tew times within the last nine years of her 
life. She would often write letters and 
send a small donation to her church. She 
often expressed a great desire to be with 
us at Kehukee once more before she died. 
She bore her afflictions patiently, desiring 
to be reconciled to God's will. 

She died June 13, 19 29 in Steen's, Mis- 
sissippi. Her body was brought to Enfield 
accompanied by her daughter and son-in- 
law and two grandchildren. 

Funeral services were conducted by the 
Missionary Baptist preacher of Enfield 
and interment took place in the family 
burying ground near Ringwood. The 
large crowd present and beautiful floral 
offerings attested the high esteem in 
w hich she was held. 

Written by, 

MARY D. WHITE. 



DEACON STEPHEN CAVANAUGH. 

The subject of this sketch was born De- 
cember 31st., 1856, and departed this life 
January 31, 1929, making his stay on 
earth 70 years and one month. 

The time of uniting with the church is 
unknown to the writer. He united with 
the church at Muddy Creek in Duplin Co., 
and remained there all his life. He was 
chosen by the church and set apart for 
deacon some 27 years ago. This office he 
filled well and the church felt they had 
made a wise choice. He was faithful to 
his trust in all cases and seemed to be fit- 
ted to his office. Brother Cavanaugh was 
a good man and greatly respected by all 
who knew him. He was a loving husband 
and father and a good neighbor. We can 
truly say, there is a good citizen gone, and 
the church has lost one whose place will 
he hard to fill and the bereaved ones have 
lost one whose place cannot be filled. We, 
the church at Muddy Creek, do commend 
them to God who doeth all things well. 
We should not weep as they who have no 
hope for we feel our loss is his eternal 
gain. Done by order of church in Confer- 
ence Saturday before fourth Sunday, by 
L. E. BRYAN, 

Beulaville, N. C. 



RESOLVTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas the God of all grace in His in- 
finite wisdom saw fit to remove from our 
midst by the cold hand of death on Decem- 
ber 18, 1 928, our beloved brother and 
father in Israel, Mr. George W. Johnson, 
be it resolved, 

1st. That the church at Hannah's 
Creek has lost one of its most faithful and 
devoted members, but that we bow in 



16 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



humble submission to this dispensation of 
Divine providence, feeling that our loss is 
his eternal gain. 

2nd. That we extend to his children in 
this sad bereavement, our heartfelt sym- 
pathy and point them for comfort to the 
Saviour he worshiped and loved. 

3rd. That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to his children, a copy be 
spread upon our church book, and a copy 
sent to Zion's Landmark and to the Primi- 
tive Baptist for publication. 

We wish further to say that Bro. John- 
son had lived to the ripe old age of 78 
years, 4 months and a few days, having re- 
sided in Johnston County, N. C, where he 
was well known and held in high esteem 
And he will be greatly missed by his chil- 
dren, brethren and friends. 

His dear companion preceded him to the 
"Better Land" 9 years ago, since which 
time he made his home with his youngest 
son L. C. Johnson. 

His children surviving him are Mrs. J. 
n Hamilton, of Smithfield, Mrs. Ramson 
Creech of Goldsboro. Mrs. Lester Massen- 
trill of Benson and Messrs. C. A. and L. C. 
Johnson of Benson, N. C, R. 1. 

Bro. Johnson had been a most faithful 
member of the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Hannah's Creek, Johnston Co., N. C, 
for 52 years, always faithful to duty and 
attendance and was for many years a dea- 
con, which office we have never seen bet- 
ter filled. He loved his breathren and 
visited them especially if they were in 
trouble or affliction. 

His health was declining for Severn 1 
years. He was taken to the Johnston Co. 
hospital for treatment a few weeks before 
he died and after the skilled doctor and 
nurses did all they could and found recov- 
ery impossible, took him to the home of 
his oldest daughter. Mrs. J. C. Hamilton, 
where he lived just two weeks. 

The remains were taken back to Hannah 
Creek Church where his beloved pastor, 
Rider Xure Lee assisted by Elder Jesse 
Rarnes, held funeral services after which 
the remains were taken to his old home- 
stead and placed beside his dear wife to 
await the resurrection. 

Done by order of the church in confer- 
ence on Saturday before 3rd Sunday in 
January, 1 9 29. 

D. G. ALLEN 
T. E. JOHNSON, 
C. A. JOHNSON, 

Committee. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas God in his wisdom and mercy 
saw fit to visit our little flock and remove 
from us by death our dearly beloved Sis- 
ter Lucinda McLamb. 

Sister McLamb died Dec. 31st., 19 28, 
making her stay on earth 29 year';. 7 
months and 29 days. 

She was married September 14th.. 1916 
to Milton McLamb, and to this union were 
born 5 children, one preceding her to the 
grave some years ago. 



She united with the church at Hannah 
Ci'pek, living a faithful membership until 
her death. 

Therefore, Be It Resolved: 
1st. That we extend our deepest sympa- 
thy to the bereaved family in their loss. 
We feel our loss is her eternal gain. May 
the Lord reconcile them to his will. 

2nd. The church at Hannah's Creek 
has lost a faithful member. She was a 
regular attendant and will be greatly 
missed by our church. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to Zion's Landmark for publica- 
tion, one placed on our church records, 
and one sent to the family. 

Done by order of conference at Han- 
nah's Creek Church, Saturday before the 
3rd., Sunday in Jan. 1929. 

ELDER XURE LEE. Moderator 
CHARLIE JOHNSON, Clerk, 
D. G. ALLEN, 
T. E. JOHNSON, 

Committee. 



BETTTE C. CRANDALL. 

In fond remembrance of our departed 
mother, sister and friend, we make the at- 
tempt to write a short sketch of her life. 

She was the widow of the late Robert 
C. Crandall, who preceded her to the grave 
many years ago. 

To this union were born eight children, 
seven of whom survive, three boys and 
four girls. She leaves to mourn her loss, 
besides her children, manv grandchildren 
and great grandchildren and many other 
relatives and friends, but we feel that our 
loss is her eternal gain. She departed 
this life on Sunday. March twenty-fourth, 
1929. She was born July 28, 1859, mak- 
ing her stay on earth 69 years, eight 
months, and two weeks. 

This dear sister and mother united with 
the church at Briery Swamp when quite 
young. She was a lovely sister until her 
death and always filled her seat each and 
every meeting unless providentially hin- 
dered. This sister was ill in bed four 
years, six months and two weeks. Her 
disease was unknown. All that loving 
hands and doctors could do was done, but 
none can stay the icy hand of death. 

The funeral was held at the home by 
Elder John Rogerson and Elder Ben 
Cowan and interment was made in the 
family plot at the old homestead. Thus 
passes one of Pitt Countv's most beloved 
citizens after having ln r ed a most conse- 
crated Christian life and one of usefulness. 

Blessed are the dead who die in the 
Lord, that they may rest from their labor 
and their works do follow them. Ripe in 
years, rich in deeds, a good woman has 
passed to her reward. Sleep on dear sis- 
ter till the resurrection morn, when our 
Father bid His child come home. 

Written by, 

BETTIE E. WARREN, 
LUCIE HOUSE. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

■ AT ~ ■ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII. DECEMBER 1, 1929 No. 2 



SOLOMON PUNISHED FOR HIS IDOLATRY. 



"But King Solomon loved many strange women, together with the 
daughter of Pharoah, women of the Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, 
Zidonians, and Hittites; 

Of all the nations concerning which the Lord said unto the Children 
of Israel, Ye shall not go into them, neither shall they come in unto you; 
for surely they would turn away your heart after their god; Solomon 
clave unto these in love; /. 

And he had seven hundred wlvt V ">cesses, and three hundred concu- 
bines; and his wives turned away h. V;?t. 

For it came to pass when Solomon \. that his wives turned away 

his heart after other gods; and his heai \. not perfect with the Lord 
His God as was the heart of David his faL/ 

For Solomon went after Ashtoreth, the g<^ of the Zidonians and 
after Milcom, the abomination of the Ammonite 

And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord & .d went not fui'.y after 
the Lord as did David his father. 

Then did Solomon build an high place for Chesmosh, the abomination 
of Moab, in the hill that is before Jerusalem, and for Molech, the abomi- 
nation of the children of Ammon. 

And the Lord was angry with Solomon and said unto him, for as much 
as this is done of thee and thou hast kept my covenant and my statutes, 
which I have commanded thee I will surely rend the kingdom trom thee 
and will give it to thy servants." — 1 King, 11:1-11. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor - - - Winston. N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT .... Dade City, fU. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY - Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE - - - Baltimore, Md. 

$2.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Zion s 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

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All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

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Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zton's lan&mat-h 

Bevoteb to the Cause of testis Christ 



"THE SCARLET LINE" 

"She bound the scarlet line in 
the window." — Joshua 2:21. 

What exceeding riches of grace 
are exhibited in the narrative cen- 
tering around this scarlet line. Most 
preciously is this discovered when 
we see pictured forth the marvelous 
kindness of God to poor perishing 
sinners. The twelve tribes of Israel 
with Joshua at their head are now 
entering into the possession of the 
land of promise. "And Joshua, the 
son of Nun sent out of Shittim two 
men to spy secretly, saying, Go view 
the land, even Jericho. And they 
went, and came into an harlot's 
house, named Rahab, and lodged 
there." 

Look not so disdainfully upon this 
scene, ye selfrighteous, for this is of 
the Lord. A vessel of mercy, whose 
name is in the Lamb's Book of Life, 
an object of Jehovah's everlasting 
love, is being sought out, Isaiah 
62 :12. One who to the end of time 
is set forth an object of God's dis- 
tinguishing grace, Rahab the harlot. 
When the Son of God was in the 
world in the likeness of sinful flesh, 
those who highly esteemed them- 
selves murmured that "Jesus was 
gone to be the guest of one that was 
a sinner," and they contemptuously 
designated him the friend of publi- 
cans and sinners. It is one of the 
surpassing glories of the gospel that 
Christ Jesus came into the world to 
save sinners, of whom I am chief. 1 
Tim. 1:15. 



Before the coming of these men 
Rahab had been much disturbed in 
her soul. She contemplated the 
entering in of God's host into 
Canaan as the messengers of his 
righteous vengeance. She believed 
that her people and her city were 
doomed to destruction. Then might 
Rahab say within herself, How shall 
one so wicked as I escape? The 
day declines, and the mantle of 
night begins to overshadow the 
doomed city, and there in the twi- 
light enter two strangers, men of 
the children of Israel. It is not so 
dark but that they are seen of many, 
and tidings of their presence in the 
city are taken to the king of Jericho. 

They are seen of Rahab, the har- 
lot, she knows them, too. Who can 
portray her emotions of soul as she 
beheld them? O, not, not with 
eyes and emotions of an harlot does 
she look upon them. 

Others look upon these spies with 
enmity, and would take hold of 
them with violent hands and slay 
them. But this woman is moved by 
a gracious and divine power and is 
in exercise before the Lord. She be- 
lieves that God is, and unholy, a sin- 
ner, she trembles before him; her 
heart craves his indulgent mercy, 
trembling and contrite she is drawn 
to him, and these two men are his, 
his sacred ones, for Jehovah is the 
God of Israel. She is moved to- 
ward these men because of their 
God with all graciousness of spirit. 
"She received the spies with peace." 
Heb. 11 :31. No doubt she felt un- 



18 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



worthy to lodge the representatives 
of the favored nation of the Al- 
mighty, but an inward satisfaction 
glowed within her in the honor con- 
ferred upon her that they should 
seek shelter under her roof. "He 
that receiveth you receiveth me." 
In some little measure no doubt she 
tasted this blessedness. "She re- 
ceived the spies with peace." But 
her comfort of mind in her gracious- 
ness of heart toward these Israel- 
ites is soon disturbed; it has been 
told the King of this doomed city, 
"Behold, there came men in hither 
tonight of the children of Israel, to 
search out the country. And the 
King of Jericho sent unto Rahab, 
saying, Bring forth the men that are 
come to thee, which are entered into 
thine house: for they be come to 
search out all the country." Will 
Rahab surrender them a prey to 
their ravening foes? No, she will 
shew by her works her faith in God, 
who is the King of kings. "She 
brought them up to the roof of her 
house, and hid them with the stalks 
of flax, which she had laid out in 
order upon the roof." "Wilt thou 
know, O vain man, that faith with- 
out works is dead ? " This woman's 
faith was a living faith, and her 
faith moved here to shield, to save 
these spies from the vengeance of 
the king of Jericho. Her works of 
faith were thus evidencing her jus- 
tification. "Was not Rahab, the 
harlot justified by her works, when 
she had received the messengers, 
and had sent them out another 
way?" James 2:25. The woman 
took the two men and hid them ; she 
comes down from the roof to face 
the officers of the king of Jericho, 
and said thus: "There came men un- 
to me, but I wist not whence they 
were : and it came to pass ,about the 



time of the shutting of the gate, 
when it was dark, that the men went 
out: whither the men went I wot 
not: pursue after them quickly: for 
ye shall overtake them. What is 
this? Is this the fruit of faith? 
Never! Faith in the Lord is a good 
tree that is planted and grows by 
the operation of God, and cannot 
bring forth evil fruit. "No lie is of 
the truth." 

Let us ponder over this scene of 
light and darkness, there is profit- 
able instruction in it to those who 
fear the Lord. Say not, I would 
never do so. Child of God, you 
know not how weak you are; unless 
kept by the power of God the next 
moment you will sink in the de- 
pravity of your sinful heart into all 
wickedness. 

Rahab to shield these hidden 
spies resorts to her deceiving ton- 
gue. They believe her and hasten, 
as they imagine, in pursuit of the 
fugitives without the gates of 
Jericho. The spies were benefitted 
by Rahab's lies. Was this lying ex- 
cusable? Jesuitism might answer 
affirmatively, saying, "The end jus- 
tifies the means." But an inspired 
apostle of Jesus Christ has declared 
the just damnation of all such who 
slanderously reported and affirmed 
that he said, "Let us do evil that 
good may come." Rom. 3:. 8. How 
valiantly, with what holy majesty 
this holy apostle utterly repudiates 
such a doctrine. "What shall we 
say then? Shall we continue in sin 
that grace may abound? God for- 
bid. How shall we that are dead 
to sin live any longer therein?" 
Rom. 6:1-2. If Rahab was one that 
was born of the Spirit, in whose 
heart was that faith in God which is 
the fruit of the Spirit, is it not a very 
paradox that she should upon the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



19 



roof of her house be moved by 
faith in the Lord to acts of goodness 
toward these spies, and then de- 
scending to the threshold face these 
officers of the king with cunning 
falsehoods? Is this to be winked 
at and passed over as a trifle? To 
the child of God no sin is a trifle, 
but grievous. If you are one to 
whom the Lord has given a new 
heart, all iniquity will be hateful, 
and sin not only in words and 
deeds, but in thy thoughts will make 
thee heavy and sad, and thy heart 
will sigh and mourn over it unto thy 
God. Those who are born of God 
have a nature imparted to them 
akin to the nature of God and as 
exercised by this nature, 2 Peter 
1 :4. The new man, which is created 
after the image of him that created 
him in righteousness and true holi- 
ness, Ephes 4:24, they hunger and 
thirst after righteousness. They 
cannot feast their eyes upon sin. 
This being so, the question still pre- 
sents itself. How is it that a child 
of God can this moment be exer- 
cised in love and faith worshipping 
the Lord, and in a small moment be 
exercised in matters the most sin- 
ful? Can such a state of affairs 
exist, and one in very truth be born 
of the spirit, a child of God? And 
if it be so how do such opposites 
have subsistence in them? These 
are momentous inquiries. This is 
that which is so mysterious, that 
often causes so much misgiving of 
heart to those who fear the Lord; 
that one moment exercises gracious- 
ly towards God with humble con- 
triteness of heart, or in grateful 
praises, and then all is suspended, 
and to our bitter dismay find there 
is in us a heart deceitful above all 
things and desperately wicked. O, 
the grief of mind that is ours, how 



discouraged, how we have to blush 
when once more our thoughts, our 
faces are turned toward our holy 
and merciful God. The mystery of 
these conflicting emotions and 
sometimes contradictory behavior 
felt and exhibited in the people of 
God is that they are the subjects of 
two natures, described in the scrip- 
tures as the flesh and the spirit. 
Gal. 5:16 the old, and the new man, 
Ephes. 4:22-24, and perhaps no 
clearer statement of these diverse 
principles can be found than that 
given in Rom. 7:14-25. 

All our emotions of contrition of 
heart, of faith and love and praise 
in which we worship the Lord, are 
put forth in us by the operations of 
God's gracious power. The arising 
and intrusion of iniquity is from our 
corrupt nature, our Adamic nature, 
which ever is the heart burdensome 
load of the children of God while 
they are in this world. The bitter 
consciousness of indwelling sin for- 
bids us to glory in ourselves before 
God. O, the mercifulness of the 
Lord; he pities us in our low estate, 
and by his gracious teachings we 
are melted before him in contrite- 
ness of spirit, and we are drawn to 
the sacrifice and righteousness of 
Jesus Christ as our only hope of ac- 
ceptance before the throne of God. 
How much it becomes us then to 
cry continually for mercy to be kept 
from the paths of sin. "Hold thou 
me up and I shall be safe." 

The men of Jericho are gone 
from the door of Rahab's house in 
hot pursuit of the spies elsewhere, 
and Rahab instantly ascends to the 
roof of her house. "Before the 
spies were laid down, she came un- 
to them upon the roof." Did she 
then, or in after days chuckle over 
the deception she practiced upon 



20 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



her fellow citiezns? Ah ! the mem- 
ories of sinfulness are not cherished 
by the pure in heart. What grati- 
fication can the remembrance of 
transgressions afford a believer in 
Jesus? They are ashamed of all 
iniquity. Rom. 6:21. The grace 
of God in them forbids that they 
should glory in their shame. 

"Rahab said unto the men, I 
know that the Lord hath given you 
the land, and that your terror is 
fallen upon us, and that all the in- 
habitants of the land faint because 
of you. For we have heard how 
the Lord dried up the water of the 
Red Sea for you, when ye came out 
of Egypt; and what ye did unto the 
two kings of the Amorites, that 
were on the other side of Jordon, 
Sihon and Og, whom ye utterly de- 
stroyed. And as soon as we heard 
these things, our hearts did melt, 
neither did there remain any more 
courage in any man, because of you ; 
for the Lord your God, he is God in 
heaven above, and in earth be- 
neath." 

What changes take place in this 
woman all within a little space of 
time. Moved with faith in God she 
received the spies v/ith peace, and 
sought to hide them from their foes; 
then with lies she barricades the en- 
trance of her house and turns away 
the men of Jericho; now upon the 
roof this Gentile woman is discours- 
ing most learnedly (as one surely 
taught of the Lord) concerning 
God, her faith in him, and breathes 
forth her longings that Israel, the 
people of God, would deal friendly 
with her and her father's house. 

It was Peter, and Peter's same 
natural tongue that said, "Lord, to 
whom shall we go? Thou hast the 
words of eternal life. And we be- 
lieve and are sure that thou art 



Christ, the Son of the Living God," 
John 6:68-69, and who with oaths 
and curses denied Jesus, saying, "I 
know not the man/' Matt. 26:74, 
and afterward said, "Lord, thou 
knowest all things; thou knowest 
that I love thee." John 21:17. 
"Out of the same mouth proceedeth 
blessing and cursing. My brethren, 
these things ought not so to be." 
James 3:10. Ponder these things 
in thy heart. Tidings of the on- 
ward march of the tribes of Israel, 
and of God's interposition in their 
behalf preceded their entrance in- 
to Canaan. If the waters of the 
Red Sea could not impede their 
way, if Jehovah dried up the sea 
for them, and they marched 
through the deep dry shod, if Israel 
is triumphant over both kings of the 
Amorites, who then shall withstand 
this invincible host? Terror fell up- 
on the inhabitants of the land! their 
courage fled away, and all hearts 
did melt. No one felt these things 
more deeply than Rahab, and only 
she of all the city of Jericho was ex- 
ercised graciously toward the Lord 
amidst these distressing forebod- 
ings. 

This monument of God's grace is 
so affected by his gracious power 
that she attributes the invincible 
progress of the chosen nation of the 
Lord, and she believes that their 
God who has hitherto wrought so 
effectually in their behalf will yet 
go on to display his grace unto his 
beloved people in fulfilling the cov- 
enant made with Abraham, Isaac 
and Jacob. "I know that the Lord 
hath given you the land." 

Israel got not the land in posses- 
sion by their own sword, neither 
did their own arm save them, but 
the Lord's right hand, the light of 
his countenance and his kingly fa- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



21 



vor put them in possession of their 
inheritance. All this is believed in 
the heart of Rahab, and in her re- 
<mal of God's grace and power in 
^ ffi ehalf of Israel she crowns it all 
with the acknowledgement, "the 
Lord your God, he is God in heaven 
above, and in earth beneath." In 
Rahab's view, all the Canaanitish 
gods are famished out of the land; 
she has cast their images to the 
moles and to the bats, and the Lord 
alone is exalted. 

How divine is that work in a sin- 
ner that brings him to that reverend 
and affectionate recognition of the 
living and true God. Then, though 
a sinner, worthy only of his wrath, 
he is moved to fall down and kneel 
before the Lord our Maker . 

Do you know anything of those 
matters? Rahab says, "Our hearts 
did melt, neither did there remain 
any more courage in any man." 
This spiritually is realized by the 
vessels of mercy who are called un- 
to the knowledge of themselves be- 
fpr the Almighty. All our courage 
jgfnks within us when we are appre- 
s fiended by the Lord to face the 
T "curse of the law. Our sins and just 
condemnation are brought home to 
us, and we tremble in apprehension 
ojithe execution of his coming judg- 
ment. "Because he hath appointed 
a day in which he will judge the 
world in righteousness, by that man 
whom he hath ordained." The 
risen and ascended Saviour is that 
man who is ordained to judge the 
quick and the dead at his appear- 
ing and Kingdom. Acts 17:31; 2 
Tim 4:1. 

Now, when the harlot Rahab had 
confessed to the spies her belief in 
God, her terror, the loss of all her 
courage, her meltings of heart in 
apprehension of coming judgments, 



her belief in power and gracious- 
ness of the Lord unto Israel, and 
crowned the whole with declaring 
that he only was God, then she 
pours forth her entreaties that kind- 
ness be shewn unto her and to her 
father's house. "Now therefore, I 
pray you, swear unto me by the 
Lord, since I have shewed you kind- 
ness, that you will also shew kind- 
ness unto my father's house, and 
give me a true token ; and that ye 
will save alive my father, and my 
mother, and my brethren, and my 
sisters, and all that they have and 
deliver our lives from death." Thus 
she craved their friendship and de- 
liverance from death. So, quicken- 
ed sinners make supplication unto 
the Lord for salvation, that they 
may not perish in their sins, and 
the Holy Ghost moves them to 
crave the friendship of the eternal 
God. This is a miracle of God's 
grace, that a sinner, a creature who 
in his nature is unholy, enmity 
against God, is so the workmanship 
of God, so wrought that he is found 
thirsting for God, the living God. 
His compassionate mercy is sought 
after. Oh, to be freed from sin, to 
be holy, that I might live forever 
with the Lord. God becomes so 
lovely and so loved that our hearts 
exclaim, "Whom have I in heaven 
but thee? and there is none upon 
earth that I desire beside thee." 

"Give me a true token." How 
descriptive is this language of that 
life of entreaty in which those who 
are born again live before God. Give 
me a true token of the forgiveness 
of my sins, cries the mourning soul. 
Give me a true token that thou 
Jesus art my Saviour, of my accept- 
ance in thy sight, O God. Give me 
a true token of thy covenant, ever- 
lasting love. Give me a true token 



22 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



that I am one of the chosen, that I 
am a child of God. Thus with fer- 
vency the child of God pours forth 
his supplications, and sometimes 
like Gideon (Judges 6.) we feel we 
must have token upon token to 
satisfy us. 

Oh, to find a quiet resting place 
in the sure mercies of our God. 
Give me a true token, one that will 
not fail me, that will be honored 
and accepted in that day before the 
throne of God. Give me the ear- 
nest of Spirit in my heart of that in- 
heritance, incorruptible, undefiled, 
and that fadeth not away, reserved 
in heaven for those who are kept 
by the power of God, through faith, 
unto salvation, ready to be revealed 
in the last time. Let the beloved 
Savior kiss me with the kisses of his 
mouth, for his love is better than 
wine; let him speak to my heart of 
his dying love. O, that on me 
might be put the best robe of the 
righteousness of Christ, the Son of 
God; that on my hand might be put 
the ring of the Father's everlasting 
love; the ring that should be the 
true token that I am still and for- 
ever his child; the ring of espousal, 
of eternal wedlock to the Chiefest 
among ten thousand, the One alto- 
gether lovely. Rahab's entreaty 
was heard, the spies made a cove- 
nant of life and kindness with her, 
saying, "Our life for yours." Your 
life shall be more precious than our 
own ; we will give our lives a sacri- 
fice "instead of you to die." "Our 
life for yours if ye utter not this our 
business." And it shall be, when 
the Lord hath given us the land, 
that we will deal kindly and truly 
with thee." It is such a gracious 
mystery that a lost and ruined sin- 
ner should be so wrought upon that 
he is moved, with a weeping heart 



to sue for tokens of the Lord's ten- 
der mercy, and it is very wonderful 
indeed, and surpassingly gracious 
that the Almighty inclines his ear 
and hears our cry. O, He hears 
the sighing of the needy, he will re- 
gard the prayer of the destitute, 
and not despise their prayer. "He 
forgetteth not the cry of the hum- 
ble." What encouragement is this 
for needy souls to wait upon the 
Lord. Saith Jesus, "Men ought 
always to pray, and not to faint." 

So innumerable are the weak- 
nesses and necessities of the called 
of God. And for myself I confess 
that as the days and years pass by 
they become no less, and I should 
be utterly discouraged and faint in- 
deed were it not that in prayer to 
the Lord I am enabled to cast all 
my care upon him who careth for 
me. But to do this I need the gra- 
cous operations of the Comforter to 
bring my heart to the persuasion 
that the Lord forgetteth not the cry 
of the humble, tho I am divine- 
ly constrained to come boldly unto 
the throne of grace to obtain mercy, 
and find grace to help in time of 
need. Rahab believes the spies; 
and their covenant promises are in- 
spiring and satisfying, and she mani- 
fests her grateful acquiescence by 
facilitating their escape from Jeri- 
cho. "Then she let them down by a 
cord through the window: for her 
house was upon the town wall, and 
she dwelt upon the wall. And she 
said upon them. Get you to the 
mountain, lest the pursuers meet 
you; and hide yourselves there 
three days, until the pursuers be re- 
turned, and afterward may ye go 
your way. And the men said unto 
her,We will be blameless of this 
thine oath which thou hast made us 
swear. Behold, when we come in- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



to the land, thou shalt bind this line 
of scarlet thread in the window 
which thou didst let us down by; 
and thou shalt bring thy father, 
and thy mother, and thy brethren, 
and all thy father's household, 
home unto thee. And it shall be, 
that whosoever shall go out of the 
doors of thy house into the street, 
his blood shall be upon his head, 
and we will be guiltless, and what- 
soever shall be with thee in the 
house, his blood shall be on our 
head, if any hand be upon him. And 
if thou utter this our business, then 
we will be quit of thine oath which 
thou hast made us swear. And she 
said, According unto your words, 
so be it. And she sent them away, 
and they departed: And she bound 
the scarlet line in the window." 

Rahab received and sent away 
the spies in peace. They are her 
friends, her sworn friends, for they 
have sworn unto her by the Lord, 
calling Him to witness and to estab- 
lish the covenant between them. 
When in dire needs, when in the 
deeps, when as outcasts, as the vil- 
est, the chief of sinners, distracted 
with hellish temptations, what shall 
satisfy us, inspire us once more to 
hope for salvation? 

If for help we must look to our 
creature resources, then we must 
despair, for we have learned, and 
are still learning in our soul's humil- 
iations that we are without strength. 
Must then the chief of sinners per- 
ish? Our hope is in the new cove- 
nant, in Jesus' precious blood. 
"The secret of the Lord is with them 
that fear Him, and He will shew 
them His covenant." O ! a sight of 
this by faith will be as streams in 
the desert; here we shall find our 
strong consolations. Hearken to 
one of the ambassadors of Christ, 



"Wherein God, willing more abund- 
antly to shew unto the heirs of 
promise the immutability of His 
counsel, confirmed it by an oath; 
that by two immutable things, in 
which it was impossible for God to 
lie, we might have a strong consola- 
tion, who have fled for refuge to lay 
hold upon the hope set before us: 
which hope we have as an anchor of 
the soul both sure and steadfast, 
and which entereth into that within 
the veil; whither the Forerunner is 
for us entered, even Jesus, made an 
high priest forever after the order 
of Melchisedec." Heb.6 :17-20. O, ye 
tried ones, here we have the sworn, 
and sure mercies of David. This is 
admitting us into the secret of the 
presence, the sanctuary of God, this 
is opening to us the bosom thoughts 
of the Eternal God, and our Heaven- 
ly Father. Here Jehovah is reveal- 
ed contemplating the woes and 
weaknesses of his people, and he is 
overflowing in his love and pity to 
ward them. O, ponder each word : 
"Wherein God, willing more abun- 
dantly to shew unto the heirs of 
promise the immutability of his 
counsel, confirmed it by an oath." 

The two spies are a lively repre- 
sentation of the ministers of Christ. 
"Behold, when we come into the 
land thou shalt bind this line of scar- 
let thread in the window." This, 
O Rahab, shall be the "true token" 
unto thee that thou shalt not perish, 
and that we will deal kindly and 
truly with thee. Rahab has faith 
in the God of Israel, she has faith in 
these two spies, and she has faith in 
the token they have given her, and 
obedient to her faith, "She bound 
the scarlet line in the window." No 
doubt she often looked upon this 
scarlet line with tears of gratitude 
to the Lord. The true token quiet- 



24 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ed her fears, and was her support 
until the day of her salvation, and 
thus within her heart she might 
speak. Who am I that I should be 
singled out to be remembered with 
the favor that the Lord bears unto 
His people, that I should be saved, 
that I shall rejoice with the gladness 
of thy nation, and glory with thine 
inheritance? O Jericho! fair and 
beautiful in thy situation, thou city 
of palm trees. No longer I love 
thee, city of my nativity, city of my 
harlotry. Thou art an offense to 
me; O let mine eyes be turned 
from thee, let mine eyes feast upon 
this "Scarlet Line," true token of 
the covenant of life and friendship 
with the Lord, and with his chosen. 
My heart is toward thee, O Israel, 
beloved of the Lord. O, mine eyes 
and my yearning heart are unto 
thee, O Lord God of Israel. 

"Witness, all ye host of heaven, 
My Redeemer's tenderness; 
Love I much? I've much forgiven, 
In a miracle of grace." 

The line of scarlet thread was 
the true token between Rahab and 
the Israelites. Let us now consider 
its signification unto us in the gos- 
pel. 

The scarlet line is a figure of the 
precious blood of Christ, the Lamb 
of God. This scarlet line of Jesus' 
blood runs through the holy scrip- 
tures from Genesis to Revelation, 
and has been, and will be to the end 
of time ever gloriously manifested 
in the faith of God's elect. By 
faith Abel offered unto God of the 
firstlings of his flock, Gen. 4:4, a 
more excellent sacrifice than Cain. 
Abel looked forth out of the window 
of his faith, and in his looking unto 
and worship of God there was, in 



the shed blood of the Lamb the scar- 
let line bound in the window. 

The Lord thus early gave the 
scarlet line of blood unto his people, 
who through grace given unto them 
worship him in Spirit and in truth. 
Noah displayed the scarlet line 
when on coming out of the ark he 
builded an altar unto the Lord, and 
took of every clean beast, and of ev- 
ery clean fowl, and offered burnt 
offerings on the altar. Gen. 7:20-21. 
This was all acceptable unto God, 
and was fragrant as sweet flowers. 
The sacrifice of Christ is of a sweet 
smelling savor unto God, and to 
sinners called by grace. Ephes. 5:2. 
Job presented continually before 
the Lord the scarlet line; in behalf 
of himself and his family. Job 1 :5. 
Abraham often shed the red blood 
in his sacrifices to the Lord, Gen. 
12:8, and he gave utterance to a 
glorious prophesy concerning the 
scarlet line, saying, "My son, God 
will provide Himself a lamb for a 
burnt offering." Gen. 22:8. Isaac 
and Jacob displayed in their wor- 
ship the scarlet line of blood. Gen. 
26:25; 31:54. Then Israel and his 
household went down into Egypt 
and sojourned there, but during the 
long night of bondage of the twelve 
tribes the scarlet line was only dim- 
ly seen, the Israelites were general- 
ly sunken in idolatry, and when they 
would have worshipped the Lord 
with the scarlet line, it was not meet 
to do so in Egypt, for the Egyptians 
would slay them. Exod. 8:26. But 
on the last night of their bondage in 
the land, a night to be much remem- 
bered, behold on all the houses of 
Israel the token of the scarlet line of 
the blood of the Passover Lamb ! 
The blood shall be to you for a 
token upon the houses where ye are : 
and when I see the blood, I will pass 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



2 b 



over you, and the plague shall not 
be upon you to destroy you, when 
I smite the land of Egypt." Exod. 
12:13. Thenceforth in that favor- 
ed nation magnificently the scarlet 
line was exhibited. Every day, in 
the morning and in the evening, a 
lamb was slain. Exod. 29 :38-39. In 
the yearly commemoration of the 
Passover, on the great day of Atone- 
ment, Lev. 16, in all the multitude 
of personal offerings, in all the 
typical worship of the Almighty so 
signally prominent is the scarlet line 
of the blood of beasts shed for the 
remission of sins. Now, we come 
to God by the blood drawn from Em- 
manuel's veins, by this precious 
blood we are made nigh to God. 
Ephes. 2:13. We are come to Jesus, 
the Mediator of the new covenant, 
and to the blood of sprinkling that 
speaketh better things than that of 
Abel. 

But that scarlet line bound in the 
window of Rahab, the harlot, was 
unintelligible to the inhabitants of 
Jericho, it had no voice to them. 
All the tribes of Israel that encom- 
passed the city could read its mean- 
ing and thus they interpreted that 
line of scarlet thread. "There up- 
on the wall is the house of the bless- 
ed, while all the rest of Jericho is 
accursed. This is the household to 
whom we are related in covenant 
bonds, and in the day of Jericho's 
doom this house shall stand. Thou, 
O Rahab, and all thine, shall be 
saved, and we will deal kindly and 
truly with thee." So, to multitudes 
today, the scarlet line of Christ's 
blood has no signification, they turn 
aside from it as from a thing of 
naught, but to believers Jesus' blood 
is exceeding precious. Have you 
heard the voice of Jesus blood, poor 
sinner, in your heart? 



His blood speaks so blessedly to 
the children of God; it declares 
their at-one-ment with God. This 
then is the signification of the scar- 
let line of blood that runs all 
through the scriptures. 

"It is the blood that maketh 
atonement for the soul." Lev. 17 :14. 
In our earthly standing we are far 
off from God, depraved and vile, 
ouscasts, for we are "alienated and 
enemies in our minds by wicked 
works." Col. 1:21. Is this an 
overdrawn picture? Ah no, as you 
are taught of God your eyes will be 
opened to see, and your heart will 
painfully feel that the description is 
so dreadfully true ; and then with 
what heartfelt appreciation you will 
cleave to the blood of atonement. 
Christ Jesus in his great love hath 
reconciled us to God in the body of 
his flesh through death, to present 
us holy, unblamable, and unreprov- 
able in his sight. Could anything 
be better? No wonder that we 
cleave to the scarlet line and bind it 
fast in the window. Our gracious 
God laid our iniquities upon his dear 
Son, and He gave Himself a sacri- 
fice for our sin, and poured out His 
soul unto death; thus He put away 
all our sins, shedding for us His 
reconciling blood. 2 Chron. 29:25; 
Heb. 2:17. O, it is so comforting 
to look upon the scarlet line, and its 
voice is so sweet to a poor sinner's 
heart. 

"Do you believe in the Scarlet 
Line of Jesus Blood? It speaks to 
the believer of his redemption, and 
that all his sins are forgiven. Ephes- 
ians 1:7. The blood of the Lamb 
cleanses us from all sin, and in this 
fountain opened for sin and un~ 
cleanness, we are washed and made 
whiter than snow. Psalm 51:7. 



26 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



We are justified by Jesus blood, 
we are saved from wrath through 
him. The Scarlet Line gives us the 
victory over all the powers of dark- 
ness, it stops the mouth of the ac- 
cuser. Rev. 12:11. The Scarlet 
line of Christ's blood is faith's song 
in the believer's heart, and it will 
be our theme in glory. This line of 
scarlet thread lines all the way from 
sin to holiness and God, from bond- 
age to eternal liberty. O, Em- 
manuel's precious blood has conse- 
crated all the way from earth to 
heaven, Heb. 10:19, and thus we 
draw nigh to God, ever looking with 
all affection to this scarlet line. If 
the scarlet line, Christ's precious 
blood is so significant, what shall 
the child of God do without it? Look 
once more at the picture portrayed 
upon the walls of Jericho. There 
stands the house of one who receiv- 
ed, and sent away in peace the two 
spies; and at the window, she 
stands, Rahab the harlot, with hope 
welling up in her heart, with eager 
hands of faith and love she binds 
the scarlet line in the window. 

Daniel kneeled down upon his 
knees three times a day, and prayed 
and gave thanks before his God, his 
windows being open in his chamber 
toward Jerusalem. Dan 6:10. 
There was a window in the ark, 
Gen. 6:16, and the ransomed of the 
Lord fly as a cloud, and as doves 
to their windows. Isaiah 60:8. 
Shall we look upon this window in 
Rahab's house as expressive of the 
worship of God? Whenever Ra- 
hab looked forth, there to her 
heart's comfort and delight she be- 
held the scarlet line bound in the 
window. So in the window of the 
believer's prayers and praises unto 
God the scarlet line is seen. In 
seasons, when guilt is so conscious 



to our spirit, when accusations roll 
in upon us like a flood, when sin 
stained, with a wounded heart, and 
with a blushing face, how shall we 
look forth at the window unto the 
Lord? Ah! when in my soul's 
conflicts, when so buffetted by my 
sins and Satan, imploringly I 
would look unto God, let the Holy 
Spirit ever instruct me to bind the 
scarlet line in the window. Let 
others aspire after the fleeting 
things of earth, after wealth and 
fame, give, O give to me, a perish- 
ing sinner, a true token of thy ever- 
lasting love ; give me, O Lord, the 
scarlet line, the priceless token, the 
blood of the New Testament, shed 
for the remission of sins. 

"She bound the scarlet line in the 
window. God commanded Israel 
to bind His words for a sign upon 
their hand, and they shall be front- 
lets between thine eyes. Deut. 6:9. 
Solomon says, "My son, keep thy 
father's commandment, and for- 
sake not the law of thy mother; 
bind them continually upon thine 
heart, and tie them about thy neck. 
When thou goest it shall lead thee; 
when thou sleepest, it shall keep 
thee; and when thou awakest it 
shall talk with thee." Prov. 6:20-22. 

So, the called of God are effec- 
tually taught to bind in their win- 
dow the scarlet line of the Savior's 
precious blood. 

FREDERICK W. KEENE, 
(Continued in next issue) 



EASTERN LITTLE RIVER UNION. 

The next session of the Eastern Little 
River Union will meet with Bethany 
Church, Johnston Co., N. C, on Saturday 
and 5th Sunday in Dec. 1929. Elder J. T. 
Collier is appointed to preach the intro- 
ductory sermon. Eld. T. F. Adams was 
apnointed his alternate. Brethren, sisters, 
friends, and ministers especially are cor- 
dially invited to attend. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



27 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy lathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIIL '. No. 2 

Entered at the postoftice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSON, N. C. DEC. 1, 1929 



ASSOCIATIONS. 

The writer has given most of his 
ministerial life to the service of 
churches, with an occasional visit to 
some one of our many associations. 

The past summer and fall months, 
it has been my pleasure to attend 
part or all of the sessions of the fol- 
lowing associations, Lower Country 
Line, Upper Country Line, Pig River, 
Staunton River, New River, Fisher's 
River, Salem and Bear Creek. We 
had 49 ministers in attendance in 
the Lower Country Line which met 
in Durham, N. C. There were a 
large number of ministers who at- 
tended the Pig River, which met in 
Roanoke, Va., and a goodly number 
of ministers attended all the eight 
associations mentioned above. 

It was my privilege to speak in 
the name of the Lord of Hosts, dur- 
ing the limited time spent attending 
the several associations, except in 
New River, where I was favored to 
hear along with other publicans and 
sinners. 



This brief reference to associa- 
tions is made in order to say, that; 
as a whole, the preaching was as 
much in harmony as it has ever been 
my privilege to hear. The conver- 
sation, both public and private, has 
tended to show that most of our peo- 
ple long for peace and order, and 
that they are willing to bestow the 
mantle of charity over the weaker 
brothers faults, remembering that 
none are perfect. 

It is with regret that some of our 
general corespondence has been 
dropped or suspended for various 
reasons. Let us hope that minor 
troubles may be kept localized and 
that a spirit of Christ like forbear- 
ance, may so abound that our peo- 
ple may be united in love and fel- 
lowship as the followers of the 
Lord. 

We should not lose sight of the 
sovereignty of the churches. If 
ministers, who are sound in doctrine 
and orderly in practice, should be 
held in bondage for preaching in 
churches or for churches that are 
orderly, it will bring upon us much 
needless sorrow and alienation to no 
profit. 

The individual church not only 
has the right to discipline its mem- 
bership, in accord with orderly 
Bible proceedure; but it has the 
right to decide as to when and by 
whom it shall have preaching ser- 
vices. 

As editor of the Landmark I want 
to set at rest questioning as to why 
appointments are permitted to be 
published through the Landmark 
for this, that or the other minister. 

A minister's gift will make room 
for him, if it is of the Lord; but a 
minister may be welcome and dou- 
bly welcomed in some churches, and 
not wanted, especially, in other 



28 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



churches. Our people, as a rule, 
are a busy people and it does not 
always suit them to have appoint- 
ments at any and all times, without 
being consulted. 

No one minister is expected to fit 
in and be fully appreciated at all 
times and places and under all cir- 
cumstances; but how can the Land- 
mark publishers, know just when or 
just where a minister should go? 

Let us, in all fairness, lay down 
this rule; that, if a minister is con- 
sidered in order at home and no 
charges have been preferred in gos- 
pel order, that would disqualify 
him temporarily or permanently, 
that we accept and publish appoint- 
ments for him, at his risk, and if an 
appointment is made at some 
church or churches, that do not care 
to have the minister speak at the 
time and place appointed, that the 
mere matter of the publication of 
such an appointment in the Land- 
mark or other publication does not 
bind the church to publish such ap- 
pointments. Personally, I have 
made very few appointments 
through any publication; but allow 
me to say once for all the future, 
that if an appointment should be 
published for me to speak in any 
church where I have not been in- 
vited in the proper order, such a 
church should use its own discretion 
and preference as to my filling such 
a voluntary appointment. 

If my brother editors do not con- 
cur in this frank statement, they 
are at liberty to say so either direct- 
ly or through the Landmark. 

To all brethren who complain of 
the Landmark making appoint- 
ments for those who are not in de- 
mand and whose visits they prefer 
not to have, this should be a satis- 



factory answer from the Landmark 
editors and publishers. 

Yours in hope, 

O. J. DENNY. 



THE MAN WHO PREACHES THE 
GOSPEL IS CALLED OF GOD. 

The scriptures teach that the 
Lord gave gifts unto men, that the 
church might be complete in doc- 
trine, knowledge and order. In 
Eph. 4:11 five different kinds of 
gifts are mentioned; and in 1 Cor. 
12:28 eight are mentioned. These 
all ceased at the death of the Apos- 
tles, most likely, except the evange- 
list, teacher and pastor. It is to be 
feared that the church has allowed 
some men to enter the ministry, 
who were manifestly mistaken in 
their calling. If one is suffered to 
preach who is not called he will 
bore the church, hurt the cause, 
and being misplaced, he is useless. 
Possibly he might have made a 
good deacon, or an active and use- 
ful layman. The truly called is 
never a volunteer, he is a conscript; 
and while he feels his insufficiency, 
he fears a curse will rest upon him 
if he utterly refuses, coupled with a 
woe if he preach not the gospel. It 
may seem strange to the natural 
mind that he who is divinely called 
should so humbly feel his unfitness 
for the sacred work; while the 
free-willer is prompted to engage in 
the ministry from a spirit of pride 
and vain glory. From this zeal, if 
a brother should ask him, if he had 
impressions to preach, it will so in- 
flate his mind with the thoughts of 
preaching that he cannot enjoy the 
preaching of any one so long as he 
is not so privileged. Such a one is 
often burdened, not with the word 
of God, but as to what the church 
and some preachers think of his 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



29 



preaching. He is ever ready to 
tell of his dreams, visions, and great 
burdens about preaching. Who 
is there among us that has heard 
these things told often, and yet the 
hallucinator never did preach the 
gospel? After all the best evidence 
that man can give that he is called 
of God to preach, is that he does 
preach the gospel to the comfort 
and edification of the church. 

It is a custom of some churches 
to license a man to preach before 
his gift is known, or is manifest for 
ordination to the gospel ministry. 
This done the candidate makes ap- 
pointments and visits the sister 
churches and associations. Through 
courtesy to his church he is preach- 
ed here and there. It does not 
seem to be scriptural to do so be- 
fore his home church has proved 
him. I have known of some men 
thus exercising during their church 
life and never ordained. There 
have been men licensed to preach, 
who have been ordained, because 
some friend or relative united with 
the church and requested such a one 
to baptize him, or some church had 
no pastor, and wanted him ordain- 
ed for that purpose, who never 
preached the gospel or had the 
scriptural qualifications of a min- 
ister as given by Paul. It is a bad 
policy to license one to preach, for 
it is a rare thing to rescind the act, 
it matters not how far short he falls. 
Evidently a man's gift maketh room 
for him, bringeth him before great 
men — the church and ministry who 
should be able to judge his gift. 
When the Lord prepares a man ac- 
cording to his own heart, he shall 
feed the church with knowledge 
and understanding, then He will by 
the Holy Spirit awaken such con- 
victions in the mind of his servant, 



and in the mind of his church or 
brethren concerning him. 

I have been asked more than 
once by a dear brother, who was 
practicing preaching, if I thought 
he was called of God to the work. 
If I had come to a deliberate con- 
clusion that he was about his Mas- 
ter's calling, I took pleasure to en- 
courage him in his work; but if not, 
I could not do so without conscious 
guilt. It has caused me pain some- 
times to say, I think you have mis- 
taken your calling. Some have 
thanked me, and some have become 
my enemy for so saying. 

I think the church should be 
faithful when she becomes satisfied 
that a dear brother is not fitted for 
the work, and frankly tell him so. 
But some brethren will say, if a 
brother just wants to preach, just 
let him preach if he can get people 
to hear him. Brethren should love 
the cause better than to want to 
gratify the whim of any brother. 
Doubtless, if the church and God- 
called elders had been more care- 
ful upon whom they laid their 
hands on to preach, we would have 
had more unity and less divisions in 
our ranks; and, a more earnest and 
spiritual ministry. We would have 
had a far less number of preachers 
drawing good brethren after their 
itching theories, and contrary to the 
form of sound words, to the subvert- 
ing of gospel faith and Christian 
fellowship among many brethren. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



EATING THE FLESH AND 
DRINKING THE BLOOD. 

I have been requested to write 
.something about eating the flesh 
and drinking the blood of the Son 
of man, recorded in the 6th. chapter 
of the gospel by John. And first 



30 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



of all I wish to quote the 63rd 
verse of this chapter. "It is the 
spirit that quickeneth ; the flesh 
profiteth nothing; the words that I 
speak unto you, they are spirit, and 
they are life." This tells us beyond 
all question what it is that makes 
dead sinners alive. All sinners are 
in their nature dead in trespasses 
and sins, and no dead sinner eats 
Spiritual food. "Ye must be born 
again." The sinner born again is 
no longer a dead sinner, but a living 
sinner. Jesus had just fed the mul- 
titude with bread and fish and with- 
drawn himself, and his disciples 
had gone over the sea in a ship. And 
the people went over seeking for 
Jesus, and he said, "Ye seek me not 
because of the miracles, but because 
ye did eat of the loaves and were 
filled," and then said, "Labor not 
for the meat which perisheth but 
for that meat which endureth unto 
everlasting life." All living crea- 
tures need to be fed and the Lord 
satisfies the desire of every living 
thing. Psalm 145:16. As this is 
true naturally it is true spiritually. 
The children of God are living crea- 
tures, 2 Cor. 5:17, and therefore 
must be fed and the Lord has pro- 
vided the food, and as they are 
spiritual creatures they need and 
must have spiritual food. 

"My God shall supply all your 
need, according to his riches in glory 
by Christ Jesus." Phil. 4:19. All 
that the children of God need he 
has provided in Jesus. He is the 
food. He is drink. He is rest. God 
hath made him unto us wisdom, 
righteousness, sanctification, and 
redemption. 1st. Cor. 1:30. We 
know that Jesus did not mean that 
any one must literally eat his flesh 
and drink his blood. If so we 
should have some evidence of their 



doing it. Yet "Except ye eat the 
flesh and drink the blood of the Son 
of man ye have no life in you." 
John 6:53. This is the bread that 
cometh down from heaven and giv- 
eth life unto the world. Not the 
world that hates Jesus and his peo- 
ple, but that especially chosen and 
spiritual world in which heaven 
born souls live. Jesus, as God is a 
quickening Spirit, and dead sinners 
hear his voice and live, as the Son 
of man, or as God manifest in the 
flesh He sustains the life which He 
as a Spirit gives. Jesus said in the 
tenth chapter of John, "The thief 
cometh not, but for to steal, and to 
kill, and to destroy; I am come that 
ye might have life, and that ye 
might have it more abundantly." 
John 10:10. Jesus is the very life 
of his people. "When Christ, who 
in our life, shall appear, then shall 
ye also appear with him in glory." 
Col. 3 :4. So He is both the giver of 
life and the sustainer of life. The 
child of God would become dull and 
sickly if Jesus did not come again 
and again and renew the evidences 
of His love to them, though they 
have seen Him and heard Him and 
have administered to Him in doing 
good to His humble poor. Yet 
they now and then find themselves 
in a comfortless condition. They 
cannot appropriate anything to 
themselves and fear that they are 
mistaken in the whole matter; but 
blessed be God. Jesus said, "I will 
not leave you comfortless. I will 
come to you." John 14:1. And it 
is in these love visits that He gives 
His loved ones to see and feel that 
it was for them that He became 
poor and suffered in the flesh as a 
man, meeting and overcoming in His 
flesh every temptation that they en- 
dure, and but for this suffering in 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



31 



the flesh they would perish in their 
sins. It is in this way, and now, 
that they eat the flesh and drink 
the blood of the Son of man, and 
what a sweet morsel it is. It gives 
such strength and assurance as en 
ables them to adopt the language 
of the poet and say, "This is my 
dear, delightful theme, that Jesus 
died for me." The felt sense of the 
fact that Jesus, by assuming all our 
sin and sorrow and felt our weak- 
ness in his flesh. "For though He 
was crucified through weakness, yet 
He liveth by the power of God. For 
wo also are weak in Him, but we 
shall live with Him by the power of 
God toward you." 2 Cor. 13:4. 

Jesus suffered all our weakness 
and yet was filled with all the full- 
ness of God, and so lived a life of 
perfect obedience to God, and im- 
puted His righteousness to His loved 
ones and they feast upon Him and 
live by the faith of the Son of God 
who loved us and gave Himself for 
us. 

"Blessed are they which do hun- 
ger and thirst after righteousness, 
for they shall be filled."— Matt. 5:6. 

Thank God. May he ever feed us. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



ELDER STEPHENSON NEEDS 
HELP. 

Elder L. H. Stephenson of Willow 
Springs, N. C, Route No. 1 has re- 
cently lost severely by fire, and 
needs all the assistance he can se- 
cure. 

For years he has been a faithful 
servant of the Lord, serving his 
churches. Already involved with 
mortgages on his farm this fire is a 
distressing blow and unless he re- 
ceives assistance he will lose his 
farm. 

We are sending him $10.00 and 



will acknowledge all subscriptions 
through the Landmark. 

JOHN D. GOLD. 



ANNEE MA YE HARRELL. 

By the request of relatives I will try to 
write the obituary of Miss Annie Maye 
Harrell. She was the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Albert Harrell. She 
was born at Pinetops, N. C, Feb. 11, 1908 
and died April 6, 1929, at the home of her 
father near Elm City, N. C, making her 
stay on earth just a little over 21 years. 
She had been in declining health for quite 
a while prior to her death; but bore her 
sufferings with the quiet, gentle, cheer- 
ful spirit that she always possessed. All 
was done for her by loving tender hands 
that seemed possible to be done, but she 
rrradually grew weaker and when the 
death angel beckoned to her, I feel that 
she was ready to go. I was told that she 
bid her mother and father goodbye and 
said she had something she wanted to tell 
them but could not talk enough to tell 
them. It seems that when one has always 
been good and dutiful in every respect and 
suffered as much and as long as she did 
that there could be nothing but happiness 
for them after death. 

She leaves a broken-hearted father and 
mother, three sisters, Mary Lee, Elma, and 
Rebecca, four brothers Alex, Wilson, Cur- 
tis, and Norman, Annie Maye being the old- 
est of the children. She also leaves a host 
of sorrowing relatives and friends. 

The funeral was preached from the 
home by Elder J. B. Denson of Rocky 
Mount. He spoke many words of comfort 
to the bereaved family. Elder A. M. 
Crisp, of Pinetops. officiated at the grave. 

The pallbearers and flower girls were 
friends of Miss Harrell and were as fol- 
lows: Messrs. Harvey Williford, Sam Wil- 
liams, Sharpe and Arpe Newton, Johnnie 
Webb, and Frank Williams. The flowers 
were in charge of Mrs. Tom Batts of Wil- 
son and Mrs. John Cherry. The flower 
sirls were Misses Lela Bobbitt, Thelma 
Whitehead, Mvrtie Williford, Amanda 
Williams, Grace, Nell and Emily Williford, 
Elsie Sharpe, Mrs. Tom Batts and Mrs. 
Mark Bullock. Annie Maye was laid to 
rest at the family burying ground near 
Macclesfield, Sunday afternoon, April 7, 
amid a large concourse of grief stricken 
relatives and friends. The floral offer- 
ings were mute emblems of the esteem 
with which she was held. She was always 
obedient to her parents, and was loved by 
hor schoolmates and friends for her beau- 
tiful character. Those who knew her best 
loved her most. I have never heard a 
word against her in any way. Every one 
alway spoke well of Annie Maye. A good 
name is rather to be chosen than great 
riches. 

We all mourn the premature death of 
one so pure, fair and promising but God in 
his infinite wisdom doeth a\\ things well. 



32 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



To the bereaved family we extend our sin- 
cerest sympathy and commend them to 
God from whom all comforts and blessings 
come. 

O cease, fond nature, cease to mourn, 

And let our Saviour's will 
Be ours in all things here below, 

Then we should fear no ill. 

Written by, 

ELSIE SHARPE, 

Elm City, N. C. 



UNION MEETING AT MIDDLE CREEK. 

The next session of the Angier Union is 
appointed to be held with the Church at 
Middle Creek, Wake County, Saturday and 
fifth Sunday in December, 19 29. Elder 
E. C. Jones has been chosen to preach the 
introductory sermon and Elder L. H. 
Stephenson is alternate. 

Middle Creek Church is located about 
nine miles southeast from Garner, and is 
about eleven miles north east from Angier. 

All lovers of Truth are invited to meet 
with us, especially the ministering 
brethren. 

W. F. YOUNG, 

Union Clerk. 

Angier, N. C. 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE UNION. 

The next session of the Upper Country 
Line Union will be held, the Lord willing, 
with the church at Reidsville, N. C, on the 
5th Sunday and Saturday before in Decem- 
ber, 1929. 

Elder O. J. Denny was chosen to preach 
the introductory sermon (Saturday morn- 
ing 11 o'clock). 

The public is cordially invited to attend 
this meeting, especially ministers. 

ELDER W. C. KING, 
Union Clerk. 



LOWER COUNTRY UNION. 

The Lower Country Union will be held, 
the Lord willing, with the church at 
Mount Zions, Halifax Co., Va., on the 5th 
Sunday and Saturday before in December, 
19 29. Brethren, sisters and friends 
are cordially invited to come and be with 
us, especially ministers. 

This church building is located about 
three miles north of Virgilina, Va. 

A. P. CLAYTON, 

Union Clerk. 



THE EASTERN UNION. 

The Eastern Union is to be held with 
the Church at Concord to commence Sat- 
urday before the fifth Sunday in December. 
All orderly Primitive Baptists are invited 
to come and be with us. We hope to have 
a full representation of the churches com- 
posing the union. We cordially invite our 
ministering brethren to come. 

A. W. AMBROSE, Clerk. 
Creswell, N. C. 



ELDER SAMUEL McMILLON. 

Elder Samuel McMillon of High Point, 
N. C, will preach as follows: 

Burlington Church, Friday night, Dec. 
6th. 

Mebane, Saturday and Second Sunday, 
Dec. 7th and 8th. 

Roxboro, Second Sunday night. 

Prospect Hill, Monday, Dec. 9th. 

Wheeler's, Tuesday, Dec. 10th. 

Helena, Wednesday, Dec. 11th. 

Durham, Wednesday night. 

Raleigh in Bro. D. W. Butts' home, 
Thursday night, Dec. 12th. 

Willow Springs, Friday, Dec. 13. 

Little Creek, Saturday and third Sun- 
day, Dec. 14th and 15th. 

Angier, Sunday night, Dec. 15th. 

Fellowship, Monday, Dec. 16th. 

Gift, Tuesday night, Dec. 17th. 



ELDER J. W. WYATT. 

Elder J. W. Wyatt will preach at the 
following times and places: 

Elm City December the 8th at night. 

Upper Town Creek the 9th. 

Tarboro the 10th. 

Bear Grass the 11th. 

Smithwicks Creek the 12th. 

Washington the 13th. 

Sandy Grove the 14th and 15th. 

Cedar Island the 17th. 

Hunting Quarter the 18th. 

Goose Creek 21st and 22d. 

Kinston the 23rd at night. 



ELDER TILLMAN SAWYER. 

Please publish in the Zion's Landmark 
the following appointments for Elder 
Tillman Sawyer. 

Little Vine, Friday, Dec. 13, 1929. 

Dunn, Saturday, and third Sunday, Dec. 
14, 15. 

Primitive Zion, Monday. 

Bethsaida, Tuesday. 

Corinth, Wednesday. 

Mingo, Thursday. 

Oak Forest, Friday. 

Hickory Grove, Saturday. 
. Reedy Prong, Sunday. 

Seven Mill, Monday. 

Hornett, Tuesday. 

Durham, Wednesday at night. 

Camp Creek, Thursday. 

Tar River, Friday. 

Surles, Saturday. 

Flat River, Sunday. 

Helena, Monday. 

Roxboro, Tuesday, at night. 

Wheelers, Wednesday, Jan 1, 1930. 

Prospect, Thursday. 

Harmony, Friday. 

Gilliam's, Sunday. 

Pleasant Grove, Monday. 

Reidsville, Tuesday at night. 

Wolf Island, Wednesday. 

Dan River, Thursday. 

Danville, Va., Friday at night. 

Axton, Va., Saturday and the second 
Sunday. 
Ayden, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

■ AT : 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIII. DEC. 15, 1929 No. 3 



GOD PUNISHING SOLOMON FOR HIS DISOBEDIENCE. 



"And the Lord stirred up an adversary unto Solomon, Hadad the 
Edomite: he was of the king's seed in Edom. 

For it came to pass when David was in Edom, and Joab the captain of 
the host was gone up to bury the slain, after he had smitten every male 
in Edom; 

That Hadad fled, he and certain Edomites of his father's servants with 
him to go into Egypt; Hadad being yet a little child. 

And they arose out of Midian, and came to Paran: and they took men with 
them out of Paran, and they came to Egypt, unto Pharaoh king of Egypt; 
which gave him an house, and appointed him victuals and gave him land. 

And Hadad found great favor in the sight of Pharaoh so that he gave 
him to wife the sister of his own wife, the sister of Taphenes the queen. 

And the sister of Tahpenes bare him Genubath his son, whom Tahpenes 
weaned in Pharaoh's house: and Genubath was in Pharaoh's household 
among the sons of Pharaoh. 

And when Hadad heard in Egypt that David slept with his fathers, and 
that Joab the captain of the host was dead, Hadad said to Pharaoh, Let 
me depart, that I may go to mine own country. — 1 Kings 11:14-22. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY. Editor - - - Winston, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L GILBERT .... Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER a a DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE - - - Baltimore, Md. 



92.*0 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Zions 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should itate both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 

truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zton's Xanfcmarfc 

Devoted to tbe Cause of ^esus Christ 



"THE SCARLET LINE" 

(Continued from last issue) 

Examine yourself whether you 
have the scarlet line bound in the 
window, for that religion which 
lacks that personal, experimental 
knowledge of the blood of Christ, is 
valueless before God. The elect 
are chosen unto the sprinkling of 
the blood of Jesus. 1 Peter 1 :2. 
Without this scarlet line we can- 
not know our election of God. What 
have you bound in your window? 
Is it your self -righteousness? What! 
filthy rags? Isaiah 64:6. Some 
bind in the window of their religious 
profession their supposed work for 
the Lord, the many wonderful 
works, which they declare they have 
done for Christ. Such religionists 
very fitly sing to themselves, 

"A charge to keep I have, 
A God to glorify, 

A never dying soul to save, 
And fit it for the sky." 

But Christ will say in that day, 
"Depart from me, all ye workers of 
iniquity." Luke 13:27. 

Others display in their windows 
the doctrines of men, and the doc- 
trines of devils, some, in the mere 
theory may mention Christ's blood, 
but their non-experimental, heart- 
less religion will avail them nothing 
in the day of God's wrath. But 
you, poor gouls, who feel so un- 
worthy, linful, polluted, who long 
for freedom from all sin, whose 
hearts crave reconciliation with 
God in the free remission of all your 
sins, to you how sacred is the scar- 



let line. With all desire you con- 
template Emmanuel's blood, and 
muse upon its efficacious fruit with 
all affection, (yielding to believers, 
so richly, redemption and forgive- 
ness of sin, and everlasting peace 
with God) so with believing hands 
you bind the scarlet line in the win- 
dow. "Wash me Saviour, or I die." 
The language in Leviticus 1-3, is 
very descriptive of the spirit in 
which God's people worship him in 
the shedding of blood. "He shall 
offer it of his own voluntary will, 
at the door of the tabernacle of the 
congregation before the Lord." 

It is written, "Thy people shall be 
willing in the day of thy power." 
Psalm 110-3. So we are brought 
with all willingness of heart to bind 
the scarlet line in the window. 

Let us return to Jericho, and 
glance again at what is transacting 
there. "Now Jericho was straitly 
shut up because of the children of 
Israel: none went out, and none 
came in." Joshua 6:1. Once a day 
for six days the men of war com- 
passed the city, following the seven 
priests with trumpets of ram's horns 
and the ark of the Lord; and on the 
seventh day they compassed the city 
seven times. During these days 
there streams from the window of 
Rahab's house, upon the wall, the 
significant Scarlet Line. All Israel 
took affectionate notice of it, and 
the house upon which was this 
mark. Ezek. 9:4-6. While all the 
inhabitants of Jericho are in rest- 
less suspense, and their spirits faint 



34 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



within them in apprehension of 
their coming doom, in Rahab's 
house there is supporting hope, her 
house upon the wall is sanctified by 
the scarlet line, all within this house 
are in covenant safety, and shall be 
saved in that day. "By faith the 
harlot Rahab perished not with 
them that believed not." She looks 
forth upon the host of Israel, but 
she fears no evil of them, for her 
heart is toward them, and toward 
their God, and if at any time her 
heart wavered, and unbelief and 
fears intruded, there, to strengthen 
her hope, she sees that true token of 
the sworn friendship between her- 
self and Israel, the scarlet line 
bound in the window. One affec- 
tionate glance at this and her hope 
revives, and all is blissful peace. 
"Thou wilt keep him in perfect 
peace, whose mind is stayed on 
thee: because he trusteth in thee." 
At length the day of Jericho's doom 
is come. And it came to pass on 
the seventh day, that they rose early 
about the dawning of the day, and 
compassed the city after the same 
manner seven times. And it came 
to pass at the seventh time, when 
the priests blew with the trumpets, 
Joshua said unto the people, Shout: 
for the Lord hath given you the city. 
So the people shouted when the 
priests blew with the trumpets: and 
it came to pass, when the people 
heard the sound of the trumpet, and 
the people shouted with a great 
shout, that the wall fell down flat, 
so that the people went up into the 
city, every man straight before 
him, and they took the city. And 
they utterly destroyed all that was 
in the city, both man and woman, 
young and old, and ox, and sheep, 
and ass, with the edge of the sword. 
When the noise of the tumbling 



walls is hushed, and the dust of the 
ruins is fanned away, there, un- 
shaken upon the wall stands that 
house, that monument of God's sov- 
ereign grace, the sanctuary of the 
saved ones, the house of Rahab the 
harlot. 

"And in the window still bound fast, 
Above the fatal ram's horns blast, 
There streams the precious cove- 
nant sign, 
The token true, the scarlet line." 

"But Joshua had said unto the 
two men that had spied out the 
country, Go into the harlot's house, 
and bring out thence the woman 
and all that she hath, as ye swore 
unto her. And the young men that 
were spies went in, and brought out 
Rahab, and her father, and her 
mother, and her brethren, and all 
that she had; and they brought out 
all her kindred, and left them with- 
out the camp of Israel. And they 
burnt the city with fire, and all that 
was therein ; only the silver, and the 
gold, and the vessels of brass and 
of iron, they put into the treasury 
of the house of the Lord. And 
Joshua saved Rahab the harlot 
alive, and her father's household, 
and all that she had; and she dwell- 
eth in Israel even unto this day; be- 
cause she hid the messengers which 
Joshua sent to spy out Jericho." 

Thus Rahab came forth in sacred 
blessedness, with gratitude filling 
her heart, and then in due time she 
is adopted into the family of Israel, 
for she is united in marriage to Sal- 
mon, a prince of the house of 
Judah, by whom she gave birth to 
Boaz, who married Ruth, the Moa- 
bitess, who gave birth to Obed, and 
Obed begat Jesse, and Jesse begat 
David, of whom as concerning the 
flesh Christ came, who is over all 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



35 



God blessed forever, Amen. Matt. 
1:5. Ruth 4:21-22. 

The grace of our God is exceed- 
ing abundant, for it lifts the poor 
from the dust, and the beggar from 
the dunghill, to set them among 
princes, causing them to inherit the 
throne of glory. Our Savior hath 
washed his people from all their 
pollutions, in his own blood, and his 
church is without blame in his sight. 

Who shall lay anything to the 
charge of Rahab, the wife of Sal- 
mon, the prince of the house of 
Judah? Who shall lay anything 
to the charge of God's elect? It is 
God that justifieth; who is he that 
eondemneth? It is Christ that died, 
yea rather, that is risen again, who 
is even at the right hand of God, 
who also maketh intercession for 
us. 

May this, dear reader, be our 
consolation, and when we draw 
near our journey's end, and our exo- 
dus from the earthly house of this 
tabernacle is at hand; when the 
things of time, our dearest earthly 
friends, and all nature swoon away, 
recede and fade from our view 
around our dying bed, what then? 

Then, O thou gracious Redeemer, 
give me a true token, hold before 
mine eyes the scarlet line, enable 
me with eyes of faith and love to 
look upon thy precious atoning 
blood. O Lamb of God, smile up- 
on me; then with this true token a 
passport into heaven's glories shall 
be mine, and everlasting praises 
shall be thine. 

FREDERICK W. KEENE 
Raleigh, N. C. 



MANNER OF PREACHING. 

Pear Bro. Denny : 

I have recently read in the last 
Landmark an article written by 



Bro. Satterwhite that I consider so 
timely I would like to voice my ap- 
proval. The article I refer to is on 
"Manner of Preaching." 

I hope I believe Primitive Baptist 
doctrine, and have believed it for 
years. To me it is the best, — noth- 
ing to be compared with it, for it is 
the doctrine preached by Christ and 
his Apostles and since then handed 
down by revelation to faithful wit- 
nesses. 

As it is the doctrine of God our 
Savior it is high and holy, and 
should be handled (preached) in a 
way as becoming its author as it is 
possible for the Lord's servants to 
acquire. You will notice that I said 
acquire. I do not mean that one 
can learn by earthly wisdom to 
preach, for only the Lord can teach 
that, but I do mean that one can by 
carefulness learn to present the 
truth in a becoming way. If not, 
why did Paul command Timothy, 
his dearly beloved son in the gospel, 
to "Study to shew thyself approved 
unto God, a workman that needeth 
not to be ashamed, rightly dividing 
the word of truth." It seems to me 
that every word in the above quota- 
tion is full of meaning and worthy of 
our most careful consideration. 

One of the things we might learn 
from this is that there may be cir- 
cumstances or conditions in which 
God approves of things which is 
not apparent to man ; but Paul was 
commanding Timothy to act in such 
a way (in the pulpit and out of it, I 
understand) as to shew himself ap- 
proved unto God. We would 
think from the admonition follow- 
ing that there were some workmen 
that behaved in such a way that 
they needed to be ashamed. 

Brethren, have you not seen and 
heard some of our ministers in the 



36 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



stand, as well as out of it, that you 
felt ought to be ashamed? I will 
admit I have. The closing words 
of the quotation would seem to indi- 
cate that there is a dividing of the 
truth sometimes that might not be 
rightly done. 

When I hear one of our ministers 
take advantage of the pulpit to 
rail and denounce other denomina- 
tions, I do not feel it is "rightly di- 
viding the truth." Some expres- 
sions I have heard made I do not 
think would be commendable in 
any one outside the pulpit. If our 
belief is a revealed belief, can any 
one understand or believe it except 
it is revealed to that one? Then 
why rail on them, or censure or try 
to ridicule them for not believing as 
we do? I have noticed that such 
censure and ridicule usually re- 
bounds on the one using it, and not 
alone on that one, but on our people 
as a whole. Brethren these things 
ought not so to be. 

In the succeeding verse Paul 
tells Timothy "But shun profane 
and vain babblings." I would un- 
derstand the word profane here to 
mean worldly, secular, temporal. 
Webster defines babble, as "inarti- 
culate speech," "to talk incoherent- 
ly," "to utter unmeaning words," 
"to repeat, as words or phrases, in 
a childish way," "idle talk," "sense- 
less prattle," "to utter words indis- 
tinctly." Now Paul was command- 
ing Timothy to shun this. Do you 
not wish some of our ministers who 
are given to such would shun it too? 
We are told not to use "vain repeti- 
tions." Why should a minister fill 
a part of the time allotted to him in 
calling on "my Christian friends," 
and "my Fathers little children," 
and such habitual expressions over 
and over again during his dis- 



course? That is no preaching. The 
Lord's servants are commanded to 
"preach the word." Sometimes I 
have thought perhaps these useless 
and tiresome expressions were put 
in to fill up time. But why con- 
sume the time in such a way? I 
have heard you, Bro. Denny, and 
others preach a wonderfully rich 
and comforting sermon in a very 
few minutes. It is not the length 
of time a man stands, but what he 
says that comforts and edifies. 
When a speaker gets himself so 
wrought up in a whirlwind of unin- 
telligible words, with all sorts of 
frantic gestures that usually ac- 
company such speaking, is not that 
one kind of vain babbling? When 
a listener cannot understand what 
is being said, of what pleasure or 
comfort is the discourse? 

In 1 Cor. 14:9, Paul says "Except 
ye utter by the tongue words easy 
to understand, how shall it be 
known what is spoken? for ye shall 
speak into the air." In the 19th 
verse he says "I had rather speak 
five words with my understanding, 
that by my voice I might teach 
others also, than ten thousand 
words in an unknown tongue." 
Bro. Denny have you ever heard 
one get up and talk so fast, and so 
loud and so indistinctly, so unintel- 
ligibly, that it might as well have 
been in an unknown tongue? Where 
is the comfort in such speaking? In 
that same chapter the conclusion is 
"Let all things be done decently 
and in order." 

This gospel of ours if indeed I 
may claim to be one of those who 
have been taught to love it, is so 
high, so holy and so wonderful that 
it seems those of us who have been 
called as we hope to proclaim it, in 
a public way, should put forth our 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



37 



best efforts to declare it "decently 
and in order." For at our best we 
are imperfect and full of vanity. 

Let our dress also be neat and 
clean. Most of us are poor in this 
world's goods, but water is plenti- 
ful, usually, and soap is cheap. If 
there is need for us to economize, 
let us remember that clothes that 
are kept cleanly will last much long- 
er. It is no credit for our ministers 
or lay members either, to come to 
meeting with their clothes looking 
like they had been slept in while 
curing tobacco at a barn. 

I know that I am sinful, weak 
and vile and fall far short of my 
duty, and here I am presuming to 
criticize and advise others how to 
do. In what has been said, I have 
only meant to agree with Paul's 
writings, as I understand it. 

Just a few more words and I 
will close. Timothy was instructed 
to "Hold fast the form of sound 
words, which thou hast heard of 
me" (Paul). While a number, per- 
haps a majority of our ministers are 
unlearned in worldly schools, it has 
never seemed to me, a circumstance 
that needed to be boasted about in 
the pulpit, or anywhere else. Rather 
it should be the endeavor of such 
to learn to read and study the Bible, 
which is conceded by learned men 
to be the most beautiful language 
in the world, and which will fur- 
nish a vocabulary that is unexcelled. 

What has been written I hope 
has been written in love for the 
cause. If any or all of it is amiss 
I beg you to forgive. 



Dear Mr. Gold: 

The foregoing is an anonymous 
letter. I think it must have been 
an oversight on the part of the 
writer. The envelope was post- 



marked Durham, N. C, but neither 
name nor address is mentioned. If 
published we will be glad to have 
the author claim it so as to give the 
writer the credit. 

Very truly, 

O. J. DENNY, 
Editor. 



ENJOYED THE SERMON 

LaFayette, Ala. 

Eld. J. T. Rowe, 

Baltimore, Md. 
Dear servant of the most high God, 
who shows unto us the way of sal- 
vation : 

Since I read your experience in 
Landmark I feel impressed to write 
you. Of course we are strangers 
to each other in the flesh, but as I 
can so heartily receive what you 
write in Landmark, I don't feel that 
I am addressing a stranger in the 
spirit. 

This morning I read the sermon 
you preached on Oct. 12, 1929, on 
the subject of faith, and no human 
tongue can tell how glad this poor 
sinner would have been to have 
heard it. But since I could not 
hear it I am glad to read it, which 
comes next to hearing. Yesterday 
I looked in Eld. Pittman's book of 
ministers and I find you were or- 
dained to the ministry the same year 
as myself, 1882. 

Yesterday I happened to look 
over some Gospel Messengers, and 
noticed the account, or obituary no- 
tice you gave of the death of your 
second wife in January, 1920, and 
while it made me sad still I am sure 
the Lord gave you a third. 

In Eld. Pittman's book you are 
made to appear very youthful, but I 
know by this time you look quite 
different. 

I have been married 52 years, or 



38 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



will be the 14th of this month, and 
my wife has been afflicted all the 
time, and is today almost helpless, 
and now she and I live alone, and 
you may say, "Thank God for his 
mercy to a poor sinner." 

This has been a thorn in the 
flesh, a messenger of satan to buffet 
me, and though now past 70 herself, 
she is full of energy, and keeps our 
home straight and nice, and her 
room is full (so to speak) of fall 
flowers sent in, many of them, by 
neighbors and friends. 

In looking over old Gospel Mes- 
sengers today I notice what Elder 
Hassell said of me in 1919, Oct., on 
page 227. I had forgotten whot he 
said, but he being dead yet speaks,, 
and I needed that little bit. Just 
at this time, and it is strong drink 
to him who is ready to perish. 

Mr. J. W. Jones of Peaehland 
sent me one of the minutes of the 
Bear Creek Association and I al- 
most wept to be at such an assem- 
bly of saints. 

My dear brother, pray for me; 
and if you can think of one of the 
most dependent creatures in all of 
your acquaintance, ask that one to 
pray for me. 

Yours in love, 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



Dear Mr. Gold: 

This letter is quite a comfort to 
me, and seems to prove that your 
mind to take and publish it did also 
work to the comfort of at least one 
child of God. 

J. T. Rowe. 



EXPERIENCE. 

I have had an impression many 
times since I joined the church to 
write what I hope and feel that the 
Lord has done for my weary soul. I 



would put it off and I would ret 
dull and dreary. 

I have a mind now to write a few 
lines and hope the Lord will be with 
me and guide me with those feel- 
ings. 

I had serious thoughts about dy- 
ing when I was quite young and 
did not realize my sins until I was 
about twenty three years old, then 
a trouble came on me. I would 
study day and night wondering 
what was the matter with me. It 
came to me it was sin. Then I be- 
came so troubled I thought I never 
could stand the trouble I was in. It 
seemed like everything I ever did 
wrong was before me. I went on 
that way trying to pray. It seemed 
it did no good. Then it came to 
me that I did not know how to pray. 
I began trying to ask the lord to 
teach me how to pray. I felt like 
I could not do anything without his 
help. I was so troubled I could 
hardly do my work nor sleep at 
night. I would lie late hours at 
night with tears falling from my 
eyes begging the lord to have mercy 
on me a miserable creature. Some 
times I would go to the table to eat. 
I would get so filled with tears in 
my eyes I could not eat. I felt 
like I was not worthy of what was 
before me. I was in that condition 
for a long time. I felt like I could 
not live that way, my burden was 
so great. One morning I gave up. 
If I stayed that way I could not do 
any more work. I would sit down 
by my baby in the cradle. I could 
not stay there. I walked away 
from the house, laid my head on 
the fence asking the Lord to have 
mercy on me. I could not stay 
there. I would go back to the 
house. I went the third time. I 
bowed my head on the fence asking 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



39 



fo 1 * mercy. I realized there was a 
change. It looked like everything 
on earth was praying to God. It 
looked like the birds and chickens 
sang so sweet, and the trees and 
grass were praying to God. I had 
a sad feeling. Some time after that 
day I began thinking about joining 
the church. I would go to preach- 
ing every chance I had, especially 
to Wheeler's church. I would sit 
and look at the good people and 
wish I was fit to live with them. I 
thought they were the best people I 
ever saw. I wanted to be with 
them. I felt like they would not 
want me with them. I thought 
they knew I was nothing but a sin- 
ner. 

T wanted to join the Primitive 
Baptists. I went to Wheeler's to 
hear a traveling preacher. It 
seemed like his preaching was to 
me. I felt like I could not leave 
and not offer to the church. I was 
received and baptized the next 
meeting. That was in 1893. 

I have just written a few sketch- 
es of my troubles. I don't feel like 
I can ever tell it all. 

Mrs. W. J. Whitfield, 
Prospect Hill, N. C. 



THE RICHES OF HIS GRACE 

Oh, that I could write of the rich- 
es of His grace and the power of 
his love. The dear old church has 
been before me this morning with 
all of its troubles, and my mind 
went back to the time I first joined. 
How different I see it now. It was 
all love, peace and joy then; now 
it seems the reverse. I looked for- 
ward to the meeting days as I did 
Christmas, when I was a child. 
When all the family came together 
with our nearest friends, with noth- 
ing to do but eat and drink the 



good things that were prepared for 
us. But how different it was when 
I learned that there was no real 
Santa Claus. What brought this 
change? Was it something I had 
done or something I had discover- 
ed? Ah, that I may glory in my 
infirmities and may the power of 
Christ rest upon me. 

Mr. Gold, I wish you would write 
more often for these pages. Your 
T etter to Elder Hardy a few years 
ago furnished much food for 
thought. 

Please find enclosed check for 
four dollars ($4.00) to pay for the 
Landmark. 

Mrs. D. Womble, 

Route 4, Box 66 
Nashville, N. C. 



PEACE AND FELLOWSHIP. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

I feel like writing a letter to the 
Landmark. If you think it worth 
the space you may print it. 

It is so sad to me to hear of so 
much trouble in the Baptist 
Churches. I feel like it would be a 
good idea to have a day set apart 
for fasting and prayer, begging for 
peace and fellowship with each 
other; to humble down to the Lord 
and beg him for what we want and 
feel we need. 

I am seventy-two years old and 
have been a member at Cross 
Roads Church for 50 years. When 
I first joined they had fasting and 
prayer days for rain. The Lord sent 
it and I believe he will answer our 
prayers. He is so good and merci- 
ful to us. It will be no harm to beg 
him for peace among the brethren. 

1 hope some of the brethren will 
think this over and write what they 



40 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



think about this as I am a poor 
writer. But I do want to know 
that we have peace and fellowship 
in all the churches. 

Your friend, 
M. M. Curry, 

Stokes, N. C. 



BOOK FOR SALE. 

Dear Editors of Zion's Landmark: 

Will you please inform your 
brethren and many readers through 
the columns of the dear old Zion's 
Landmark that I have several re- 
maining copies of The Life and Ex- 
periences of my father, the late El- 
der Lewis Edwards. The book was 
published by me along with some of 
my doctrinal views, covering about 
thirty pages. Both writings are 
bound in one book. The books 
have been selling at thirty five 
cents per copy, but I will sell the 
balance at twenty five cents. 

I have one file letters from able 
Primitive Baptist Elders from dif- 
ferent sections of the country that 
are sound in the faith and who 
speak well of this book. 

Any one interested in a copy of 
this book can obtain one on receipt 
of price in stamps or cash. 

W. L. Edwards, 
Route 3, Castlewood, Va. 



ONE OF THE FAMILY. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I write in regard to my subscrip- 
tion, knowing that my time has ex- 
pired. I am sorry I have let it go 
by this long, so if you will bear with 
me I will take the time to send you 
a money order for $4.00 that will 
pay for 1929 and 1930. I don't 
think I can get along without it, for 
I feel just like something has hap- 
pened when it does not come. I 



miss the dear old Landmark a« one 

of the family. 

I just can't feel at home when the 
dear old Landmark hasn't come in. 
I can read the good experience* 
and feel so new in my experience. I 
think the good Lord has sent Hia 
spirit through the dear old paper 
so that we can commune together 
in that way. 

Mrs. Stephen Howell 
Saulston, N. C, R. 1. 



WHAT DO YOU THINK OF IT? 

Elder O. J. Denny, 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Dear Bro. Denny: 

No doubt you saw in the Land- 
mark about the "Home of the Bap- 
tists" for our people. We would be 
glad to learn the minds of the peo- 
ple. Let each clerk of his church 
put the matter before his ehurch so 
that we could learn what the people 
wanted. We do not wish to put 
anything before the people unserip- 
turally if we know it. 

We are now making this special 
appeal and we want to know what 
the churches think about it. 

Your brother in hope, 

W. M. MONSEES, 

Ayden, N. C. 



ENJOYS THE LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 

Wilson, North Carolina. 
Dear Editor: 

Enclosed you find money order 
for $2.00 to renew my subscription 
to Zion's Landmark. I enjoy read- 
ing the good things printed in thia 
paper and do not want to miss an 
issue. 

May God's richest blessings bt 
with you all. 

Mrs. E. P. Waddell, 

Kenly, N. C. 



inn lakmujk 



41 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Klder 0. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
ifilder M. L. Gilbert —Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIII. '. No. 3 

Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSON, N. C, DEC. 15, 1929 



CHRISTMAS GREETINGS. 

We are nearing the close of an- 
other year and wish to thank the 
readers of the Landmark for their 
patience, support and even for their 
criticisms. We extend to all our 
best wishes for a happy Christmas 
season and a New Year well filled 
with the blessings of the Lord. 

In the passing of our late Elder 
and Editor Posey G. Lester, the 
Landmark family sustained a dis- 
tinct loss. Since his passing, we 
have tried to carry on; but with a 
feeling of unworthiness and with a 
consciousness of our dependence 
upon the Lord for any degree of suc- 
cess that we might attain. 

We have not desired leadership. 
We do desire the spiritual presence 
and praise of the Lord, that we may 
be directed aright. 

Many have been kind enough to 
write us, and some to speak words 
of encouragement during the year. 
We thank each one. We need 
'flowers, while we live. 



Some have criticised our policy 
and some have written to know if 
we endorsed all that has appeared 
in the Landmark columns. We 
thank them, especially, for it gives 
us an opportunity to say, in reply to 
all who may have inquired, that Mr. 
Gold, the owner and publisher of 
Zion's Landmark, and myself are 
fully agreed on this one point, to 
wit: We do not always fully under- 
stand, perhaps, the meaning of a 
writer, nor do we fully agree with 
all that may be said; but we hope 
to be charitable enough to let our 
brethren express themselves in their 
own language and do not feel that 
we should expect or require every 
one to see through our glasses, or to 
fully grasp our own meaning, in all 
that we may say. 

It is said of old, "Come let us rea- 
son together." Are we not taught in 
the scriptures and by our experi- 
ence, that "In me, that is in my 
flesh, there dwells no good thing." 
Again we read, "All your righteous- 
ness is of me saith the Lord." We 
can but say Amen. 

As we approach the coming of an- 
other year, may we not ask our 
readers, to tell others if you enjoy 
the Landmark and want to see it 
live and be a useful ' family paper 
among us. If you have any con- 
structive criticism to make, tell us. 
Write for the paper, if you feel to 
do so. 

Peter said, "Add to your faith 
VIRTUE, and to virtue KNOWL- 
EDGE; and to knowledge TEM- 
PERANCE, and to temperance PA- 
TIENCE, and to patience, GODLI- 
NESS, and to godliness BROTHER- 
LY KINDNESS, and to brotherly 
kindness CHARITY." 

VIRTUE, KNOWLEDGE, TEM- 
PERANCE, PATIENCE, GODLI- 



42 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



NESS, BROTHERLY KINDNESS 
and CHARITY are all graces of our 
God, fruits of His spirit. We close 
our writings for the year 1929, by 
saying with Paul, "The grace of our 
Lord Jesus Christ be with your 
spirit. Amen. 

O. J. DENNY. 



"MANY ARE CALLED, BUT FEW 
ARE CHOSEN." 
Matt. 20:16; 22:14. 

Not long ago ,a brother, whose 
name I cannot recall, requested 
that I give my opinion of the above 
scripture through Zion's Landmark. 
I know it is much easier to quote a 
scripture than it is to correctly 
elucidate its true meaning. The 
above quotation appears just at the 
close of two parables of our Lord: 
the first shows the householder's 
manner of reckoning with the la- 
borers in his vineyard ; and the 
spirit manifested by some of them. 
In the second parable, may be seen 
a peculiar, though not an uncom- 
mon, spirit manifested by one of the 
guests, who had been invited and 
had eaten of the supper prepared 
for the king's son and his guests. 

All scripture given by inspiration 
is profitable for reproof, correction 
and instruction in righteousness to 
the man of God. The meaning of 
the words as used in the quotation 
of our querist do not seem to oc- 
cur elsewhere in the Bible. In the 
nineteenth chapter a young man 
said to the Master, "Good Master, 
what good thing shall I do, that I 
may have eternal life." Jesus, know- 
ing that his trust was in the law, 
called his attention to that which 
the law required. He assured the 
Master that he had kept those from 
his youth; and, feeling that he had 
done all that was needful, he may 



have thought he would bring Jesus 
to his wits end by asking, "What 
lack I yet?" The Master replied 
"If thou will be perfect, go and sell 
that thou hast, and give to the poor, 
and thou shalt have treasure in 
heaven; and come and follow me." 
As the young man's heart was in 
his riches, he went away sorrowful. 
The apostles were amazed at the 
Lord's answer, and asked Him, 
"Who then can be saved?" For by 
his teaching he had brought, as it 
were, the Old Testament language 
into the New Testament meaning. 
So Jesus answered them : "With 
men this is impossible; but with 
God all things are possible." 

"For the kingdom of heaven is 
like unto a man that is an house- 
holder, which went out early in the 
morning to hire labourers into his 
vineyard." Note, the present tense 
is used. It refers not to any one in 
the law dispensation, nor to the 
eternal doom of the sinner; and, 
neither to the acts of a nominal pro- 
fessor? The words, "called" and 
"chosen" have no allusion to God's 
choosing his people in Christ before 
the world, or of His calling them to 
a knowledge of salvation with a 
holy calling. Neither does it seem 
to mean, as some think, that one 
class of laborers and guests, were 
called and chosen by gospel preach- 
ing to ineffectual blessings, if it 
were possible for the gospel so to 
do. "For the kingdom of heaven." 
The word "for" shows a connection 
with the precious chapter, and was 
broached in the lesson of this par- 
able to teach Peter and all that 
would manifest a spirit like him in 
any age. Note his reply and ques- 
tion to Jesus: "Behold, we have for- 
saken all and followed thee: what 
shall we have therefore?" This 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



43 



parable was meant to teach Peter, 
and his church for all time that gos- 
pel blessings are not attained by 
creature works, obedience or merit. 
Yet, I am sure there lurks, at times 
within God's children, a spirit of 
expectant reward for that they have 
or may do. Who is there that has 
not sometimes harbored the thought 
that if I will do certain things God 
will bless me? Few there be, if any, 
that are entirely free from a legal 
spirit. 

Now, this man, who is a house- 
holder, went out early in the morn- 
ing to hire laborers into his vine- 
yard,, and put them to work agree- 
ing to give each a penny a day. 
Three hours later, about nine 
o'clock, he found others at the 
market place idle, and sending 
them into the vineyard, he said, 
"Whatsoever is right, 1 will give 
you." At noon, also in the middle 
of the afternoon, he did likewise. 
Then at the eleventh hour he found 
others idle, and saith to them, "Why 
stand ye here all day idle? They 
say, because no man hath hired us. 
He saith unto them, "Go ye also into 
the vineyard ; and whatsoever is 
right, that shall ye receive." As 
different kinds of work is to be done 
in the vineyard ; and it is doubtless 
a figure of the kingdom or church. 
Where much is given, much is re- 
quired. The blessings and privi- 
leges are common to each laborer; 
and while one may have been in it 
longer and labored more, each re- 
ceives whatever is right — each a 
penny. Grace gifts are not bestow- 
ed of merit. Paul says, "I labored 
more abundantly than they all 
(meaning other apostles) ; yet not 
I, but the grace of God which was 
with me." 

At the close of the day — twelfth 



hour, the lord of the vineyard in- 
structs the steward to call in the lab- 
orers and give them their hire, 
reckoning from the last to the first, 
without regard to time or work, 
each laborer received a penny. If 
those who had agreed to work all 
the day for a penny had received 
their wages first, they doubtless 
would have gone away satisfied; 
but seeing others who had scarcely 
laboured one-twelfth as much as 
they had get a penny, the old na- 
ture was stirred to murmuring, for- 
getting if it had not been for the 
man that hired them, that they 
would have been penniless. Hear 
Paul along this line : "Henceforth 
there is laid up for me a crown of 
righteousness, which the Lord, the 
righteous judge, shall give me at 
that day: and not to me only, but 
unto all them" — whether they have 
done little or much — "also that love 
his appearing." 

The man lets these of a selfish 
spirit know, by saying to one o* 
them, "Friend, I do thee no wrong: 
didst not thou agree with me for a 
penny? Is it not lawful for me to 
do what I will with mine own? 
Many be called, but few chosen." 
This is the accommodation and ap- 
plication of the parable of the la- 
borers of their lord ; that it was not 
a good spirit to think their service 
thankworthy. Christ said, "When 
ye shall have done all those things 
which are comanded you, say, We 
are unprofitable servants: We 
have done that which was our duty 
to do." 

Now a word more respecting the 
man who was invited and partook 
of the feast at the marriage supper. 
He did dishonor to the king by act- 
ing unworthily of the vocation 
wherewith he was called. The 



44 



XION'S LANDMARK 



wedding garment is not the right- 
eousness of Christ; for that he had 
before he partook of the feast. He 
did not do like the "bridegroom 
decketh himself with ornaments, 
and as the bird adorneth herself 
with jewels." To have donned the 
wedding garment would have been 
to have walked according to the 
principles of grace and holiness. 
For the king to come in to behold 
the guests was to show special favor 
and not to judge them. But when 
he saw him who had not honored 
the son and reproached the cause; 
he said to him, "Friend, how 
earnest thou in hither, not having a 
wedding garment?" His sin had 
found him out. He could not an- 
swer; but weeping and gnashing of 
teeth followed in the darkness of 
his , experience. The dead in sins 
or a mere nominal professor, would 
not have had such soul sorrow. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



SALVATION. 

For the grace of God that bring- 
eth Salvation hath appeared to all 
men. Teaching us that denying 
ungodliness and worldly lust, we 
should live soberly, righteously, and 
godly in this present world. — Titus 
2:11, 12. 

We notice in the foregoing verses 
that Paul is instructing Titus con- 
cerning the manner in which he 
should preach. He should speak 
the things that become sound doc- 
trine — it is of course needful to 
preach doctrine, which is Bible 
doctrine, but they who hold and 
preach sound doctrine are to be 
taught to live in that way that is 
becoming the doctrine they profess 
to believe in the Church of Jesus 
Christ, three are old men and old 
women, young men and young wo- 



men and servants, as well as preach- 
ers and Paul gives Titus a lesson for 
all of these as well as for himself, 
and all to the end that the doctrine 
of God, our Saviour may be adorn- 
ed in all things. The aged men are 
to be sober, (or as it reads in the 
margin vigilant, watchful) grave, 
temperate, sound in faith, in charity, 
in patience, showing earnestness 
and love with long suffering. The 
aged women are to be in behavior 
as becometh holiness, teachers of 
good things, not false accusers, not 
given to much wine. This certain- 
ly teaches that both the aged men 
and the aged women are to show 
their faith by their works. Show 
me thy faith without thy works, 
and I will show you my faith by my 
works. — James. The aged women 
are to teach the young women to 
be sober, (in the margin it reads 
wise) to love their husbands and 
children, to be discreet, chaste, 
keepers at home, good, obedient to 
their own husbands, that the word 
of God be not blasphemed. How 
lightly is the religion of those who 
fail to live according to their pro- 
fession spoken of. Do not those who 
in their hearts love the doctrine of 
God our Saviour, desire to honor 
and glorify Him, in their bodies and 
in their spirits which are His? 

We notice that the aged men, the 
young women and the young men 
are exhorted to be sober. This 
word sober as applied to the old 
men in the margin is vigilant, which 
means that they should be watchful 
against evil, and watchful for good. 
If they do this they are an inspira- 
tion and a fit example to the young, 
the same word sober in the case of 
the young women, in the margin is 
vwise, and this means that they 
should be taught by the aged worn- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



45 



en to have a clear and correct dis- 
cernment of what is conducive to 
the highest interest of the church, 
and of the profession they have 
made of the religion of the Lord 
Jesus Christ. Young men are to be 
exhorted to be sober minded, in the 
margin it reads, discreet, which 
means avoiding errors. Selecting 
the best means to accomplish a pur- 
pose having good discernment, the 
aged women are to be in behavior 
as becometh holiness or holy wom- 
en, not false accusers. Which in 
the margin reads makehates and 
means one who excites quarrels 
and contentions. Then Titus, the 
preacher of sound doctrine and the 
speaker of the things that become 
sound doctrine is in all things to 
show himself a pattern of good 
works, in doctrine shewing uncor- 
ruptness, gravity, sincerity and to 
do this with sound speech that can- 
not be condemned in such manner 
as the Holy Ghost has dictated to 
prophets and apostles. In doing 
this he that is of the contrary part 
is made ashamed of having no evil 
thing to say of him that thus con- 
ducts himself. 

Now, exhort servants to be obed- 
ient to their masters, to please them 
well in all things, without gainsay- 
ing, but showing good fidelity: that 
they may adorn the doctrine of God 
our Saviour in all things. A church 
made up of aged men, and aged 
women, young men and young wom- 
en, servants and masters, with one 
going in and out before them sound 
in doctrine and prudent in practice, 
rach walking worthy of the voca- 
tion wherewith they are called, is 
a beautiful sight indeed. She is a 
woman clothed with the Sun, 
(Christ) and the moon (the Law), 
wrnhr her feet and upon her head 



a crown of twelve stars, that is hav- 
ing apostolic approval for her doc- 
trine and practice, the old and the 
young, the free and the bound, all 
talking and walking to the glory of 
God, are a help one to another. 
And these are the all men referred 
to in verse eleven, that is all classes 
and conditions of men, and not to 
every individual of Adam's fallen 
race. If this was what the apostle 
meant we should see some evidence 
of it, but we do not. But we do 
see the old and the young, servants 
and masters, as well as male and 
female coming to Christ and mani- 
festing the fact that the grace of 
God that bringeth salvation hath 
appeared unto them. Remember 
that it is the grace of God that 
bringeth salvation, (not that offer- 
eth Salvation) . But the grace of 
God brings Salvation to all the ob- 
jects of his love. For the Son of 
man is come to seek and to save 
that which was lost. Notice it is 
Jesus that seeks, and as sure as he 
seeks he saves. "He shall not fail, 
nor be discouraged, till he have set 
judgment in the earth and the isles 
shall wait for his law." — Isaiah 
42:4. 

This is written at the request of 
Brother R. A. Bailey, Robersonville 
N. C. May the Lord give him and 
all others who may read this a deep- 
er understanding of the subject 
than I have been able to express. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



MRS. MARY JANE SHIVLEY VEST. 

Mrs. Mary Jane Shivley Vest was born 
January 28, 1848, died January 15, 1929 
of flu and heart trouble, (age 70 years, 11 
months and 17 days.) She was married 
to Mr. James E. Vest soon after the Civil 
War. To thi» umion were borji 7 children. 
Those surviving ara, Masdame* Julia A. 
Howell. Sallie E. Hudson, Messrs. James 
M. and Arthur Vest, of Floyd, Va., Mrs. 
Vergie R. Kellev, Messrs. John J. and Geo. 
W. Vest, of Roarioke, Va., 2 2 gfarideltll- 



46 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



dren, 29 great grandchildren and a host 
of other relatives and friends. 

Her husband preceded her to the grave 
several years ago. Also the eldest hoy 
died while young. 

Sister Vest united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church near thirty years ago. She 
was held in high esteem by her acquaint- 
ances, being of an unusually kind and 
lovely disposition. 

I have often wished I could be humble 
like she was and could meet disappoint- 
ments like she seemed to meet them. 

She will be greatly missed by her 
church. She was a faithful member. 

I feel my inability to find words to ex- 
press how well thought of Sister Vest was. 
Oh! that we might praise God for mem- 
bers like she was. Paul said, "By the 
Grace of God, I am what I am." 

She died easily, seeming to wear a smile. 

No funeral was held on account of sick- 
ness. She was laid to rest in the Vest 
cemetery to await the blessed call of Him 
who shall awake the dead. 

MRS. B. O. THOMPSON. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

To the Family of Sister Frances Allen, 
from the Church at Hannah's Creek. 

Whereas the God of all grace saw fit to 
visit our little flock and called from us our 
dear sister Frances Allen. She was born 
Feb. 14, 1856 and died Dec. the 14, 1926 
making her stay on earth seventy years 
and four months. Sister Frances Allen 
was married to John G. Allen and to this 
union were born nine children, two preced- 
ing her to the grave several years ago. 

The third Saturday in July 190 7 Sister 
Frances Allen united with the church at 
Hannah's Creek, living a faithful member 
until her death. 

First, the church at Hannah's Creek has 
lost a dear and faithful member, but we 
desire to bow in humble submission to him 
who doeth all things well. 

Second, that we extend to the family 
our heartfelt sympathy in this sad hour of 
bereavement, hoping He who doeth all 
things well may give them grace to be 
submissive to His will. 

Third, that a copy of the resolutions be 
placed on our church book, and a copy be 
sent to the family and one to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication. 

Done by order of conference at Han- 
nah's Creek, January 19, 1929. 

ELDER XURE LEE, Moderator. 
BRO. C. A. JOHNSON, Clerk. 
BRO. L. G. ALLEN, 
BRO. T. E. JOHNSON, 
BRO. C. H. WOODALL, 

Committee. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas it has pleased Almighty God to 
remove by death from our church at Han- 
nah's Creek our dearly beloved brother, 
James Henry Allen. 

Brother Allen was born Feb. 8th., 1866 
and died Jan. 2nd, 1929, making his stay 



on faith 62 years, 10 months, and 24 days. 
He was married May 16th., 1888 to Lucy 
Hawkins Johnson and to this union 7 
children were born, of whom 6 are living. 

On the third Sunday in October 1891, 
he united with the church at Hannah's 
Creek, living a faithful member until his 
death of about 37 years. 

1st. We, the church at Hannah's Creek 
extend our deepest sympathy to the entire 
family in their great loss, hoping they 
may look unto him, in whom he trusted 
and worshipped. 

2nd. The church at Hannah's Creek 
has lost a faithful member, always filling 
his seat unless greatly hindered. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the family, one to our church 
record, and one to Zion's Landmark for 
publication. 

Done by order of conference at Han- 
nah's Creek church Saturday before the 
3rd Sunday in January, 19 29. 

ELDER XURE LEE, Moderator 
CHARLIE JOHNSON, Clerk 
D. G. ALLEN, 
T. E. JOHNSON, 

Committee. 



ELLEN ANN HARRIS FARROW. 

The people of God never die but fall 
asleep in the arms of Jesus. Yes, rest 
from all their labors and their works do 
follow them. 

Such is the case of this dear child of 
God, for indeed she was one not in the 
name only but in deed and in truth. She 
exemplified Christ's life by her own, it 
could be truly said of her. She showed 
her faith in her works; did not put her 
light under the bushel but put it where all 
might see and take knowledge that she had 
been with the Lord. 

s;:e w.is born September 24, 1857, was 
married February 14, 1877 and died April 
17, 1929. 

She united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church several years ago, was baptized by 
her pastor, Elder E. E. Lundy. Indeed 
she lived worthy of the vocation wherein 
she had been called. With all meekness, 
and humbleness of spirit she was ever bow- 
ing at the feet of her brethren, esteeming 
them better than herself. Adorning her 
profession with all Godliness of a meek, 
quiet spirit she learned obedience by the 
things that she suffered. Being one of 
that number that had been called of God 
to be faithful she had to suffer. She was 
a model, a pattern of worthy emulation, 
for she was indeed plain and modest in 
manner and appearance, making no show 
in the flesh. Pride she did condemn. She 
was strong, well established in the doc- 
trine, had a far reaching, deep spiritual 
mentality. She .was a wonderful woman. 
One that is sadly missed. She was found 
dead in bed. How sweet is the sleep of 
Hi" righteous. 

She leaves to mourn their loss, husband. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



47 



W. M. Farrow; two daughters, Mrs. Efron 
Williams and Mrs. Warren Williams; 
three grandchildren, two brothers and a 
host of relatives and friends. We should 
not mourn as those without hope, for I 
fe°l our loss is her eternal gain. I would 
say to her husband, "Weep not, for only 
a few more short years and you, too, will 
be with her on the banks of sweet deliver- 
ance, where there will be no goodbyes," 
and to her children I would say "Emulate 
her life and when you come to the parting 
of the ways you, too, will be ushered in to 
join her where yon will shed no more 
parting tears, and where you will never 
part again." 

I loved her, Oh I loved her, 
But God loved her best. 
So he rame and took her to reign 
With him forever blest. 

Written by her sorrowing niece, 

Effie H. Carrawan, 
Swan Quarter, N. C. 



SARAH JARVIS BERRY 

I would that I knew how to speak of 
such blessed saints; of their lives and 
their righteous dying but I can only hint. 
Yet I know it is not needful to write much 
for I can never tell the half, yet a few 
words fitly spoken are as apples of gold in 
pictures of silver. 

It was only those that knew her best 
that loved her most, for she was one whom 
the more you were brought in touch with 
the more you appreciated her unselfish 
life, that seemed to be sealed up, yet full 
of humble contrition. She felt to be the 
least, the poorest and weakest of all the 
flock, but was the strongest in faith and 
was goodness itself. She could not be any- 
thing else. 

I have often thought that was why she 
had to suffer so much; she was so much 
like Christ. She lived His life as near as 
human could. She had all the patience 
that could be had. She never murmured. 
She felt that it was for her meanness she 
had to suffer, but it was not so. It was 
her faith. Oh, the sorrow she had to pass 
through. She was left a widow with an 
only child, a boy. She was a cripple for 
years, having fallen three different times. 

She united with the Primitive Baptist 
church many years ago, living the true 
faith, dying the same. She died over a 
vcar ago, being more than 74 years old. 
She was faithful to her trust. 

Her son was indeed faithful. He did 
all for her he could. His loss is all that 
he has to mourn. What a blessing. How 
she is blessed, forever blessed. 

She leaves her son, daughter-in-law, one 
brother and many relatives and friends to 
mourn their loss which is great. Yet the 
Lord can soothe their sorrows, and He will 
be their stay, so, trust in the Lord and He 
will take you to your dear darling mother 



and sister, where no partings ever come 
and where those long parted meet again. 

The voice we loved so well is still, 
And the chair in her home is vacant and 
can't be filled. 
Written by one who loved her. 

Effie H. Carrawan, 
Swan Quarter, N. C. 



MRS. MAMIE GRAY 

It is with much sorrow that I write the 
death of my husband's sister, Mrs. Mamie 
Gray, wife of Mr. H. G. Gray, daughter of 
Mr. F. S. Smith and Fannie L. Smith. Our 
sister, Mrs. Mamie Gray was born July 17, 
1890 and died December 31, 1928. She 
was married April 17, 1907. To this union 
were born six children, four girls and two 
boys, one boy being dead. She was the 
oldest sister of eight brothers, one sister 
and a half sister. Her sister and one bro- 
ther, father and mother are dead. They 
were all believers in the Primitive Baptist 
Church, but not members. But I feel sure 
my sister had intended joining the Baptist 
church if ever she joined any, for she and 
I had often talked on that subject. She 
was a tender, loving mother, a dutiful 
wife and good neighbor. She was good 
and kind to all and always ready to lend a 
helping hand to all in need. The night 
she was taken with a chill, one week be- 
fore she died, she had gone to stay by the 
bedside of a dying baby. And I feel to 
know her was to love her. She was always 
so ready to meet her troubles with a smile 
ways tried to see the bright side, for her- 
and help others smile over theirs. She al- 
se'.f and for others. I feel like she is at 
rest. And I feel God blessed her, for she 
left her family well cared for. Her oldest 
girl or girls can keep house for their 
father and small sisters and brother, for 
she had trained her children to be very 
obedient and helpful. I was with her 
in her death sickness and on Sunday be- 
fore she died Monday she seemed better. 
Some of her brothers, all her children, and 
some friends were with her. She seemed 
to enjoy them and the day of her death 
she was very sick but had her mind. I 
was by her bed all the afternoon, and she 
wanted to go to sleep and rest, so late in 
the afternoon she went to sleep and dur- 
ing her sleep as we thought, she died. She 
had a smile on her face, and looked as if 
she was asleep, and at rest. But it was a 
great trouble to us all to give her up, and 
sometimes I feel it can't be so. But "God 
knows best," and her good work on earth 
is over and I feel she is at rest. The fun- 
eral service was held at her home and at 
the grave by Rev. W. W. Roberts, and 
with many friends and relatives present 
she was laid to rest in the cemetery at 
Newport, N. C, in the family burying lot. 

A few lines in honor of our sister: 



48 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Dearest sister thou art sleeping, 
Sad and lonely we are weeping, 
Far from us yo uare gone, 
But we hope to meet you 
On the resurrection morn. 

Dearest sister, you have left us 

And we are left to mourn 

But why should we weep or mourn 

If your face I see no more 

I only hope to meet you 

On the other shore. 

All your earthly troubles are over 
And you may sleep and rest 
For God thought it best 
With the angels thou art praising 
The eternal king above. 

When our days on earth are over 
And from grief and pain be free 
We hope in heaven Ave will meet you 

And join in praise with thee. 
Written by her sister, 

MRS. LIZZIE SMITH, 
Newport, N. C. 



MRS. NELLIE WOODARD. 

In memory of my dear mother who de- 
parted this life April 18, 1928. She ^nas 
a great sufferer for about four week?. She 
was taken to the Goldsbo/o Hospital but 
nothing they did seemed to do her any 
good. She seemed to be reconciled to the 
Lord's will. When we all would go to oee 
her she would greet us with a smile. We 
miss her so much. She would always 
come when any of us were sick. She en- 
joyed going with me off to preaching. She 
enjoyed going to union meetings so much 
and was a faithful member in her church 
and will be greatly missed for she enjoyed 
having the brothers and sisters visit her. 

She was received at Bethany church, 
at Pine Level, June 28, 1908, and was a 
faithful member utnil death. She leaves 
one brother and 6 children to mourn their 
loss, but feel sure our loss is her eternal 
gain. The funeral was held at the church 
in which she was a member, by Elder J. W. 
Gardner. Her body was laid to rest in the 
family burying ground. 

Written by her son, 

W. H. WOODARD. 



JAMES H. BRADY 

It is with a sad heart that I am asking 
you to stop sending the Landmark to Jas. 
H. Brady, Smithfield, N. C, as the death 
angel visited his home the 2nd day of last 
October and took him from our midst. O 
how we miss our brother. He was so 
good and kind to all, but the goad Le*gl 
giveth aad He takeWi away. Oh tfc'at We 
could ba aubmissira ta his will. 

Yours in hope «f eternal life. 

MRB. A. J. WHITLEY 

Smithfield, N. «. 



THE CONTENTNEA UNION. 

The next session of the Contentnea 
Union was appointed to be held with the 
church at Uper Town Creek Wilson Coun- 
ty, N. C, the fifth Saturday and Sunday 
in December, 1929. 

Elder W. B. Kearney was chosen to 
preach the introductory sermon and Elder 
J. E. Mewborn as alternate. The church 
is situated about five miles east of Elm 
City. 

A special Invitation is extended our min- 
istering brethren. 

J. E. MEWBORN, Union Clerk. 



LINVILLE UNION 

The next session of the Linville Union is 
appointed to be held with the church at 
Toms Creek, Davidson County, N. C, on 
Saturday and fifth Sunday in December, 
19 29. This church is located near Den- 
ton, N. C. 

An invitation is extended to brethren, 
;<isters and friends, and a special invita- 
tion to ministers. 

W. L. TEAGUE. 



APPOINTMENTS FOR ELDER 
D. G, STAPLES. 

Please publish in the next issue of the 
Landmark the following appointments for 
Eld. D. G. Staples, Brown Summit, N. C: 

Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 28th., and 
29th, Sappony, Union Meeting. 

Monday, Dec. 30th., Sandy Grove. 

Tuesday, Dec. 31st., Peachtree. 

Wednesday, January 1st., Nashville. 

Thursday, January 2nd, Falls. 

Friday, January 3rd., Pleasant Hill. 

Saturday and Sunday, January 4th and 
5th Mill Branch. 

Monday, January 6th. Elm City. 

Tuesday, January 7th., Upper Town 
Creek. 

Wednesday, Jauuary 8th., Autrey's 

Creek. 

Thursday, January 9th., White Oak. 

Friday, January 10th., Aycock. 

Saturday and Sunday, January 11th 
and 12th, Lower Black Creek. 

Monday, January 13th., Memorial. 

Tuesday, January 14th., Pittman's 
Grove. 

Wednesday, January 15th., Upper Black 

Creek. 

Thursday, January 16th., Scotts. 

Friday, January 17th, Healthy Plains. 

Saturday and Sunday, January 18th and 
19th Contentnea. 

Sunday night, January 19th., Wilson. 

Monday night, January 20th, Raleigh. 

TueaMs llfclt, January 21st., Durham. 

WedfiflMy flight, January 22nd. , Me- 
bftAY 

YOurs very truly, 
Elders R. H. *d>well arid E. L. Cobb. 



ZiON'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

■ AT = 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or CLDSCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIII. JANUARY 1, 1930 No. 4 



GOD DIVIDES THE TRIBES OF ISRAEL. 



"And God stirred up another a ~ry, Rezon the son of Eliadah, 
which fled from his lord Hadadeser . of Zobah: 

And he was an adversary to Israel a. , days of Solomon, besides 
the mischief that Hadad did: and he abi- Israel and reigned over 

Syria. 

And Jereboam, the son of Nehat, an Ephrati of Zereda, Solomon's 
servant, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a vudow woman, even he 
lifted up his hand against the king. 

And the man Jereboam was a mighty man of valor: and Solomon see- 
ing the young man that he was industrious, he made him ruler over all 
the charge of the house of Joseph. 

And Ahijah said to Jereboam, thus saith the Lord God of Israel, Be- 
hold I will rend the kingdom out of the hand of Solomon, and will give 
ten tribes to thee: 

But he shall have one tribe for my servant David's sake, and for Jeru- 
salem's sake, the city which I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel, 
because they have forsaken me and worshipped false gods and have not 
walked in my ways. — 1 Kings 12:23-33. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor - - - Winston, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT - - - - Dade City, Fia. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE - - - Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of ZiorTs 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zton'e Xanfcmarh 

2>ew>tet> to the Cause of i^esus Christ 



CHRIST IN THE GARDEN. 

While nature was sinking in still- 
ness to rest, 

The last beam of daylight shone 
dim in the west; 

O'er hills by the moonlight, my wan- 
dering feet, 

Sought in quiet meditation some 
lonely retreat. 

While passing a garden I paused 

for to hear 
A voice faint and plaintive, from 

one that was near; 
The voice of the stranger affected 

my heart 
While in agony pleading the poor 

sinner's part. 

In offering to heaven his piteous 
prayer, 

He spake of the torment the sinner 

must bear; 
His life was the ransom he offered 

to give 

That sinners, redeemed, forever 
should live. 

I paused for a moment, then turned 
to see 

What man of compassion the stran- 
ger could be ; 

I saw him kneeling upon the cold 
ground, 

The loveliest being that ever was 
found. 

His mantle was wet with the dews 

of the night, 
His locks by pale moonlight were 



glittering and bright; 
His eyes like diamonds to heaven 

were raised 
While angels, in wonder, stood 

'round him amazed. 

So deep was his anguish, so perfect 

his prayer, 
And down on his bosom rolled 

sweat, blood and tears; 
I wept to behold him and asked 

him his name ; 
He answered : " 'Tis Jesus, from 

heaven I came:" 

"I am thy Redeemer, for thee I must 
die, 

The cup is most bitter, but cannot 
pass by; 

Thy sins like mountains are laid 
upon me, 

And all this deep sorrow I suffer for 
thee." 

I heard with feeling the tale of his 
woe, 

While tears like a fountain of water 

did flow; 
The cause of his anguish, I hear 

him repeat 
Affected me so that I fell at his feet. 

I trembled with horror, and loudly 
did cry: 

"Save! Save! a poor sinner — O 

save ! or I die : 
He smiled when he saw me, and 

said to me : "Live ! 
Thy sins which are many I freely 

forgive." 



50 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



How sweet at that moment, he bade 
me rejoice, 

His smile so pleasant, how charm- 
ing his voice. 

I fled from the Garden to spread 
it abroad, 

I shouted Hosanna ! and glory to 
God! 

I'm now on my journey to mansions 
above, 

My soul full of glory, of light, peace 

and love: 
I think of the Garden, the prayer 

and the tears 
Of that loving stranger that banish- 
ed my fears. 

The day of bright glory is rolling 
around ; 

When Gabriel descending, the 
trumpet shall sound ; 

My soul then in rapturous joy shall 
rise 

To gaze on that Savour with un- 
clouded eyes. 

Author unknown but is supposed 
to be a vision, or dream of some 
troubled soul in which he found 
peace. 

Lizzie Holden Garrard. 



TO THE LANDMARK READERS 
AND OTHERS. 

I am writing down something of 
the sweet enjoyment I had at the 
Association, held 19th, 20th and 
21st of Oct. 1929. I attended each 
day for which I feel so thankful. 
Its the greatest pleasure of my life 
to be assembled with those whom I 
call my people, the Primitive Bap- 
tists. I forget my cares and trou- 
bles. I feel that I could live on 
mercy's store. It's heaven below 
to poor sinful me. I may never at- 
tend another association here on 



earth, but when I'm called to de- 
part, I have a sweet hope that I'll 
go to the one that never breaks up. 
The Lord has taken care of me 
seventy three years. I can't enum- 
erate the associations he has bless- 
ed me to attend. He has spared 
me to outlive all my dear old par- 
ents' children. I feel like it's for a 
purpose. I hope its to show to the 
dear old Primitive Baptists who 
read this that I love them, and shall 
write to them as long as the Lord 
blesses me with eyesight, and too if 
Mr. Gold will bear with me in pub- 
lishing my writings in the dear old 
Landmark. The Lord has prom- 
ised to never leave nor forsake me. 
Oh, what cheering words. I want 
to praise Him daily. He cares for 
me in my blindness, then opened my 
eyes, gave me ears to hear the joy- 
ful sound of dear ministers at the 
Primitive Associations and else- 
where. 

It's so sad to me to part with so 
many faces that I never expect to 
see again. Elds. Brown, Jones, 
and Collier are all so near their 
journey's end. While I sat and 
viewed the ministers I so much de- 
sired to have their pictures made, 
and I bought a group of them. A 
few of them I had not met before, 
and many that I had seen and heard 
so wonderfully preach the everlast- 
ing gospel I love so well to hear. 
Sunday night services were held at 
the Primitive Baptist Church. I 
did not attend for I felt so fatigued. 
I spent Saturday, Sunday and Mon- 
day nights at the home of Sister 
Carrie Justice on South Second St., 
where I was so kindly cared for. My 
daughter, Mrs. W. B. Humphrey, 
spent Saturday night there, also 
Eld. J. T. Corbitt, Brother N. K. Eu- 
banks, and others. I stayed over 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



51 



until Tuesday and then I met the 
bus and went on with cousin and 
sister Brancy Trott to her lovely 
home, Deppe, where I so joyfully 
spent several days with her Zuila 
and Ida. I can't forget that home. 
It has long been a home for the 
Primitive Baptists. I left there 
with wet eyes. I again met the 
bus and went to Maysville, on my 
way to White Oak quarterly meet- 
ing, 4th Saturday and Sunday in 
October, where I've been a member 
for 24 years, or that is where my 
name is enrolled. Eld. Gurganus 
is our pastor now since Eld. Lundy's 
death. I spent two nights in Mays- 
ville with my dear cousin, Bettie 
Whitley and husband, and had a 
pleasant visit indeed with them. 
There is where I found my book, 
Biographical History of Primitives 
or old school Baptist ministers of 
the United States. I do love to 
view the pictures of the dear old 
soldiers of the cross, especially my 
father, Eld. Job Smith, who de- 
parted this life in 1909. First Sat- 
urday and Sunday, in November, I 
attended the meeting at South 
West. I enjoyed it so well. It had 
one joiner. 

I must say that I went to Sister 
Mary Scott's 27th of October, her 
75th birthday. All her children 
were present. Elders Pollard and 
Gurganus preached and we had 
some lovely singing. On the 28th 
nigM of October I again heard Elds. 
Trent and Obriant preach at the 
home of Mr. John Amans, for the 
benefit of his afflicted wife, sister 
Nellie, who has been a shut in for 
several years. I did so much enjoy 
the preaching that night. 

This year, 1929, will soon be 
gone. I've been around visiting all 
my children except my Georgia 



ones. I hope God will care for 
them. I am back now at my 
daughters in Greenville, N. C, 
1215 Reade St. Any one wishing 
to write me can do so. 

Brother and sister Polland, I 
think of you almost daily. I hope 
all of you old Baptists will pray for 
me. Perhaps someone will stop 
long enough to read this letter. It 
pleases me to write it, for I love 
the Primitive Baptists, and I feel 
that I must tell them so. It is my 
desire to live and die with them. I 
do hope they love me who is the 
most ignorant and least of all . 

SUSAN HIGGINS. 



FALSE WITNESS 

"But there was none like unto 
Ahab which did sell himself to 
work wickedness in the sight of the 
Lord whom Jezebel his wife stirred 
up." 1 Kings 21 :25. 

Thou shalt not bear false witness 
against thy neighbor was one of the 
commandments given in the law to 
Moses the servant of Jehovah. Who 
is your neighbor? was asked Jesus 
one one occasion. It seems, as 
God's law is set forth in both the 
old and new testament that at least 
in the matter of stating Or testifying 
to the truth on oath or otherwise 
one's neighbor would embrace all 
humanity. 

I am endeavoring to set forth 
these truths not from any personal 
desire to be seen or heard but 
from the standpoint of, as I feel it 
to be, a commandment. For truly 
I thought and hoped when I last 
wrote a few impressions on this 
same subject or in connection with 
same that I was through, for I felt 
I probably was encroaching upon 
or taking space in the "Landmark" 
that could be better untlized by 



52 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



other and better contributors, but 
on three different occasions since I 
last wrote I have been shown in 
dreams as I believe that I had a lit- 
tle more work in this connection 
that should be and ought to be 
done. So I am endeavoring to com- 
ply whether it is pleasant on my 
part or otherwise. 

In referring to the dreams 1 
realize the fact that there be some 
that will be ready to say "mental 
weakness" as I have had that 
charge brought against me before, 
but I had always been taught and 
my impressions and feelings were 
that those that were mentally un- 
balanced deserved sympathy and 
consideration instead of trying to 
pull down or destroy one so unfor- 
tunately afflicted. 

Joseph's brethren despised him 
for his dreams and said, "This 
dreamer cometh." If we did only 
as we felt it to be a pleasure on oui 
part or shrank from doing that 
which we felt to be a command- 
ment would there be any sacrifice? 

When Moses was commanded 
to go lead the children of Israel out 
of the land of Egypt he felt he had 
been assigned a hard and undesir- 
able work and work that he did 
not feel qualified to do: for he said 
unto God, "Who am I that I should 
go unto Pharoah and that I should 
bring forth the children of Israel 
out of Egypt." Ex. 3:11, and again 
he said, "But behold they will not 
believe me nor hearken unto my 
voice for they will say, the Lord 
hath not appeared unto thee." Ex. 
4:1. 

When Gideon was commanded 
by the Lord to lead an army against 
the Midianites who had oppressed 
the Israelites for eighteen years, he 
said: "Oh my Lord, wherewith 



shall I save Israel. Behold my fam- 
ily is poor in Manasseh and I am 
the least in my father's house. Jud. 
6:1." 

When the Lord made it known to 
Jonah that he had some work for 
him to do down in Ninevah, Jonah 
decided the work appealed so little 
to him that he would run away and 
let some other fellow do it. And 
he went down to Joppa and down 
in a ship and kept going down un- 
til the Lord had cause to raise him 
up and he was made to cry "Salva- 
tion is of the Lord." 

When God commanded Jeremiah 
to prophesy against Israel for their 
sins, he complained saying: "Oh, 
Lord God, behold I cannot speak, 
for I am a child." He did not feel 
equal to the work assigned him. 
Jer. 1 :6. Isaiah said "Woe is me, 
for I am a man of unclean lips and 
dwell among a people of unclean 
lip." Isa. 6:5. 

More could be said about God's 
servants or messengers of past days 
who realized that they had a rug- 
ged road to travel in this life ful- 
filling the work or purpose of the 
Almighty God. For truth's sake. 
Many were stoned, torn asunder, 
were tempted, slain with the sword, 
some wandering about in sheep- 
skins and goatskins, being desti- 
tute, afflicted, tormented, of whom 
the world was not worthy. They 
wandered in deserts and in moun- 
tains and in dens and caves of the 
earth. 

But to get back to "Ahab" and 
the matter of "Naboth" the "Jezrel- 
ite" whose inheritance or land 
joined unto or was near the king's 
estate. 

it is somewhat difficult to decide 
which were the more wicked Ahab 
or Jezebel, his wife, but it seems 



ZION'3 LANDMARK 



53 



an unquestionable fact that Jezebel 
exerted all her influence of the 
wicked and ungodly nature or 
spirit of which she possessed to 
alienate or turn Ahab, the king, 
away from serving the true God of 
the Hebrews which were being 
preached by "Elijah the prophet," 
to the displeasure of "Jezebel" who 
was introducing a more modern 
religion which was more in accord 
with her ideas and motives. 

That the evil influence of a wick- 
ed and ungodly woman goes a long 
way there is no question as the 
good influence of a good one will 
always manifest itself upon whom 
it is brought to bear. 

It is stated that "Naboth" had a 
vineyard or parcel of ground that 
Ahab desired or coveted because of 
the nearness of it to his own land. 
No doubt Ahab reasoned that he, 
being king over all Israel he should 
have what he desired. So Ahab 
offers to exchange other property 
with "Naboth" or give him the 
worth in money, but Naboth an- 
swers "the Lord forbid that I 
should give thee the inheritance of 
my father." He answered in re- 
ligious tones "The Lord forbid" he 
showed "Ahab" thanks be to God, 
that there were some things that 
could not be bought with a price. 
He held to the sacred traditions of 
the fathers' remove not the "an- 
cient Landmark" meant something 
to him. And "Ahab" well knew 
that "Naboth" had also answered 
him in accordance with the Jewish 
Law, for we find in the thirty sixth 
chapter of Numbers where it reads, 
"So shall not the inheritance of the 
children of Israel remove from tribe 
to tribe, for every one of the chil- 
dren shall keep himself to the in- 
heritance of the tribe of his fath- 



ers." And in Ezekiel also it says: 
Moreover the prince shall not take 
of the people's inheritance by op- 
pression to thrust them out of their 
possessions. 

No doubt Naboth knew the law 
as well as Ahab, but what chance 
did he have naturally speaking to 
fight against Ahab and Jezebel 
when the very government of the 
city in which they lived had got so 
corrupt that those in charge had 
rather believe a lie than the truth 
and were ready to cooperate or 
ally themselves with the ungodly 
element or those of their kind 
which Ahab and Jezebel represent- 
ed. 

Naboth stood upon truth, honesty 
of purpose and law, but when he 
refused to sell Ahab his inheritance 
Ahab went in his house sore and 
displeased and would eat no bread 
and turned his face to the wall. 
Covetousness or selfish desires for 
the carnal things of this world are 
a disease that have afflicted many 
of the present day as it did Ahab 
and Jezebel. It has been said that 
the great Alexander could not 
sleep because he could not get ivy 
to grow in his garden at the palace 
in which he lived at Babylon. And 
it seemed childish and little that 
Ahab, king over all Israel, should 
refuse to eat because he wanted a 
little more land that had been re- 
fused him by "Naboth." 

But if one wants an evil deed or 
purpose accomplished there are al- 
ways those that are ready to help 
or cooperate with them in carrying 
out their ungodly desire, and I have 
more faith in those that come out 
openly and show for what and who 
they stand for, than those that 
through a great show of religious 
and pious attitude aim to cover up 



54 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



or keep in the dark their real mo- 
tives or what they really stand for 
on principle. 

So Jezebel told Ahab he should 
have the land and the foul black 
He was ready to be hurled at "Na- 
both" which would rob him of his 
rights. So she wrote letters to the 
elders saying "Proclaim a fast (act- 
ing religious) set Naboth on high, 
saying Naboth did blaspheme 
against God and the king. Have 
two sons of Belial to witness against 
him and take him out and stone 
him that he may die." 

Jezebel knew who to place on 
the witness stand that would be per- 
fectly willing to carry out her lying 
ungodly purpose. No doubt had 
she so desired she could have got 
two pious and so called religious 
women to have gotten up and 
sworn falsely for her to gain her 
point. That has been done on other 
occasions. And people that should 
stand up boldly for the truth on 
these occasions hang their heads 
and let the lie pass and profess to 
believe it to be the truth for fear 
of those higher up with whom they 
have joined themselves to and love 
their ways (in reality) though pro- 
fess to be followers of the meek 
and lowly one who said "Inasmuch 
as ye did it unto the least of one of 
these ye did it unto me." And also 
said "ye cannot serve two masters." 
How can one love the ungodly, ly- 
ing hypocrisies and an element of 
that kind and be a true follower of 
Christ? But "the heart is deceitful 
above all things and desperately 
wicked and who can know it?" 

What happened in the days of 
"Ahab" are taking place in the 
present age and time. A lie is a lie 
whether three thousand years ago 
or today. The method of applica- 



tion may be different but the prin- 
ciple is the same. It may be a mere 
whisper "and even falsehood is 
made to use signs and gestures" 
and at times silence is made to bear 
witness to untruth. 

High position and being well 
thought of by the people in general 
goes for nothing (in the sight of 
God) when the heart is wrong. 

Great influence means great mis- 
chief when the soul is not in har- 
mony with the spirit of righteous- 
ness. 

When the poor beggar lay at the 
gate of Dives "the certain rich 
man" and the dogs were set upon 
him there were none that came for- 
ward to offer any sympathy or help 
in his distress save the dogs who in- 
stead of hurting him, licked his 
sores. So no one came forward to 
help Naboth when he by their "ly- 
ing testimony" was taken out and 
stoned to death. But I had rather 
been in the place or condition of 
Naboth or the poor beggar as he lay 
at the gate of Dives with no earth- 
ly friends to come forward to offer 
help in their destitution or afflic- 
tion, than to have been as some of 
later days (who after they had ren- 
dered a little financial assistance to 
a less fortunate brother in matters 
of worldly possession) who went 
about and never got through telling 
about how much they had helped 
this brother and it seemed there 
was no appreciation. Was the bro- 
ther expected to get down on his 
knees and continue forever to shout 
forth his praise because he had re- 
ceived a little financial aid from 
him? There don't seem to be 
much charity or sacrifice in good 
works of that kind. 

For the love of money and the 
fear of losing a little of that by 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



55 



which they obtain it there are those 
that will resort to any method to re- 
tain it even if it is to the extent as 
it was in the case of Jezebel, to stir 
up strife in an undermining way, re- 
peat and keep on repeating lying 
statements of ungodly professors 
who "strain at a gnat and swallow 
a camel," who go about saying 
they have a clear conscience, when 
if they were honest enough to ex- 
amine themselves and their own 
heart they would confess that they 
themselves had been and were prin- 
cipally the cause of the trouble and 
strife which had been brought 
about. How can the church pros- 
per, or will it prosper while domi- 
nated or endowed with such a 
spirit? We don't speak what we 
think is true but that which we 
know to be true, that which we 
have seen with our own eyes and 
heard with our own ears. 

Ahab and Jezebel might have 
tried to fool themselves that they 
were doing right in using the 
method they did to obtain their 
ends or desires and that they had 
the laws of the land to back them 
up, but we have the record or testi- 
mony that the time came when they 
stood face to face with judgment 
and pronounced by the Judge of 
the whole earth whose judgment 
will be just; who will not be influ- 
enced by a long and lying tongue 
or speech and will look into the 
hearts of the wicked and say "de- 
part from me ye workers of iniquity 
I never knew you." 

Yours in hope of eternal life, 
W. F. DODSON, 

R .F. D. 5 



GOOD WISHES FOR THE 
LANDMARK. 

Editor Zion's Landmark, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

The package of Zion's Land- 
mark, embracing from September 
the first to October 15th., inclusive, 
have been received, and perused 
to an extent, and according to prom- 
ise, I am now enclosing my check 
to cover one year's subscription to 
the same, and feel sure I will enjoy 
reading it. When I was but a lad, 
in my teens, my oldest brother was 
a subscriber to the paper, and it 
was a great pleasure, even at that 
early date of my life, to peruse its 
pages. I was never a subscriber to 
it but my brother was for a good 
many years, and we living near 
each other, I had the privilege of 
reading the good things therein con- 
tained; and have ever esteemed the 
paper for its contents. Most of 
the writers then have passed on to 
their eternal home; but I feel that 
there are yet a few faithful wit- 
nesses, who are still contending for 
the faith once delivered to the 
saints, and I feel that there will be 
until the time for this world to wind 
up. 

I trust, in time of the many con- 
fusing, and discouraging conditions 
that now confront our people, the 
Old Baptists, that Zion's Landmark 
will continue in the old path, not 
deviating either to the right or to 
the left, and thus by that course, 
continue to feed the poor hungry 
children of the kingdom. For with- 
out this we will be scattered and in 
a way, destroyed. 

"Other refuge have I none; 
Hangs my helpless soul on Thee; 
Leave, O leave me not alone, 



56 



HOWS LANDMARK 



Still support and comfort me." 

Trusting that the present man- 
agement, may be given the abiilty 
to keep the Landmark clean, as its 
former owner, Elder P. D. Gold, I 
am I trust, one of the favored few. 

J. F. McGINTY. 



HISTORY OF PLEASANT GROVE 
BAPTIST CHURCH. 

The church at Pleasant Grove, 
Caswell County, was organized 
September 26, 1829, the presbytery 
consisting of Elders Geo. Roberts 
and Richard Martin. About fifty 
members were enrolled as charter 
members from Lickfork church. Our 
present number is fifty. Elder Geo. 
Roberts was their first pastor and 
the second was Ziba Rice. 

Brother J. D. Chandler was or- 
dained at this church to the minis- 
try in 1831 by Elders John Stadler, 
Welder and Rice. He was their 
next pastor in 1833. Since that 
time their pastors have been Elders 
Robert Shreve, grandfather of El- 
der J. R. Smith, of Reidsville, then 
Joe Gilliam. Elder Gilliam served 
his church for a long time and was 
considered an able minister. He 
was a cousin of Elder J. W. Gil- 
liam, who is our efficient clerk of 
the Upper Country Line Associa- 
tion. 

Elder J. A. Burch followed Elder 
Joe Gilliam. He was chosen pastor 
in 1880 and served until death 
claimed him, being pastor about 25 
years. He was a wonderful man 
and an able, peace loving preacher, 
sound in the faith and doctrine, and 
one whom we all loved and cherish- 
ed. He did not preach for filthy 
lucre but of a ready mind always to 
the praise of God. We still cherish 
his memory, and if he was living to- 



day, we would go as far to hear 
him as any man we know. 

Elder B. B. McKinney, our pres- 
ent pastor, succeeded Elder Burch. 
He has ever been faithful, going 
through cold and heat to be with us. 
He has ever labored to keep the 
unity of the spirit in the bonds of 
peace. He has always preached 
sound doctrine. He loves peace. 

Elder T. A. Stanfield is his assist- 
ant and has been since his ordina- 
tion 

In years gone by the church was 
visited by the following: Elders 
Finch, J. S. Dameron, Q. A. Ward 
and F. L. Oakley. 

Elder F. L. Oakley was the 
grandfather of Elder B. F. McKin- 
ney, the present moderator of our 
association. Elder John Stadler 
was his great grandfather. 

In this day we are visited by El- 
ders J. W. Gilliam, G. M. Trent, J. 
R. Smith and J. V. Spangler. 

Robt. W. Lawson was the first 
clerk, that going to different ones 
— G. W. Cole, W. L. Walker, W. H. 
Brannock, J. T. Thompson, T. A. 
Stanfield, and G. W. Walker, who 
is now clerk. 

The first deacons were Ferry, 
Somers and James Walker. There 
have been many since that day, 
but we will come on up to our time 
which were B. B. McKinney, P. M. 
Walker, J. B. Stanfield, J. H. 
Combs, W. H. Brannock, T. A. Stan- 
field and W. C. Apple. Our pres- 
ent deacons are S. L. Gwyn, H. W. 
Ware and G. W. Walker. 

We feel glad that we have been 
so blest of the Lord to live in peace, 
and to have given us gifts in the 
ministry and good deacons. May all 
praise be His. 

T. A. Stanfield. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 57 



ENJOYS THE LANDMARK 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Brother Gold : 

I am enclosing a check for $2.00 
for the renewal of my subscription 
to the Landmark. 

I enjoy reading the paper so 
much and would hate to miss get- 
ing it. I let my friends read them 
also, and they enjoy them too. 

I had the pleasure of hearing Bro- 
ther Hutchins, from Selma, N. C, 
preach recently at the home of Bro- 
ther J. L. Perdue, as he was pass- 
ing through. His sermon was a 
great inspiration to me and I wish 
I could have the opportunity of 
hearing him often. 

Hoping that the Lord will be 
with you in your good works and 
that the coming year will bring hap- 
piness and success to you and 
family. 

Your sister in hope, 

ORA S. LANCASTER. 
Air Point, Va. 



ENJOYS THE LETTERS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N .C. 
Dear Sir: 

Enclosed find my check for two 
dollars to pay for Zion's Landmark 
for another year from November 
15, 1929 until November 15, 1930. 
I enjoy reading the good letters 
from our dear brothers and sisters. 
It is a feast to me when everything 
is in peace and love with one an- 
other. 

Mrs. John H. Roberson, 
Stokes, N. C. 



ENJOYS READING IT. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Please find enclosed check for 



four dollars ($4.00) which will pay 
for the Landmark up to December 
1930. I should hare sent it sooner, 
but just neglected it. I truly thank 
you for being so kind and sending 
the dear old paper to me as you 
have. I hope to be more prompt 
hereafter. 

I do love the paper and enjoy it 
so much. It has been coming to 
our home for quite awhile and I 
pray that I may never tire of it. 
Sometimes I feel that I only wish 
I could feel to be as good as the 
dear Primitive Baptists seem to be. 

Well, I did not intend to write so 
much, but I have said just a few of 
my thoughts. I pray that you may 
be blessed to continue the Land- 
mark, as your dear father did. 

J. E. WEEKS, 

Stella, N. C. 



ALEX WIGGS 

It is with a sad heart that I attempt to 
write a few lines in loving memory of my 
dear uncle, Alex Wiggs who departed this 
life the twenty-eighth day of May, 1928. 
He was seventy one years old at the time 
of his death. His wife died and left him 
all alone the first day of March, 1928. 
After her death he lived with the writer. 
He was never satisfied any more after her 
death. He would often say he wanted to 
die, too. He felt like he had nothing to 
live for. They never had any children of 
their own. They took me after my mother 
died. It was so hard to give him up, but 
I feel like our good Lord knows best. H« 
was a good and kind father to me. 

He had been a member of the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Pine Level about forty- 
two years. He was clerk of the church at 
the time of his death. He was one among 
the best members of that church and will 
be greatly missed by them all. He was 
always ready to lend a helping hand to 
any body that was in need and to help in 
his church. 

His funeral services were conducted by 
Elder Collier and Elder Wyatt, at the 
Primitive Baptist Church, at Pine Level 
after which he was taken to the Crocker 
graveyard and laid to rest beside his wife 
to await the coming of Christ. 

Written by his heart broken niect. 

BETTIE WOODARD, 

Pine Level, N. C. 



38 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy lathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIII. No. 4 

Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSOnTn. C, JAN. 1, 1930 



PEACE ON EARTH AND GOOD 
WILL TOWARD MEN. 

Peace of mind and soul is a price- 
less heritage. Jesus said, "My 
peace I leave with you, My peace 
I give you." Without this God 
given spirit of peace, men are pow- 
erless as peacemakers. Paul said 
to the Hebrews, "Follow peace 
with all men, and holiness, without 
which no man shall see the Lord." 

We believe, that all men, exer- 
cised by the spirit of Christ, would 
like to do as Paul admonished the 
Romans to do "If possible, live 
peaceably with all men." 

We think, experience teaches us 
all, that: it is not possible, at all 
times and under all circumstances, 
to live peaceably with every one 
with whom we come in contact; 
but where all are under the influ- 
ence of the same spirit, like begets 
like, and if all are earnestly seek- 
ing peace, it is usually found of 
them that seek it. 

The humblest log hut in the land 



is a home fit for a king, if there is 
love and peace reigning in the 
hearts of the inmates; but a man- 
sion is but a hovel, if there is no 
peace within its walls. 

The King of Peace rules in the 
hearts of men and women without 
respect to outward show or posi- 
tion. If the Lord is indeed the good 
shepherd, to the poorest peasant, 
then it can be said of a truth, that 
the peasant is rich far above all the 
wealth of this world. On the other 
hand, all the wealth and position 
and worldly glory, can but make us 
poor in spirit, if we have no hope 
in the better and higher things of 
life, and eternity. 

Isaiah describes the desolation of 
the land in which the Israelites 
dwelt, and says, "The palaces shall 
be forsaken; the multitude of the 
city shall be left, the forts and 
towers shall be for dens (not 
homes) forever, a joy of wild beasts 
a pasture of flocks; until the spirit 
be poured upon us from on high, 
and the wilderness be a fruitful 
field, and the fruitful field be 
counted for a forest. Then Judg- 
ment shall dwell in the wilderness, 
and righteousness remain in the 
fruitful field. 

He does not leave us to guess at 
what the fruits of righteousness are 
but says, "And the work of right- 
eousness, shall be peace and 
the effect of righteousness, quiet- 
ness and assurance forever. And 
My people shall dwell (not may 
dwell) but shall dwell in a peace- 
able habitation, and in sure dwell- 
ings, and in quiet places." Isaiah 
32:14-18. 

No wonder this writer says, "A 
King (King JESUS) shall reign in 
righteousness and princes shall rule 
in Judgment. And a man (The Man 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



B9 



Christ Jesus) shall be as a hiding 
place from the wind, and a covert 
from the tempest; as rivers of water 
in a dry place, as the shadow of a 
great rock in a weary land." 

Peter closes his first epistle with 
these words, "Peace be with you all 
that are in Christ Jesus." Amen. 
This shows to whom this peace 
comes that can calm a burdened 
soul, though storms and tempests 
may rage. "There is a river, the 
streams thereof, shall make glad 
the City of God. This River of 
Peace flows from the throne of God 
and the Lamb, and waters the gar- 
den of His Grace. Jesus said, "Bless- 
ed are the peace-makers; for they 
shall be called the children of 
God." They are the children of 
God, bought with the price of the 
blood of Jesus, shed upon the cross, 
and as such, as kept by His power, 
preserved by his grace and will be 
presented, spotless, in His own 
blessed image of perfection, when 
all will be blest to behold the King 
of Peace in that eternal City of God, 
in which; Peace will be unbroken, 
and joy and life, and love and de- 
light will have no end. Peace be 
unto you all. 

O. J. DENNY. 



PREACH THE WORD. 

The life and substance of this 
word, is the Lord Jesus Christ. "In 
the beginning was the Word, 
the Word was with God, and the 
Word was God, and this same Word 
became flesh and we beheld His 
Glory, full of Grace and Truth." If 
we preach the Word — Christ — the 
living word, we preach the one and 
only word that is full of grace and 
truth. 

If a word or being is full of grace 
and truth, there is no room for any- 



thing else. He is the way, the 
truth and the life. 

If grace and truth, alone, pro- 
ceedeth from this living word or 
fountain there is nothing other than 
all grace, full, free and unmerited, 
can proceed from it. 

If God, through Christ, is truth 
alone, no false theme can proceed 
from such a fountain. James asks 
the question, "Can both sweet and 
bitter waters proceed from the same 
fountain?" 

If Christ, the living word, is all 
life, and the life of His people, 
then death cannot separate the chil- 
dren of God from that life, which is 
hid with Christ in God. No won- 
der we read, "O Death, where is 
thy sting? O Grave! Where is thy 
victory? and then we read, "Thanks 
be to God who giveth us the victory, 
through our Lord Jesus Christ." 
Victory over sin, the power of the 
law and over the power of death 
and the grave. 

What more consoling words can 
be spoken by men, clothed with a 
divine calling, than to so preach or 
teach the Living Word, that all the 
children of promise may be shown 
again and again, the fullness, the 
sweetness and glory of the blessed 
gospel of Christ, ascribing all hon- 
our, glory, dominion and power to 
God and to Christ in the manifes- 
tation of His saving grace, and 
grace alone, wrought out in the 
agony of His sacrificial death upon 
the Cross, in fulfillment of the 
Truth of Divine Prophecy, which 
said, "Behold, a virgin shall be 
with child, and shall bring forth a 
son, and they shall call his name 
Emmanuel, which being interpreted 
is, God with us." 

In fulfillment of prophecy (not 
an angel) ; The Angel of The Lord 



60 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



appeared to Joseph, saying "And 
she shall bring forth a son, and thou 
shalt call His name Jesus: for He 
shall save His people from their 
sins." 

The Prophets and the Angel 
spake the sacred truth. He came, 
He saved. He died and arose. He 
ascended to the Father's throne. He 
is enthroned high above all princi- 
palities and powers, having 
triumphed gloriously over sin, 
death, hell and the grave. 

Paul, to Timothy, his son in the 
ministry, said, Preach the word; 
(The full gospel) be instant in sea- 
son, out of season, reprove, rebuke, 
exhort with all longsuffering and 
doctrine, for the time will come 
when they will not endure sound 
doctrine and shall turn away their 
ears from the truth, and be turned 
unto fables." Again the prophecy 
of the Lord is fulfilled. The Lord 
said my people have committed two 
great evils, they have forsaken the 
foutain of living waters, and have 
hewn themselves out cisterns, yea 
broken cisterns that hold no water. 

Though there has been, and now 
is, and perhaps there will yet be 
those who will turn unto fables, 
still there is no cause for alarm, for 
God is not slack concerning his 
promises, and He has promised to 
save His people with an everlasting 
salvation. 

John in his first epistle says, 
"And this is the promise that He 
hath promised us eternal life. These 
things I have written unto you con- 
cerning them that seduce you; But 
the anointing which we have re- 
ceived of Him (the Living Word) 
abideth in you, and ye need not that 
any man teach you ; but as the same 
anointing teacheth you all things, 
and is truth, and is no lie, and even 



as it hath taught you, ye shall abide 
in Him. And now little children, 
abide in him; that, when he shall 
appear, we may have confidence, 
and not be ashamed before Him at 
His coming. If ye know that He is 
righteous, ye know that every one 
that doeth righteousnes is born of 
Him." 1st John 2:26-29. 

We read in Proverbs, "There is 
a way that seemeth right unto a 
man, but the end thereof is the 
ways of death." This leads us to 
say with David "Search me O God, 
and know my heart; try me, and 
know my thoughts; and see if there 
be any wicked way in me, and lead 
me in the way everlasting. To God 
and to Christ — the living word, be 
all the praise. 

May we not all kneel in humble- 
ness before God and seek to know 
the truth as it is in Christ Jesus. 

Yours in hope, 
O. J. DENNY. 



WHO WAS CHRIST TALKING TO 
IN HIS SERMON ON THE 
MOUNT? 

Several years ago I was on a 
steam boat in the Albemarle Sound, 
N. C. with a certain doctor whom I 
knew very well, and had often seen 
him at Primitive Baptist meetings. 
But I had never heard him express 
himself upon the Bible and religion. 
I had head some of his relatives, 
(many of whom were Primitive 
Baptists) say that the doctor was 
an infidel. A more pleasant gen- 
tleman to meet and talk with one 
would not care to meet, and no one 
seemed more respectful at the meet- 
ings, or more attentive to the 
preaching than he. On the occas- 
ion above referred to there were 
two gentlemen aboard (brothers) 
who were of a different family of 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



61 



Baptists and by some means, which 
I do not now remember they and 
the doctor got into a discussion of 
the Bible. The talk had not con- 
tinued long before all present saw 
that the doctor had read the Bible. 
No one present could tell more of 
what it said than he. But he seem- 
ed to doubt its teaching. The men 
who were talking with him were 
preaching their man power and 
man righteous ideas to him, and 
among the rest I now remember 
that they quoted Moses to him. He 
said "That is no evidence to me. I 
do not know anything of Moses. He 
may have been just a religious 
crank, just like you fellows, for 
aught I know. Don't tell me what 
others have said. Show this mat- 
ter to me." Up to this point I had 
said nothing and while it was mor- 
tifying to hear one question the 
truth of the Bible, yet I could not 
but be amused to see him head off 
their every effort. Here the doc- 
tor turned to me and said: "Mr. 
Rowe, who was Christ talking to in 
his sermon on the mount." I said 
Doctor I cannot talk with you about 
these matters, as when I talk about 
these things I go to the Bible and 
when I can give the Bible as proof 
of what I say I feel safe. I have 
some experience, Doctor, that as- 
sures me of the truth of the Bible 
and of the existence of an Al- 
mighty, ever living and merciful 
God, and that Jesus Christ is His 
Son. But if I were to tell it to you 
it would be hearsay to you just like 
what Moses has said. So I have 
nothing else to offer you. Then 
the doctor said "We will admit 
that there is a God, and that Jesus 
Christ is His Son. Who was he 
talking to in His sermon on the 
mount?" I replied, "Dr. I will let 



the apostle that recorded the ser- 
mon answer.- : He began by saying, 
"And seeing-. the multitude he went 
into the mountain apart. And when 
he was set, his disciples came to 
him, and he opened his mouth and 
taught them, saying thus and so. I 
feel, Doctor, that I have the right 
to say that there was no one pres- 
ent even in hearing of him, besides 
,js disciples. So the teaching was 
especially for and exclusively to his 
disciples. And these disciples were 
those whom- he had called saying, 
Follow me, or those who received 
him because they were born again 
before he came. John 1 :11-13. Jesus 
said, "Ye have not chosen me, but 
I have chosen you," and having 
chosen them he had an especial 
purpose in doing so, that they 
should go and bring forth fruit. 
And in order that they should bring 
forth the right kind of fruit he gives 
them especial directions that he 
does not give to the world, and this 
is not to make them the children of 
God, but because they are. Here 
the doctor said, "If Jesus Christ 
was the Soji of God, then he is the 
Son of God now. And if he had 
true followers then he has true fol- 
lowers now. Who does that teach- 
ing apply to now?" 

I answer, the same class of 
characters, for he does have true 
followers now, for he said I will 
never leave myself without a wit- 
ness, and he not only calls, but he 
qualifies his witnesses by giving 
them personal knowledge of him- 
self for it is of him they are to tes- 
tify and their testimony is that it 
is Jesus that saves sinners, and no 
one can testify of Christ unless and 
until the Father has revealed Jesus 
to him or her. And to show that 
the Lord deals with his chosen now 



62 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



as in the past, Paul says to the Ga- 
latians "Now we brethren as Isaac 
was, are children of promise." Ga- 
latians 4 :28. God has promised 
Sonship and He, Himself, comes in- 
to the hearts of sinners and by di- 
vine teaching makes the sinner to 
know himself as a great sinner and 
to know Jesus as the Son of God 
and that he is indeed a Saviour and 
the only one. 

All this time the doctor had lis- 
tened very attentively and respect- 
fully, and when I was through, ad- 
dressing the company he said, 
"Gentlemen if there is anything to 
this it is as Mr. Rowe says. I know 
nothing of the especial revelation 
he talks about and so have nothing 
to say. And pointing to the gentle- 
men before referred to, he said, "I 
know there is nothing in what they 
say." "They call me infidel. I 
do not know whether I am or not. 
I would not dare say there is no 
God, but gentlemen as an honest 
man I have to say I do not know 
anything about him." And after 
all was over I felt that the doctor 
knew as much about God as those 
who were trying to instruct him. 

"The natural man receiveth not 
the things of the Spirit of God. 
Neither can he know them, because 
they were spiritually discerned." 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas God in his infinite wisdom has 
railed home our beloved sister Mollie 
Malone, we wish to bow in humble sub- 
mission to Him who doeth all things well. 

Sister Malone was born on September 
12th, 1855, quietly and peacefully fell 
asleep Nov. 23rd, 19 29. 

She was baptized into the fellowship of 
Mebane Church April 10th. 19 26 by her 
nephew, our beloved deceased pastor Eld. 
C. B. Hall. She has ever been a loyal and 
faithful member of our body, Therefore 
he it resolved. 

1st, That in passing of our dear sistei 
Malone our church has lost one of her 



most esteemed members, while we shall 
miss her cheerful presence we believe our 
loss is her eternal gain, that she is now 
resting where there is no more sickness 
and sorrow, pain and death, but all but 
love is done away. 

It is not death to die 

To leave this weary road, 

And 'midst the brotherhood on high 

To be at home with God. 

2nd, That we extend our tender love 
and sympathy to the bereaved ones, I rust- 
ing that the God of all grace may comfort 
and sustain them in every trial which they 
may be called to pass through, and lead 
them in the way of truth. 

3rd, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to Zion's Landmark for publication 
and a copy be placed upon our church 
record. 

Done by order of conference. 
December 7th., 19 29. 

T. F. ADAMS, Mod. 
W. F. CLAYTON, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF PEACE. 

Whereas the Eternal God has in his in- 
finite wisdom removed from the midst of 
his family, friends, and the church at 
Sandy Grove, Nash Gounty, by the death 
of our Brother J. Wiley Edwards, who 
was born April 1885, died July 1, 19 29, 
making his stay on earth forty-four years. 
He united with Rada Joyner, and to this 
union there were born nine children. One 
preceding him to the grave in 19 21, leav- 
ing a loving wife, five boys and three 
girls to mourn the loss of a good husband 
and a loving father. 

1 visited Brother Edwards right much 
and always found his to be a loving home. 
He liked to talk of the Lord and His sav- 
ing grace and mercy. 

This father was Mr. W. F. Edwards, and 
his mother Mrs. Elizabeth Edwards, both 
preceding him to the grave. His mother 
was a. true member at Sappony Church. 
His father was a lover of the Old School 
Baptists, but never united with the church, 
but he reared a large family of children. 
The writer was personally acquainted with 
all of them. They are as follows: 

Mr. W. R. Edwards, Spring Hope. N. C. 

Mr. Nero Edwards, Nashville, N. C. 

Mr. Dalmadge Edwards. Spring Hope. 

Mr. Charlie Edwards. Spring Hope. N.C. 

Mr. G. W. Edwards, Spring Hope, N. C. 

Sister Wiley T. Lamm. Spring Hope. 

Sister W. T. Baker, Spring Hope, X. C 

Mrs. W. R. Cooper, Spring Hope. X. (' 

Mrs. W. E. Morgan, Spring Hope, N. C. 

W. H. Abernathy, Spring Hope, N. C. 

J. T. Abernathy, Spring Hope, N. C. 

Sister Mary Sherron. 

Mrs. E. W. Pridgen, Spring Hope. N. C. 
Brother Edwards came before the 
church at Sandy Grove, August 4, 1922, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



63 



and was receiver! and baptized August 5, 
hy our Pastor Elder 0. W. Roswell. 

Therefore, be it resolved: 

L. That wo bow in humble submission 
to the will of an all wise Cod who doeth 
all things well feeling our loss is his eter- 
nal gain. 

2. That a copy of these resolutions be 
Bent to his family, also a copy to Zion's 
Landmark for publication, and a copy re- 
corded on our church record. 
Written by order of conference. 

Elder G. W. Boswell, Moderator, 
J. B. Murray, Church Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas it has pleased our heavenly- 
fa t her to call from time our dear brother, 
J. M. Stone, who was born Aug. 29, 1855, 
united with the Primitive Baptist Church 
at New Hope about 180 2, and departed 
this life July 28, 19 29, making his stay on 
earth 74 years and 29 days. 

Therefore be it resolved, that we bow in 
bumble submission to the will of Almighty 
Cod who giveth and taketh away, blessed 
he his name. Be it further resolved, that 
we record the same on our church records 
and that we send a copy to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication. 

Done by order of the church at Gift in 
('(inference. Saturday, November 16, 1929. 

G. M. Stewart, Moderator 
G. C. Langdon, Clerk. 



FOR ELDER STEPHENSON 

Mrs. Martha N. Walton. Jacksonville, 
N. C. $2.00. 



\PPOLNTMENTS FOR ELDER M. F. 
WESTBROOK. 

Durham, Monday, Night, Jan. 6th. 1930. 
Mt. Lebanon, Tuesday, Jan. 7th. 
Rougemont, Tues. Night, January 7th. 
Camp Creek, Wednesday, Jan. 8th. 
Tar River, Thursday, Jan. 9th. 
Surles, Friday, Jan. 10th. 
Flat River, Saturday, Jan. 11th. 
Roxboro, Saturday night, Jan. 11th. 
Wheelers. Sunday, Jan. 12th. 
Prospect Hill, Monday, Jan. 13th. 
Bush Arbor, Tuesday, Jan. 14th. 
Pleasant Grove. Wed., Jan. 15th. 
Gilliams, Thursday, Jan. 16th. 
Burlington, Thursday night, Jan. Kith. 
Harmony, Friday, Jan. 17th. 
Mebane, Friday Night, Jan. 17th. 
Conveyance needed when off the Rail- 
road. 

Appointments arranged by L. H. Hill, 
Selma, N. C. 



C. J. MOORE, Jr. 
Sunday evening Nov. 24, between the 
hours of 12:00 and 1:00 o'clock, a death 
angel came and hovered over the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Moore, lingering only 
;< few moments and disappeared, bearing 
their beloved son, C. J., Jr. He had been 
confined to his bed for eleven months, and 



never has there been a child any more pa- 
tient than he was during his afflictions. 
He never complained and always when en- 
tering the room he wore a pleasant smile 
and was glad for any one to visit him. 

All his relatives, friends, and neigbors 
did all they could to make him brighter, 
his bed being heaped around him with 
all kinds of toys you could mention, he 
spent many hours amusing himself with 
them, excepting his greatest suffering 
when, he cared nothing for toys. 

His parents never tired of nursing him 
and especially his mother whom God bless- 
ed with health to care for him tenderly 
during the eleven long months he suffer- 
ed. They did all that was in their power 
to do for him. Doctors too numerous to 
mention attended him. He spent one 
week in Rex Hospital, Raleigh, and later 
went to John Hopkins in Baltimore, but 
it was beyond the skill of the best learn- 
ed doctors to know the exact cause of his 
illness. 

His only desire was to live to see his 
eighth birthday, and I feel our good Lord 
spared him in order that his wish be 
granted, as he was born between the hours 
of 12:00 and 1:00 o'clock, Nov. 24, 1921, 
and passed out of this world at the same 
hour he entered. 

Saturday before he died on Sunday he 
celled his mother and father and all that 
were there at that time to his bed and ask- 
ed them to pray for him. They told him 
they would that night. He said no, pray 
now. I wont be with you much longer, 
and I'm going to pray with you. How 
wonderful for such a small child to feel 
the need of prayer and to talk about the 
dealings of the Lord, he often asked that 
the Bible be read to him. 

So his parents and near relatives may 
rest assured that he was a child of God, 
and is now safe in the arms of Jesus 
where he'll have no sorrow, pain nor dis- 
appointments, but that eternal home 
where nothing but plesaure, peace and 
happiness dwell. 

A close relative. 



J. I. WOODARD 

The subject of this notice died Septem- 
ber 9th., 1929. He was 80 years, 3 mouths 
and 5 days old. Papa had been in declin- 
ing health for four years. He was the 
father of 10 children, all who lived to be 
grown, 1 girl and 2 boys preceded him to 
the grave. He had been a member of 
the Primitive Baptist church for more 
than fifty years, was deacon for a num- 
ber of years. After his health failed he 
asked for an assistant, but he remained 
deacon as long as he lived. He was never 
too busy to go to church, and he always 
filled his seat, unless providentially hin- 
dered. He always wanted his children to 
go too. Elder Collier went to his home 
several times and preached, much to his 



64 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



comfort. I never saw anyone more will- 
ing to die than he was. He spoke of 
flying almost every day, for the past three 
years, said if he only knew he was born 
of the spirit, but felt he was willing and 
would be ready any time when his father 
called child come home. I don't think 
papa had an enemy, he was always meek, 
jrentle and slow to speak, wanted to treat 
his fellow man right. He would tell mo- 
ther day after day she would be better off 
without him, he was so much trouble. As 
he grew weaker in body, he seemed to 
grow stronger in spirit until the last. All 
was done for him that a loving wife, chil- 
dren and kind friends could, but the time 
had come and he must go. We weep, not 
without hope, that he is sweetly resting 
in the Paradise of God. 

We desire the prayers of all who have 
a mind to remember us in the loss of our 
dear husband and father, that we may 
meet where all is love. 

Written by his daughter, 

MRS. C. F. BROADWELL 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

I am writing this in memory of a dear 
sister of our church Jackie Ann Bone. 
She wa» born in Nash County May 15th 
1855 and died Jan. 7th, 1929. She was 
married several years ago to Heywood 
Bone, who did not live long after their 
marriage. No children were born to this 
union. She was a member of the Mis- 
sionary Baptist Church for about 30 years, 
joining the Primitive Baptist Church at 
Sandy Grove in the year of July 2, 1927 
being baptized the following morning by 
her pastor Elder G. W. Boswell. 

She lived in a small two room house in 
Spring Hope and had for the last ten or 
twelve years, and prior to this she lived 
with her mother, taking care of her blind 
mother with the most tender care and 
love. To make the acquaintance of Sister 
Bone was to love her, she was a good 
neighbor and friend. Was very kind to 
everybody and did not have an enemy that 
she knew of at her death. She did not 
like to speak unkindly of any one, she 
owed no one any harm, she lived quietly 
and peacefully in her little home, and 
friends calling to see her would hear her 
remark that she was not lonesome for her 
Jesus was with her constantly and gave 
her comfort all along the way. She could 
not read, but she had that sweet revela- 
tion of the scripture along from time to 
time and she said it was so sweet to her. 
She was very true to her church and to 
her God. She was always praising the 
Lord for the good things he had done for 
her. Her desire before death was that 
she would not have to suffer long, which 
she did not. She was seriously sick for 3 
days, with pneumonia and erysipelas, but 
she bore her suffering with patience, not 
grumbling in the least, but putting all her 
faith in Jesus. She passed out quietly 



and after death she looked so good, her 
expression almost spoke that she had 
passed over the river and was resting in 
the arms of her blessed Jesus, who had 
been so good to her for these many years. 
Brother R. H. Boswell of Wilson conduct- 
ed the funeral services, after which the 
remains were conveyed to the Cemetery in 
Spring Hope and there laid to rest. 

Written by C. B. Brantley. 

ANNIE WmTE~BUTTS 

With sad hearts and a deep feeling of 
loneliness we chronicle the death of our 
precious sister, Annie Butts, September 30, 
1929. 

Resolved, 1st. That we, in our weakness, 
emulate her Christian walk and peaceful 
influence in this life. 

2nd. That we extend our heartfelt sym- 
pathy to her family. 

3rd. That we send a copy of these reso- 
lutions to Landmark for publication, plac- 
ing same on our church hooks. 

Done by order of the church Saturday 
before the third Sunday in October, 19 29. 

A. B. DENSON, Moderator 
WILLIE RIDDICK, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Since it was the will of our Heavenly 
Father to remove from our midst our be- 
loved sister, Catherine Patrick into the 
great beyond, where we feel she has taken 
up her abode with all the redeemed of the 
Lord, where she can sing on in vast eter- 
nty to God and the Lamb, forevermore. It 
seems so hard to part from our loved ones, 
but God knows best. 

She was born March 11, 1851, died 
Feb. 24, 1929. She joined the church at 
Hancocks when she was a young woman, 
(date not known by me), and was a faith- 
ful member as long as she was able to at- 
tend. She was sick about eight months, 
and died at the home of her daughter in 
Ayden. Her funeral was conducted by 
her assistant pastor, Bro. J. B. Roberts of 
Greenville, and her burial was in Ayden 
cemetery, beside her husband who pre- 
ceeded her to the grave about six and one 
half years. She leaves four children: 
Mrs. Eugene Cox, of Greensboro, N. C, 
Mrs. Will J. Boyd, of Ayden, N. C, W. Ed. 
Patrick, Washington, N. C, Joseph Pat- 
rick, Ayden, N. C., and several nieces and 
nephews. \- 

Now, therefore, we bow in humble sub- 
mission to the will of our heavenly Father. 
Resolved, the church at Hancock has lost 
a faithful member. That a copy of the 
resolutions be spread on our church book 
and a copy be sent to Zion's aLndmrak for 
publication and a copy sent to each of her 
children. 

Done by order of conference at Han- 
cock's church, May 18, 19 29. 

PATTIE WORTH INGTON, 
W. M. MONSEES Mod. 
B. R. BINGHAM, Clerk 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 



- AT ^^^^^^^^^^ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII. JANUARY 15, 1930 No. 5 



REHOBOAM BBC // \ TYRANT. 



"And Rehoboam went to Sheckem: for all * '' 'Vre come to Sheckem 
to make him king. ' /( 

And it came to pass, when Jeroboam, the son or~v, who was yet in 

Egypt, heard of it, for (he was fled from the presence of King Solomon, 
and Jereboam dwelt in Egypt;) 

That they sent and called him, And Jeroboam, and all the congrega- 
tion of Israel came and spake unto Rehoboam, saying, Thy father made 
our yoke grievous: now therefore make thou the grievous service of thy 
father, and his heavy yoke, which he put on us lighter, and we will serve 
thee. 

And he said unto them, depart yet for three days, then come again to 
me, and the people departed. 

And king Rehoboam consulted with the older men, that stood before 
Solomon his father, while he yet lived, and said, How do ye advise that I 
may answer this people? 

If thou wilt be a servant unto this people this day and will serve them, 
and answer them, and speak good words to them, then they will be thy 
servants forever. 

But he forsook the counsel of the old men, which they had given him 
and consulted with the young men that were grown up with him, and 
which stood before him, and spake to them after the counsel of the 
young men, saying, My father made your yoke heavy, and I will add to 
your yoke: my father chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you 
with scorpions." 1 Kings 12:1-14. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor - - - Winston. N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT - - - - Dade City/ Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE - - - Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Z ion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



gion'e Xanfcmarfc 



uevoteb to tbe Cause of 3esus Cbnst 



HYMN OF THE WALDENSES. 

"Hear, Father, hear thy faint af- 
flicted flock 

Cry to thee, from the desert and the 
rock; 

While those who seek to slay thy 

children hold 
Blasphemous worship under roofs 

of gold; 

And the broad goodly lands, with 

pleasant airs 
That nurse the grape and wave the 

grain, are theirs. 

Yet better wei*e this mountain wil- 
derness, 

And this wild life of danger and 

distress — 
Watchings by night and perilous 

flight by day 
And meetings in the depths of earth 

to pray, 

Belter, far better, than to kneel 

with them, 
And pay the impious rite thy laws 

condemn. 

Thou, Lord, dost hold the thunder; 

the firm land 
Tosses in billows when it feels thy 

hand ; 

Thou dashest nation against nation, 
then 

Stillest the angry world to peace 
again. 

Oh ! touch their stony hearts who 

hunt thy sons — 
The murderers of our wives and 

little ones. 



Yet, Mighty God, yet shall thy 

frown look forth 
Unveiled, and terribly shall shake 

the earth: 
Then the foul power of priestly sin 

and all 

Its long-upheld idolatries shall fall 
Thou shalt raise up the trampled 

and oppressed, 
And thy delivered saints shall 

dwell in rest." 

— Bryant. 

The Waldenses were the Primi- 
tive Baptists, the chosen and or- 
dained people of God, who 
refuge in the Alps mountains in 
their day of persecution; before 
they came to America, under the 
leadership of Roger Williams; 
known in history as Pilgrims, and 
landed at Plymouth Rock in the 
year 1620. If this statement is not 
correct I will thank some of the 
brethren to give the right informa- 
tion ; as we are anxious to know 
the truth about this wonderful peo- 
ple. 

— Lizzie Holden Garrard. 



THE DOCTRINE OF GRACE. 

Mrs. Effie H. Carawan, 

Swan Quarter, N. C, 
Dearly Beloved oi the Lord, saved 
in the Lord with an everlasting 
salvation : 

The doctrine of Grace is a most 
wonderful doctrine. It is God hon- 
oring and soul comforting. It has 
been in all ages a most wonderful 
theme and how few believe in it, 



60 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



and most really despise it, and don't 
have any use for those that believe 
it. They are poor blind souls, and 
when the blind lead the blind both 
fall into the ditch. I have loved it 
for nearly 60 years, and have been 
proclaiming it abroad far and near 
53 years last month, and today I do 
not see any reason why I should 
change one principle of truth that. I 
have preached from the first. I 
will name some of them. 1st, Fore- 
knowledge. 2nd, Predestination. 
3rd, Election. 4th. Redemption. 
5th Salvation by grace. 5th Resur- 
rection of the Dead, which takes in 
the redeemed sinner, body, soul and 
Spirit. 7th The Glorification of 
the Whole Family of God, these are 
all embraced in the predestination 
of God, and to make it complete we 
will add the Admonition and Ex- 
hortation of the Apostles. These 
from the first to the 7th with the 
admonitions and exhortations, pre- 
sent the full complete and perfect 
Gospel of God our Saviour, without 
any prefixes, affixes, or words coin- 
ed by uninspired men, even our so 
called able ministers in the gospel 
embraces the power of God, and 
the wisdom of God. Not the power 
of man and the wisdom of man, for 
man by earthly wisdom knows not 
God. The religion of Jesus Christ 
is a revealed religion, from start to 
finish. Not one atom comes from 
any earthly source, and every one of 
the foundation principles that T 
have named from the first to the 
7th is given to His elect people in 
the same way. I wish to be under- 
stood that I mean from a spiritual 
standpoint, and I am glad it is so. 
Jesus himself said that God him- 
self had hid these things from the 
wise and the prudent and revealed 
them unto babes, and then said, 



Even so Father, for so it seemed 
good in thy sight? It is a wonder 
of wonders, that such poor un- 
worthy sinful worms of the dust as 
we are, should even dare hope that 
we have the least knowledge of 
such deep, unsearchable mysteri- 
ous things, but when we hear them 
set forth by God's called servants, 
and they come home to us with 
power and much assurance in the 
Holy Ghost, we feel to say, I know 
that this is the gospel, preached 
with power from on high, and it is 
spiritual manna to our hungry soul. 

0 how I have feasted upon the 
wonderful sermons, that I have 
heard the old servants of God 
preach in my day. The very 
heavens seem to be opened up to 
their view, and I, a poor ignorant 
creature, was given an ear to hear, 
and a heart to understand what 
they preached, and I loved it. and 
I loved those dear old tried servants 
of God. But they have gone to 
their reward, and others have been 
raised up to proclaim the glad tid- 
ings of salvation through Jesus 
Christ our Lord, and I have several 
.others in my mind at this time, that 
I believe will be placed upon the 
walls of Zion to proclaim the un- 
searchable riches of Christ, to feed 
the sheep and lambs of his fold 
when needed. God will care for his 
own dear people. He loves them 
too well to neglect them, and he will 
bring them off conquerors and 
more than conquerors, through him 
that loved them, and gave himself 
for them. Why should they not love 
him and serve him with gladness of 
heart? A true servant is in subjec- 
tion to his master, not a comman- 
der, or dictator. They will not 
lord it over God's heritage. They 
are not greedy dogs or hirelings. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



G7 



They cannot set a price on the Gos- 
pel, or their services as ministers of 
Gospel. Not many old school Bap- 
tist Ministers have any income out- 
side of what they get from the 
churches they serve, but as far as I 
Know the churches are kind and 
faithful enough to look after the 
needs of their pastors, but I have 
seen a few reports where good 
faithful, acceptable servants with 
their wives and families have 
been grossly neglected. Such 
churches are not worthy of a pas- 
tor. I am not saying that all pas- 
tors are worthy of support. In 
such cases if the church is alive and 
awake to a sense of their duty, they 
will drop them and not starve them 
out, and to recommend them to an- 
other church would be an imposi- 
tion. 

Sister Carawan, I have written 
what I have written. If it com- 
mends itself to your faith you may 
have it published, if it is also ac- 
ceptable to the publisher or editor. 
As you have given your consent T 
will send your good letters to be 
published, have sent one of them 
already. God bless you. 

I am glad that you know Bettie 
Z. Whitley. She writes a lovely 
letter. 

Yours in Christian love from my 
wife and myself, 

D. M. VAIL, 

28 Williard St., 
Hit;ghampton, N. Y. 



PREACHING THE GOSPEL. 

The meaning of "Gospel" is 
"Glad tidings of salvation through 
Jesus Christ." The eternal . God 
provides the tidings against the will 
of the man who bears it, and he 
runs to bear tidings of what he sees 
and knows. "He receives it not of 



man." And "Woe is me if I preach 
not the gospel." The church may 
provide credentials to a person, but 
this does not cause him to preach — 
he must be called of God as was 
Aaron. God calls and qualifies. 
He is an honor to all, and if one 
member be honored all are honor- 
ed with it. 

The church can't decide his fields 
of labor: "Come over into Mace- 
donia and help us," "when he as- 
sayed to go into Asia." (Paul.) We 
say above, the church can't decide 
his fields of labor, and the Bible 
authorizes us to say he can't decide 
this for himself, but God opens up 
the field and there he must labor, if 
labor at all in accord with the will 
and purpose of God. To refuse 
him or his counsel is to reject the 
testimony of God, for God is with 
him. And to refuse to obey him is 
to stand in disobedience to the Al- 
mighty. "It is a fearful thing to 
fall into the hands of the living 
God." And those who fail of giv- 
ing heed to his words will experi- 
ence this fall. I will send thee far 
hence among the Gentiles," and he 
conferred not with flesh and blood. 
The angel bade Phillip to arise and 
go south. And the Spirit told him 
to join himself to the chariot in 
which the eunuch rode. The eunuch 
felt the need of a minister, he 
said, "How can I except some man 
guide me." 

"God made choice among us," 
etc. The case of Jonah to the Nine- 
vites shows how God deals or works 
in this thing. The people of Nine- 
vah repented at. the preaching of 
Jonah, for God said to him: "Go to 
Ninevah and preach the preaching 
I bid thee." Peter was led to the 
house of Cornelius against his own 
vows and determination. See God 



68 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



in this case from first to last in the 
divine arrangement. 

God was at both ends of the rope, 
for He prepared that congregation, 
and prepared the preacher. The 
rain and the snow have as much 
to do in being received by the earth 
as such characters for "My word 
shall not return unto me void." 

These thoughts cause a serious- 
ness with me never experienced be- 
fore. This is the gospel age, and 
forms one of the three dispensa- 
tions, and hence it is God's work, 
and I am afraid to tamper with it. 
"If they receive not you, they re- 
ceive not me." "You received me as 
an angel of God; even as the Lord 
Jesus." (Paul). 

Paul said to the Jews "It was 
needful that the word should have 
first been spoken to you, but seeing 
ye put these things from you." How* 
fearful; how fearful. 

What greater desolation can we 
experience than that which God will 
bring to pass when the gospel must 
fly away. 

In Lloyd's collection of hymns. 
No. 566, we find the following: 

"Lord must thy gospel fly away, 
And all thy mercies be removed, 

And we to sin become a prey, 
And all our talents misimproved 

Oh! must we bid our God adieu? 
And must the gospel take its 
flight? 

Oh! shall our children never view 
The beamings of thy heavenly 
light?" 

But we must notice the 3rd verse 
of hymn 565 : 

"Where once thy churches prayed 
and sung, 



Thy foes profanely rage ; 
Amid thy gates their ensigns hang, 
And there their host engage." 

"Let us give the more earnest 
heed to the things we have heard; 
lest at any time we should let them 
slip." 

The credentials we receive from 
the church does not help us to 
preach, and though we hold it as a 
good rule to give such documents 
when one is ordained, still as it is a 
mere custom to do so, we should 
consider this subject well. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



A LITTLE HOPE. 

Dear Friend : 

I have had a mind to write of my 
humble hope ever since I was so 
sick. I am not a member of the 
church, but I have a little hope now, 
after praying to my dear loving Sav- 
iour in the lonely house while all 
are asleep but me, begging Him 
to guide my weak and trembling 
hand. It seems that his presence is 
near me, and I will try to write a 
little of my experience if I have one. 
I have rejoiced over it so many 
times and I would not take ten 
thousand worlds like this for it. 
When I was so sick my bones ached 
so much, one day I was feeling so 
badly I went and lay down on the 
edge of the bed. All at once that 
awful hurting left me. I felt so 
good and as light as a flying feath- 
er. I closed my eyes in perfect 
ease. It looked like the heavens 
opened, everything was so bright. 
I thought I had found a sweet Sav- 
iour. I wanted to die and begged 
to die, so that I could go to rest with 
him. I was so happy I did not want 
anyone to see me. I wanted to 
hear some good preaching. I 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



69 



thought they might tell about the 
heavenly Father, but I felt so little 
and like one alone I would tell no 
one my feelings. I thought there 
was no one like me. I have always 
loved the Primitive Baptists. If I 
can feel as I have at times I shall 
not fear death when I am called to 
die. But I have doubts and fears, 
ups and downs. Yet it seems my 
way is growing brighter every day. 
I beg the prayers of all you good 
people to pray for one like me, 
and my dear husband and three 
little daughters. He said for us to 
pray for our enemies. I can do that 
by his help. I feel that my heart is 
in prayer most of the time. I have 
a strong faith in him. All this is 
better to me than gold, when I can 
see my way clear. Oh this is not 
all, it is just a part. 

One in hope of a better world 
when done with this one. 

MRS. PAUL E. LESTER, 
Roanoke, Va., Route 2. 



A GOOD MEETING. 

Elder S. B. Denny, 

Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Brother in Christ I hope : 

I will tonight take great pleasure 
in writing to you. Bessie and my- 
self went to the yearly meeting at 
Meadow church Saturday. Bro. 
Harrison preached a powerful ser- 
mon to us. We also heard him 
preach a sweet and comforting ser- 
mon at Upper Town Creek church, 
third Sunday. We were blessed to 
attend the yearly meeting at Great 
Swamp church fourth Sunday. You 
preached a powerful sermon to us. 
You spoke of several points in your 
preaching today that my mind exer- 
sized and soul feasted upon. You 
spoke of those preachers who we 
believe are now "sleeping the bless- 



ed sleep from whence none ever 
wake to weep." Sometimes now I 
feast upon the sweet gospel ser- 
mons they preached while here in 
this sinful world. I greatly miss 
Elder Hooks, Bro. Hall, Bro. Gold, 
your aged father, and Elder C. F. 
Denny, who was so near and dear 
to me. He was so Christ like, he 
preached the truth .in Christ Jesus. 
And I want to say we also enjoyed 
the preaching of dear Elder Mon- 
sees at the yearly meeting at Red 
Banks, second Saturday and Sun- 
day in September. He is feeble but 
his preaching was wonderful. 

These words are upon my mind, 
"Behold how good and how pleas- 
ant it is for brethren to dwell to- 
gether in unity." How often does 
Jesus admonish His following "to 
love one another;" and Himself de- 
clares it an evidence of His indwell- 
ing spirit when we do love one an- 
other. How sweetly do these 
words fall upon the ear, coming 
from His own dear, divine lips: 
"This is my commandment, that ye 
love one another as I have loved 
you." "As I have loved you!" Oh! 
how precious such words. How has 
He loved us? Why so dearly that 
He gave even His life for us, that 
He saved us even though we were 
dead in trespasses and sins. If, 
then, He so loved us, ought not we 
to find it easy to love one another, 
to forgive one another, and over- 
look each other's faults? Oh! dear 
ones we want to be gentle with 
those who err, ever ready to for- 
give, and desirous to have them 
turn from the error and evil of 
their ways. How terrible it must 
be to feel bitter against one of His 
little ones. But when, under the 
influence of the Spirit which 
"thinketh no evil," how easy it is to 



YO 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



love our brethren, how pleasant "to 
dwell together in unity," and to sit 
under the shadow of our King- 
Emanuel with great delight. May 
the dear Lord bless you and sister 
Denny. 

Your little brother and sister I 
hope, 

MR. and MRS. Z. R. GAY, 
Farmville, N. C. 



GOOD WISHES FOR THE 
LANDMARK. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Please find enclosed check for 
$2.00 for my subscription to the 
Landmark until April 1930. Hope 
you will pardon me for my delay in 
renewing my subscription for I 
have been impressed to do so for 
some time but kept putting it off un- 
til now. May the Lord bless you 
and with your work the coming 
year, as I feel he has through the 
past year. "For if God be for us 
who can be against us," says one of 
old. And I believe it's true until 
this day. For I believe God's plans 
and ways will stand through all 
eternity. 

Your brother in Christ I hope, 
J. F. HAMLETT, 
Charlotte C. H., Va. 



LOVES THE LANDMARK 

Mr. Gold: 

I will send you two dollars to pay 
for the Landmark which I should 
have sent before now and please 
send it to Crawford, Colorado, as I 
am old and forgetful I am past 
four score, so please excuse this. 1 
love the paper and I remember 
well when your father and others 
used to come up to Cross Roads in 
Grayson County, Va., and preach 



for us. Oh how it did feed my 
poor hungry soul. Oh that we had 
some true, gospel preacher here in 
this part of the world. I will close 
as I am old and trembly as you can 
see. 

L. S. GALYEN. 
Crawford, Colorado. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

In memory of our dear sister, Mary G. 
rhamblee, Whereas God in his wisdom and 
mercy lias seen tit to remove from our 
midst our beloved sister. She was born 
August 23, 1847. Died October 30, 1929, 
making her stay on earth eighty two 
years, two months, and seven days. Fun- 
eral services were conducted by Elder G. 
W. Bus well at the old home place near 
Zebulon. 

She professed a hope in Christ in her 
early life and went before the church at 
Sandy Grove, Nash County, North Caro- 
lina, Saturday before the fourth Sunday in 
November 18 70, and was received and 
baptized by Elder Russel Tucker, who 
was Pastor at that time. She lived a 
faithful member of the church for fifty 
nine years, and to know her was to love 
her. The writer was personally acquaint- 
ed with her. I cannot find words to ex- 
press her life. She was a good wife and 
loving mother. Being the wife of A. .1. 
Chamblee, who was born 1841, and died 
March 12, 19 IS, making his stay on earth 
seventy seven years. Brother Chamblee 
united with the church at Sandy Grove 
and was baptized by Elder G. W. Boswell, 
and lived a faithful member until his 
death. He was a good husband and lov- 
ing father. Brother and Sister Cham- 
blee's vacancies cannot be filled in our 
midst. 

To this union were born eleven children. 
Her husband and three children preceded 
her to the grave. Eight living names as 
following: W. D. Chamblee of Durham; 
Mrs. Molly Brown, Zebulon; Brother L. G. 
Chamblee, Zebulon; P. D. Chamblee, Mid- 
dlesex. P. B. Chamblee, Zebulon; Mrs. 
Respie Hilliard, Middlesex. 

Therefore, be it resolved: 1. That we 
bow in humble submission to God's will 
looking unto Jesus, the Author and Finish- 
er of our faith. Knowing the Lord was 
too good and wise to err or to make 
mistakes. 

Resolved 2nd: That a copy of these res- 
olutions be spread on our eh inch book, and 
a copy to the family, and a copy sent to 
Zion's Landmark with a request to be 
published. 

Signed by Order of Conference. 

G. W. BOSWELL. Moderator. 
J. B. MURRAY, Clerk. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



71 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remuve not the ancient Landmark 
which thy lathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Wider M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIII. No. 5 

Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSON, N. C. JAN. 15^ 1930 

PRE-DETERMINATION. 

"God that made the world and 
all things therein, seeing that He is 
Lord of heaven and earth, dwelleth 
not in temples made with hands; 
neither is he worshipped with men's 
hands, as though he needed any- 
thing, seeing he giveth to all life, 
and breath and all things; and hath 
made of one blood of all nations of 
men for to dwell on the face of the 
earth, and hath determined the 
times before appointed, and the 
bounds of their habitation; that 
they should seek the Lord, if haply 
they might feel after him, and find 
him, though he be not far from ev- 
ery one of us: For in Him we live, 
and move, and have our being; as 
certain also of your own poets have 
said, For we are also His offspring. 
—The Acts 17 Ch. 24 to 28th verses. 

The fact is so clearly set forth, in 
this and other scriptures, that we 
need not argue as to the source of 
all life.. "In Him we live, and 
move and have our being." We are 



His offspring. Born not of blood, 
nor of the will of the flesh, nor of 
the will of man, but of God." 

What concerns the writer is 
whether or not he is embraced in 
that number that is born of God, 
born from above, born of the spirit 
and, therefore, alive forever more, 
an heir of God, and joint heir with 
the Lord Jesus Christ. 

If God had to be worshipped 
with men's hands, as though He 
needed anything, we would feel our 
inability to perform that which was 
right or that which would be ac- 
ceptable in His sight. We believe 
we can witness with the apostle in 
his saying, "With the mind I serve 
the law of the Lord; but with the 
flesh the law of sin." 

It is seldom tna's we are enabled 
to say of a truth, "Not my will; but 
Thy will be done." 

If we live unto the flesh, we may 
feel to be alive without the law; but 
when the law is made manifest, sin 
is revealed in us, and we die to that 
state of self righteousness. 

We read that God hath deter- 
mined the times before appointed. 
Men may appoint, but God can dis- 
appoint us. Men may pre-deter- 
mine to do a thing; but may not 
perform. With God it is different. 
All things are ever open before His 
all seeing eyes, therefore He can do 
all the good pleasure of His will. 

Are we not glad that the inmates 
or subjects of the kingdom are not 
born of blood, to suffer and die, not 
born of the flesh to be subject anew 
to all of the imperfections of the 
flesh, not born of the will of man 
and subject to the demands or com- 
mandments of men ; but born of 
God, born of love, born from above 
and born into that state of perfec- 
tion that enables each, such blessed 



72 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



character, to live to all eternity, in 
praise to God and to Christ forever 
and forever. 

It is not the word, often, that 
causes confusion among the people 
of God; but the misuse or abuse of 
the word that brings its chain of 
contentions to no profit. 

The words predestinate and pre- 
destinated occur twice each in the 
writings of St. Paul. The word 
predestination is not found in the 
Bible and yet there has been more 
confusion and contending about 
predestination than, perhaps, any 
other subject or word. Paul was 
an eminent scholar and had no need 
to have used the words predesti- 
nate and predestinated, if the 
words, were not proper words. We 
do not believe he would have used 
them — predestinate and predesti- 
nated, if they were not the right 
words used in the right place. 

Let us examine the records for a 
correct interpretation of his mean- 
ing. Paul had in mind the eternal 
security of all the children of God, 
therefore, he said, "For whom he 
(God) did foreknow, he also did 
predestinate (them) to be conform- 
ed to the image of His Son, that He 
(the Son Jesus Christ) might be the 
first born among many brethren." 
"Moreover whom he did predesti- 
nate (to be conformed to the image 
of His Son) them he also called, and 
whom he called, them he also justi- 
fied, and whom he justified, them 
he also glorified." Rom. 8:29-30. 

It is a fact, beyond dispute, that 
in all of the writings of all the apos- 
tles and prophets, the words pre- 
destinate was used but twice, only, 
and used to show the fact beyond 



that they should be conformed to 
the image of His Son, (not that they 
should be conformed to the ways 
of the world), that they should be 
called, justified, and glorified. 
What of such predetermination on 
the part of God? Can any one ques- 
tion his right to so determine be- 
forehand? Surely not; but let us 
be content to use the word predes- 
tinate in the connection and with 
the meaning that it was used by the 
apostle. 

Paul in his epistle to the Ephes- 
ians, used the word predestinated 
only twice, and the word was used 
each time in showing the spiritual 
blessings of God toward his people. 
He was not discussing anti-Christ or 
the kingdom of darkness in this 
connection. 

Showing again the predetermina- 
tion of God or the predestination of 
God, if we must use the term, He 
said "According as He hath chosen 
us in Christ; before the foundation 
of the world, that we should be holy 
and without blame before Him in 
love ; having predestinated us unto 
the adoption of children by Jesus 
Christ, to himself, according to the 
good pleasure of His will, to the 
praise and glory of His grace, 
wherein he hath made us accepted 
in the beloved." "In whom we have 
obtained an inheritance, being pre- 
destinated, according to the pur- 
pose of Him Who worketh all things 
after the council of His own will. 
That we should be to the praise of 
His glory who first trusted in 
Christ."— Eph. 1:5-11. 

We have no right to use the 
words of Paul or of any other in- 
spired writer, save in the same con- 
nection or in conformity to the 
same meaning, in which meaning it 
was used by the writer. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



73 



If the ministry will use the words, 
as the apostle used them, to show 
that God pre-determined the salva- 
tion, preservation, resurrection and 
final glorification of the Church of 
God, no well read man or woman 
who believes the scriptures should 
object to the same. 

If, on the other hand men try to 
so interpret the words of the apos- 
tle, the only Bible character to use 
them, as to make it cover and pre- 
determine all the wicked acts of 
men, he is not fair to the apostle 
nor to the scriptures, for we read, 
"Be not deceived; God is not mock- 
ed ; for whatsoever a man soweth, 
that shall he also reap, For he that 
soweth to the flesh shall of the 
flesh reap corruption; but he that 
soweth to the spirit shall of the 
spirit reap life everlasting." — Gala- 
tions 6:7-8. 

John in his first epistle general 
said, This then is the message which 
we have heard of him, and declare 
unto you, that God is light, and in 
him is no darkness at all. "If we say 
that we have fellowship with Him, 
and walk in darkness, we lie and do 
not the truth ; but if we walk in the 
light, we have fellowship one with 
another, and the blood of Christ his 
Son cleanseth us from all sin." 

May God give us an understand- 
ing and may we be found earnestly 
contending for the truth, the whole 
truth and nothing but the truth, as 
it is in Christ Jesus. 

In hope, 

0. J. DENNY. 



EARNESTLY CONTENDING FOR 
THE FAITH. 

It has been my privilege to speak 
in a Primitive Baptist Chapel in 
eighteen states and be in the bounds 
of forty-three of their Associations. 



I am fully persuaded, from what I 
have seen and heard proclaimed by 
the servants of God, that these peo- 
ple, from the Pacific to the Atlantic 
Ocean and from the Great Lakes to 
the Gulf of Mexico, are today in ac- 
cord with the Apostolic Church in 
doctrine and order; and while along 
the way there have been some inno- 
vations, which had to be lopped off, 
these people are earnestly contend- 
ing for the principles delivered to 
their fathers by the Head of the 
Church, some nineteen hundred 
years ago, without adding an aux- 
iliary, and the true church will 
never add one, it matters not how 
long this world shall continue. 
When you have a heart to heart talk 
with a Primitive Baptist this world 
over, who has been truly taught of 
God you will find a oneness in 
spirit, with no uncertain sound ; but 
from the use of certain expressions 
in different parts of the country 
there might seem to be a difference. 
Who is there among them that 
would want to make a brother an 
offender for a word? The Apostles 
often used different expressions to 
set forth the same blessed truth, yet 
a superficial thinker might construe 
their language to be contradictory, 
especially if such a one should be 
swayed by a leader, who cared 
more for his own glory than he did 
for Christ or the church. There 
were a few such characters in apos- 
tolic days, though Paul condemned 
such a spirit, when some were clam- 
oring for Paul, some for A polios, 
and some for Cephas, as if these 
men of God were not in accord. 
When Paul affirmed that Abraham 
was justified by faith, and James 
that he was justified by works, let 
no cne think for one moment that 
Paul and James did not believe 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



alike. Paul was speaking of justi- 
fication before God; and James of 
justification before man. All saints 
believe as experience and the scrip- 
tures teach, that salvation is of the 
Lord; and, in keeping the com- 
mandments of the Lord there is 
great reward, and in walking in his 
statues there is rejoicing of heart. 
One brother may dwell and stres 
the gladness of heart in the obed- 
ience of faith and in the work of 
love ; and say as did Paul to the 
church at Rome, "I beseech you 
therefore, brethren, (not from the 
exertion of man or from the crea- 
ture will, but) by the mercies of 
God, that ye present your bodies a 
living sacrifice, holy, acceptably 
unto God, which is your reasonable 
service," thus dwelling upon the 
effects of God's grace ; and another 
servant may dwell upon the cause 
of right living, the grace of God; 
and each well knows that without 
the Lord he can do nothing in spirit- 
ual service; as it is God that work- 
eth at the time of service, not work- 
ed at some previous time, both to 
will and to do. 

I sometimes wonder if there are 
as much love, meekness and little- 
ness among all who claim the name 
of Primitive Baptists as the Holy 
Spirit teaches, would there be so 
many taunts, reflections and mis- 
representations of God's anointed 
in our ranks? So many are ready 
to condemn others for using expres- 
sions not found in the Bible, when 
they do the same things. Some 
years ago an elder living in Ten- 
nessee wrote me that he was im- 
pressed to visit the churches of 
South Florida, and asked me if I 
could arrange appiontments for 
him: and then added that a preach- 
er in Georgia had told him thai I 



was an avowed absolute!*. He said 
that he did not believe in the doc- 
trine of the absolute predestination 
of all things, good, bad and indif- 
ferent, for such were not scriptural 
expressions, and that God's servants 
should not use such terms. Fur- 
ther on in his letter he said, "I hold 
and believe in the sovereignty of 
God over all words, beings and 
things." While the preacher did 
not say anything in his letter about 
two salvations, one wrought by God 
and one wrought by the believer, 
yet I knew he advocated such a 
theory. I am not conscious that I 
ever used the expression "absolute 
predestination of all things" or "two 
salvations" in preaching the doc- 
trine of the Bible, and I do not think 
I would have to do so in order to be 
a sound Primitive Baptist. I do not 
know of a Primitive Baptist preach- 
er in the Association of which I am 
a member that uses either of these 
unscriptural expressions. While I 
never told the Elder that he could 
find "absolute predestination of all 
things" in the same chapter that he 
could find the "sovereignty of God 
over all worlds, beings and things," 
but I wrote him if he was willing to 
speak as the oracles of God, and 
leave off human made expressions, I 
would make appointments for him. 
He promised, and if he ever made 
any while among our churches I 
did not hear of it. 

When Peter said, "If any man 
speak, let him speak as the oracles 
of God," he may not have meant 
that we should clothe our language 
in the same words, but I do believe 
if brethren would cease to use ex- 
pressions contrary to their meaning, 
there would not be so many infer- 
ences drawn, and we would under- 
stand each other better. I have 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



75 



never felt like declaring non-fellow- 
ship for a brother because he does 
not use Bible language, if I believe 
he knows and loves the truth ; but I 
am led to believe that the inspired 
servants were directed of God to 
use proper words, and sound 
speech. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



REPENTANCE. 

There is much said in the world 
and also in the Bible about repent- 
ance. In the world it is believed 
and taught that men can repent at 
will and of themselves and so they 
are urged to do so. The Bible no- 
where exhorts men to repent. It 
declares it of great importance. 
Jesus said "Except ye repent ye 
shall all likewise perish." Luke 
13:3. Men have sinned and done 
things contrary to God's laws and 
God's ways, and he must repent of 
it all or he cannot be saved. But 
so many things that men do that 
are wrong in God's sight, are right 
in their own sight. "There is a 
way which seemeth right unto a 
man, but the end therof are the 
ways of death." Prov. 14:12. How 
can a man get sorry for, and turn 
away from a thing that seems right 
to him? Men attain to and boast 
Of their righteousness, but those 
taught of God find that all their 
righteousness is as filthy rags. Paul 
prayed to be clothed, not with his 
own righteousness, but with the 
righteousness which is of God by 
faith. Phil. 3:9. There is great 
necessity, but how is the natural 
man to repent. Paul said, "I verily 
thought with myself that I ought to 
do many things contrary to the 
name of Jesus of Nazareth." Acts 
2G:9. So we see that it is true as 
Jesus said, a man must be born 



again. Man is in himself helpless, 
but the Lord has laid help upon one 
who is mighty to save, even to the 
uttermost them that come to God 
by him. Heb. 7:25. Now in this 
gospel day repentance and faith 
are to be preached, but how? Read 
Luke 24:47. "And that repentance 
and remission of sins should be 
preached in his name among all 
nations, beginning at Jerusalem. 

Notice repentance is to be 
preached in Jesus name, if it be 
asked why, read Acts 5:31. "Him 
hath God exalted with his right 
hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, 
for to give repentance to Israel, and 
forgiveness of sins. 

Now we see that repentance like 
the pardon of sins is the gift of 
Jesus Christ. Then when one is 
truly sorry for his sins, sees how ex- 
ceeding sinful sin is, hates sin, and 
abhors himself and repents in dust 
and ashes, as did Job, his sorrow is 
Godly sorrow, and is the gift of God 
and he like the Publican, in the tem- 
ple cries, God be merciful to me a 
sinner. The Lord has begun this 
work, and it is a good work. It 
brings the sinner within the range 
of God's mercy, and he that has 
begun a good work in the sinner 
will perform it unto the day of Jesus 
Christ. Then when we preach re- 
pentance to sinners, should we not 
tell them that repentance is the gift 
of Jesus Christ, who came into the 
world to save sinners, and that re- 
pentance is one of the graces by 
which he saves? "By grace are ye 
saved, through faith; and that not 
of yourselves; it (faith) is the gift 
of God; not of works, lest any man 
should boast." Ephesians 2:8-9. Let 
us read the 10th verse also. "For we 
are his workmanship, created in 
Jesus unto good works, which God 



76 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



hath before ordained that we should 
walk in them." It takes an espe- 
cial work to make a saint of a sin- 
ner, and it is certain according to 
the Bible, that this work can be 
done alone by the Lord. We are 
his workmanship," and it is Christ 
Jesus. God does not deal merci- 
fully with a sinner outside of Jesus 
Christ. He is the mediator between 
God and man, the man Christ Jesus. 
Notice it is the man Christ Jesus. It 
is man that the Father would have 
saved. So the Word (his Son) was 
made flesh. He took not on him 
the nature of angels, but the seed 
of Abraham. He is the seed of 
Abraham to whom the promise was 
made. (Paul to the Galatians) And 
he is clothed with all the fulness of 
God and so declares that "All that 
the Father giveth me shall come to 
me, and him that cometh to me I 
will in no wise cast out." Is it not 
a pleasure to tell poor sinners (and 
poor sinners are those who have no 
righteousness to plead) that Jesus 
is both willing and able to save 
them. To believe in the power of 
Jesus to cure must have inspired 
the Leper with some hope, else he 
would not have fallen at his feet 
saying, "Lord if thou wilt thou 
canst make me clean." Jesus was 
willing for he said, "I will. Be thou 
clean," and Jesus has been and is 
always willing to save the poor 
destitute one that comes to him, for 
those who come are those whom 
the Father draws. For he said, 
"No man can come to me, except 
the Father which hath sent me 
draw him; and I will raise him up 
at the last day." John 6:44. Jesus 
prepares those chosen by the Fath- 
er to Salvation and then he assures 
them that he will come again at the 
last day and gather his ransomed 



ones from the four corners of the 
earth. Yes from their graves and 
fashion their vile bodies like unto 
his own glorious body, and take 
them home to glory. Then the 
Father's purpose that sinners should 
be conformed to the image of his 
Son, will have been fulfilled, and so 
the saints shall ever be with the 
Lord, shouting to Jesus, "Thou art 
worthy for thou hast redeemed us 
by thy blood out of every nation, 
kindred, tongue, and people. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



MRS. TINA JOHNSON PROCTOR 

It was in the year of nineteen twenty nine, 
The twenty-fourth day of November, 

The saddest day of our life 

That we can recall or remember. 

The sadness was the calling 

01 our dear wife, mother and child 

Who so softly answered 

And returned home with a smile. 

Tina you were so good 

We learned it by your prayer; 

But Jesus knew you were his 
And took you in his care. 

Dear one, our home is broken 

You were the sunshine of our life. 

We will remember you dear 

As the dearest mother and wife. 

We parents are broken hearted, 
We pray our life will be anew, 

And meet with you dear child 

Where there will be no sad adieu. 

Now you are in heaven's bliss 
No more our hearts to cheer, 

There joined with the angels 
Our sister who was so dear. 

Twenty-five years you were here 

But Jesus said "Come home above." 

Now there are three little children, 
To live without a mother's love. 

Five months of confinement. 

You patiently lay in bed 
But now your lips are cold and pale 

And not a word of complaint you ever 
said. 

But when you were called 
And left your sweet name 

Without a blemish, scratch or stain. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



77 



One consolation is that you're not dear 

But only none before, 
For life is God and God is life 

in Him we live forevermore. 

On that lonely hill-side 

They laid my dear wife to rest, 
Tho' my heart was void and aching 

I remembered "God knows best." 

Thy will be done, oh Lord; 

Thy will be done, not mine 
And cannot we repeat this vow 

"Not our will, O Lord, but thine." 

Now you are in heaven's repose, 
Though we did all in our power; 

We remember your tender hand 
Now it holds a sacred flower. 

Now we have a little flower, 

So often we look at this 
And think of you, dear one, 

And there we place a sweet kiss. 

Some bright day we will meet you 

Up above the azure skies; 
There we will remain 

Where loved ones never die. 

— Written by a loved one. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Mrs. Sarah Crews Robertson was born 
March 30th., 1862, departed this life De- 
cember 12th., 1929. 

She was the daughter of Alexander and 
Saluda Watson Crews who lived in the 
! same house where she lived at the time of 
her death. 

On October 21st., 18 77 she was married 
! to William M. Robertson who survives 
her. To this union were born, eleven 
children, two of them having preceded her 
to the grave, they being John H. Robert- 
son and Mrs. Anna B. Robertson Smith. 

The surviving children are Mrs. J. A. 
Dillon, Mrs. C. V. Watkins, of Winston- 
Salem, N. C, also Walter C. Robertson of 
the same address. Mrs C. W. Laslev and 
Mrs. C. M. Weavil of Kernersville, N. C, 
Will A. and Grover Robertson of Walker- 
town. N. C. and Mrs. R. E. (RobersoiO 
Nelson and Miss Alice Robertson of the 
borne place near Winston-Salem. Also 
thirty six grandchildren survive, with 
three great grand-children and a host of 
other relatives and friends are left to 
mourn her departure, among them one 
hrother Allen Crews of Walkertown and 
Mrs. Peter Westmoreland of Oak Ridge. 
N. C, sister of the deceased. 

She was baptised about thirteen years 
aco into the fellowship of Saints Delight 
Primitive Baptist Church and remained a 
faithful member until death. 

She was in declining health for some 
time before her death; but attended her 
church services when she could do so, and 
her greatest pleasure seemed to be in ser- 



vice to fehe Lord. She bore her afflic- 
tions patiently and passed away singing 
praises to her Lord. 



Bereft ones, give Jesus praise, 

Though your mother is gone, 
Jesus blessed her all her days, 

And gently called her home. 

Though you can, but mourn her loss 

She is now at rest. 
Her eternal gain is your cross, 

But she is forever blessed. 

God worketh all-things well, 
A few days on earth doth give, 

'Twas life to close her eyes in death; 
Like Jesus, she died to live. 

The Lord is just and but takes, 

The life that he hath given, 
He gives grace to die, and makes 

Us rich forever, with Him, in Heaven. 

The writer was asked to speak at her 
funeral and the large number of people 
present was evidence of the general esteem 
in which she was held by her church and 
neighbors. 

By request of the family, 

O. J. DENNY. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas the Lord, in His wisdom has 
seen fit to remove, by death, our highly 
esteemed sister, Talley Neal, from our 
midst, we feel to say, that she has ceased 
from her labors and her works do follow 
her. 

She loved her church, and was always 
ready to bear her part of any expense of 
the church. 

We look around and see the trees that 
she planted with her own hands at our 
little church, and also at the Walnut Cove 
High School. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

1st. That we bow in humble submission 
to the God of all grace in the loss of this 
highly esteemed sister. 

2nd. That a copy of these resolutions 
be spread upon the minutes of our church 
book, and that a copy be sent to Zion's 
Landmark, and to the Advocate and Mes- 
senger for publication. 

Done by order of the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Walnut Cove, N. C, on Satur- 
day, before the 3rd Sunday in Nov. 1929. 

Elder J. A. Fagg, Mod. 
Lon H. Murphy, Clerk. 



MR. SHERWOOD L. MULLIS 

By request of his daughter, Mrs. Rilla 
Ann Brooks, I write the obituary notice of 
my dear friend, Mr. Sherwood L. Mullis. 

"The silver cord is loosed, the golden 
bowl is broken" and the spirit of our dear 
friend, "Has returned to the God who gave 
it." 



78 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



How quiet and peaceful was his passing. 
The summons came about 3:00 p. m., on 
Oct. :3rd., 1029. Uncle Sherwood, as he 
was familiarly known, was born July 23rd. 
1837. Among the foothills of Polk moun- 
tain on Richardson Creek. Uncle Sher- 
wood was a son of the late Mr. Holden 
Mullis and Mrs. Lucretia Adams Mullis, 
who were among the best known and lead- 
ing families of their time. In 1839 when 
Sherwood was only two years old, his 
father died, leaving his wife with several 
small children to care for and support, 
and young Sherwood grew up an obedient, 
faithful son. Called a "mother-body" by 
his companions from his devotion to his 
widowed mother. Yet -with all these han- 
dicaps, Mr. Mullis fought life's battles 
bravely and by hard work, economy and 
frugal living, became one of our most well- 
On September 17th, 1856, he was hap- 
pily married to Miss Sylvania Williams. 
To this union ten children were born, six 
of whom are now living. The sons are 
Messrs. Elisha Mullis of Marshville town- 
ship, Sylvester and J. Marcus of New 
Salem and Jarvis Mullis of Goose Creek. 
The (laughters are Mrs. Sarah Helms of 
Marshville, Mrs. Rilla Ann Brooks of 
New Salem, Mrs. Mary Jane Hargette, one 
of his daughters, died July the 31st, 1929. 

His first wife died Aug. 19, 1918. His 
second marriage was to Mrs. Ellen Simp- 
'dii Austin, who is still living. 

During the war he served in Company 
A 18th Regiment in Lee's army. At the 
battle of Bristol Station, Va., he was cap- 
tured and remained a prisoner for sixteen 
months and twelve days, spending most 
of the time at the prison at Point Lookout, 
Md. 

After the war was over he returned 
home and began farming again, settling 
on a farm near Watson Church, in which 
community he spent the rest of his useful 
lite. He has been a successful farmer and 
business man, a good citizen and neigh- 
bor, but the crowning glory of his life is 
his fine record as a Christian gentleman 
and a devout and faithful member of his 
church. 

Fifty nine years ago he professed a hope 
in Christ and joined the Watson Primi- 
tive Baptist church. This church holds its 
annual communion and foot-washing ser- 
vice on the fourth Sunday in May of each 
year. Oh! how it makes the writer's 
hearl to rejoice to say that he attended 
every communion service for fifty nine 
years. He had been clerk of the church 
58 years. Funeral services were held at 
Watson by Elder Oscar Mullis and inter- 
ment was in the Williams Cemetery. Un- 
cle Sherwood was a strong believer in the 
Bible, content with the simple teachings 
of God's word and loved the good old-time 
religion. The writer has had several 
pleasant conversations with him. though 
lie was many years my senior. 



In conclusion I will say: He has fought 
a good fight, he has finished his course, 
and he kept the faith: Henceforth there 
is laid up for him a crown fit righteous- 
ness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, 
shall give him at that day; and not to 
him only, but unto all them that love his 
appearing. 

At the great and final judgment, when 
the Lord in all His glory we shall see. 

At the bidding of our Saviour, "Come, 
ye blessed, to my right." Then to meet 
with our loved ones. What a gathering 
of the faithful that will be. 

If was sad for his children to give up 
their dear old father. They were good 
and kind to him. 

Dear children don't be weeping. 

Bear father is sleeping; 

We'll see him here no more, 

But hope to meet him on the happy shove. 

Written by, 

Mrs. Addie Baucum Brooks. 



EMILY J. EDWARDS HARDEE 

Blessed are the dead that die in the 
Lord. For they rest from their labors 
and their works do follow them. 

This dear sister in Christ, and loving 
cousin, passed away the 1st of January. 
1929. Her funeral was preached by Eld. 
Luther Joyner in Red Banks church. Then 
her remains were taken to the family 
burial ground, and buried beside her de- 
voted companion, that preceded her to the 
grave several years ago. 

She had been in feeble health for quite 
awhile. But had a stroke so she lost most 
all activity, couldn't walk alone nor feed 
herself. She was living with her young- 
est brother, John S. Edwards, on their 
farm near Pactolus, N. C. They were de- 
voted to each other. Besides her lonely 
brother, she left several nieces, nephews 
and a host of kind, loving friends. They 
all cared for her tenderly and helped her 
over the trying ordeals of life. May God 
continue to bless and comfort them all. 
It is my heart's desire to live as upright 
as she did. Her Christian walk was wor- 
thy to be followed. She was born and 
reared in Pitt County, N ,C, 6 miles be- 
low Greenville, N. C. 

She was the daughter of James Martin 
and Elizabeth Edwards. She was mar- 
ried to George Washington Hardee on 
March the 17, 1869. She was a faithful 
wife till his death, patiently endured her 
trials and afflictions. Her parents and 
four brothers all preceded her to the 
grave. James A., Joseph B., L. N., one 
died in infancy, Vinyard Bond. 

The Lord giveth and taketh away, bless- 
ed be His Holy name forever, and bless 
and comfort the entire bereaved family, is 
my sincere desire, for they were loving 
and faithful to her in sickness and in 
health. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



79 



She joined the church at Red Banks, 
Aug. the L3th, 1929, was a consistent 
member till death. She dreamed of cast- 
ing bread upon the waters, and she was a 
comfort in trouble, and a help in time of 
need to suffering humanity. 

A precious one from Earth is gone, 
A voice we loved is still, 
A place is vacant in this world, 
That never can be filled. 

She was highly esteemed and loved by 
many beside her immediate family. She 
was devoted to the Church, the members, 
the cause of Christ and His Kingdom. 

I feel and believe her soul is sweetly 
resting in peace with her blessed Saviour. 
I loved her dearly. She asked me to 
write her obituary, though the most un- 
worthy of all I feel to be. 

Written by her loving cousin, 

Mrs. Melissa Brooks Tyson. 



MARISA LANG 

Marisa Lang was born December 25th., 
1846 and departed this life February 
24th., 19 29, making her stay on earth 83 
fears, one month and 29 days. She was 
married to Johnathan Lang and to this 
union were born seven children, three 
boys and four girls. Her husband and 
four children preceded her to the grave. 
Three daughters, a number of grandchil- 
dren and a host of friends mourn their 
loss. 

Sister Lang united with the church at 
Hancock's in early life and was a faithful 
and true member until death. It was the 
writer's great pleasure to visit the home 
of this dear sainted woman and converse 
with her on religious subjects. Her faith 
in God was strong, resting assured that 
whatsoever God had promised He was able 
to do. 

The church has lost one of its oldest 
and highly esteemed members, but God in 
feis wisdom saw fit to call her from the 
shores of time into the great beyond to en- 
joy the sweet blessings that are promised 
i:> them that obey him. 

To the bereaved family we extend our 
deepest sympathy and would say. weep 
not for her. for she is reaping her reward 
with Christ and the holy angels basking 
in the sunshine of God's love awaiting the 
resurrection. 

P,° it resolved: 

(1) That the church at Hancocks does 
bow in humble submission to our blessed 
God. who doeth all things after the coun- 
cil of his own will. 

(2) That we extend our christian sym- 
pathy to the bereaved family and all that 
are near and dear to her that they may 
be enabled by Jesus to put their whole 
trust in God, who is the author and fin- 
isher of our faith. 

(3) That a copy of these resolutions be 
placed on the church minutes, a copy sent 



to Hie bereaved family and a copy to 
Ziou's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of the church while in 
conference on the third Saturday in June. 
1929. 

Elder W. M. Monsees, Moderator 
B. A. Highsmith, Clerk. 
Written by request of the church by 
E. C. CLIFTON. 



EMELINE MANESS. 

In sad and loving remembrance of our 
dear mother, Emeline J. Maness, born 
Dec. 10, 1873 and departed this life, Oct. 
30, 19 29, making her stay on earth 5 5 
years, 10 months, 11 days. 

She was the daughter of the late J. C. 
and Mary Cornelison. She was married 
to T. W. Maness April 9, 1893. Unto this 
union were born thirteen children, one 
dying in infancy. Twelve survive, 
six boys and six girls, two brothers and 

Mother had been in failing health for 
several years and spent some time in the 
hospital. After her return home in Sept. 
she was confined to bed for awhile but 
seemed to be getting better, and was able 
to attend preaching at Suggs Creek, the 
second Saturday and Sunday in October, 
which she seemed to enjoy so much, as 
one of her sisters was baptised on Sunday. 

She united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Sugg's Creek in the year of 
19 09 where she was a most devoted and 
faithful member, and attended church 
regularly. 

All through her suffering she main- 
tained a wonderful patience and courage, 
for her faith in God was beautiful. 

Her funeral service was conducted by 
her pastor, Elder H. S. Williams, who 
preached a worthy sermon expressing 
many times her devotion and good will to- 
wards all. She was laid to rest in the 
cemetery at Suggs Creek Church near her 
home to await the resurrection. 

Her presence is geratly missed by her 
bereaved husband and children, as well as 
by her many friends and all who knew 
her. She was a source of sunshine and 
comfort, and always had a smile for ev- 
eryone. We loved her so much, but gave 
her up with the consoling thought that 
she passed to the great beyond, awaiting 
the peace and glory in her heavenly home. 
She bore her suffering with much patience 
always saying it was the mercy of the 
Lord. She died without a struggle, as if 
she was falling asleep. It seemed every- 
one loved her and always looked for her 
sweet smile. But we feel our loss is her 
eternal gain. 

Mother, your dear face is hidden, 
And your loving voice is stilled 
A place is vacant in our home, 
Which never can be filled, 
God grant that we may meet you 



80 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ng shore. 

Iwell and sing God's praise 
s no more. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas God was pleased to call our be- 
loved halt'time Pastor, Elder C. A. Davis, 
to go and be with the silent others in 
death on the 30th day of September, 19 29, 
and whereas Elder Davis was a man of 
great worth to the Primitive Baptist 
Church, a man slow to speak, and slow to 
wrath, and that we would do well to walk 
after his example. 

We wish to quote a few remarks that 
he made in our Church the last time he 
met with us: "I want to come here as long 
as 1 am able, whether I can preach or not. 
I love you and want to meet with you as 
long as I can." We miss Elder Davis' 
kind words of admonition and love. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

1st. That our loss is his eternal gain; 
he fought a good fight, and was resigned 
to the will of God whom he so faithfully 
served. 

2nd. That we bow in humble submis- 
sion to God, the giver of every good and 
perfect gift, and be resigned to his will. 

3rd. That his family has lost a good 
husband and father; his neighbors, a good 
neighbor; and the Church a good member 
and an humble Minister. 

4th. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to his family, and to the Land- 
mark and Lone Pilgrim, and be recorded 
in our Church Book. 

Done by order of the Church in Confer- 
ence on Saturday before the first Sunday 
in November, 19 29. 

D. P. BROADWAY, Mod. 
C. B. OWEN, Clerk. 



RI FFS SIMMONS 

Please publish in the Landmark the 
death of my brother Rufus Simmons. He 
was born May 4, 1857, died September 10, 
19 29, making his stay on earth 78 years, 
4 months and 6 days. He joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church in 19 24, and was 
a faithful member, always filling his seat 
at church if possible. He was baptised by 

J Ho died very suddenly. He often spoke 
about dying and said he hoped when his 
days on earth were ended, he would pass 
away quickly, and so he did. He was so 
peaceable and quiet and kind. We all 
miss him so much. 
Written by his sister, 

REBECCA GARNER, 

Newport, N. C. 



Mary Adams, 

Resolved, First, That the church at Red 
Hanks has lost a precious sister, that our 
loss is her eternal gain. 

Second, Whereas, it pleased the Al- 
mighty God to gather all such jewels home 
that we humbly pray in our sinful hearts 
that we may be carried home to meet her 
where all is bliss, where we will be clone 
with suffering and sorrow. 

By order of the church in conference, 
Saturday before the 2nd Sunday in Septem- 
ber, 1929. 

Elder Luther Joyner, Mod. 
Mrs. Zeb R. Cay, Clerk. 
Farmville, N. C. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas the all-wise heavenly Father 
has seen fit to remove from our midst by 
death our much beloved sister, Lydia 
Honeycutt, be it resolved: 

Sister Honeycutt was born May 7, 1862 
and died May 29, 1929, making her stay 
on earth 6 7 years, 21 days. She joined 
the church in April 1903, and was bap- 
tized by her beloved pastor, Elder J. H. 
Johnson. Therefore be it resolved, first 
that we the church at Sandy Grove bow 
in humble submission to our blessed God, 
who doeth all things according to his own 
will. 

Second, That we extend our Christian 
sympathy to the bereaved family, whereas 
the church has lost a faithful member, one 
worthy of our love and respect. 

Further resolved that we submit a copy 
of these resolutions to the family, enter 
a copy on our church record, and send a 
copy to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of church in Conference 
Saturday, October 19, 1929. 

ELDER L. H. STEPHENSON, Mod. 
ALEX DUPREE, Committee, 
S. L. OGRURN, Committee. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, it hath seemed good to our 
Heavenly Father to remove from our midst 
■in June 19th, 1929, our dear sister, Miss 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas God in his infinite wisdom and 
mercy has seen fit to remove from our 
midst by death our beloved sister in the 
Lord. Harriet E. Whitfield. She was call- 
ed to her eternal home Aug. 12, 1929, 
lacking only a few days of being eighty 
seven years old. She was a faithful and 
consistent member to her church, always 
filling her seat unless providentially hin- 
dered. We shall miss her cheerful face. 

Therefore be it resolved. 

That we bow in humble submission to 
the will of our heavenly father, who dooth 
all things well. We feel that our los-< is 
her eternal gain, for precious in the sight 
of God is the death oi bis saints. 

Also further that we send a copy of 
these resolutions to iZon's Landmark for 
publication, and a copy be spread on our 
church records. 

ELDER B. S. COWIN Mod. 
R. A. BATLEY. Clerk. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

— - — AT - 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLDSCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL, XLIH FEBRUARY 1, 1930 No. 6 



JEREBOAM IS PUNISHED FOR HIS WICKEDNESS 



And behold there came a man out of Judah by the word of the Lord 
unto Bethel; and Jereboam stood by the altar to burn incense. And he 
cried against the altar and the word of the Lord: Behold a child shall be 
born to the house of David, Josiah by name; and upon thee shall he offer 
the priests of the high places that burn incense upon thee, and men's 
bones shall be burnt there. 

And he gave a sign the same day saying, this is the sign which the 
Lord hath spoken, behold the altar shall be rent, and the ashes that are 
upon it shall be poured out. 

And it came to pass, when King Jereboam heard the saying of the man 
of God, which had cried out against the altar in Bethel, that he put forth 
his hand from the altar, saying lay hold on him. And his hand which he 
put forth against him dried up, so that he could not pull it in again to him. 

The altar also was rent, and the ashes poured out from the altar ac- 
cording to the signs which the man of God had given by the word of the 
Lord. 

And the king answered and said unto the man of God, Entreat now the 
face of the Lord thy God, and pray for me that my hand may be restored 
me again. Then the man of God besought the Lord, and the king's hand 
was restored him again and became as it was before." — 1 Kings 13:1-5. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor - - - Winston, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT .... Dade City ,[Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE - - - Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of ZiorTs 
Landmark 



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regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

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Zton's landmark 

©evotefc to the Cause of 3esus Christ 



A WANDERING SOUL. 

Come tell me pilgrim is it far? 
To that fair land, where angels are? 
It's not so far as you would think, 
You are very near towards the 
brink. 

Come tell me pilgrim is Jesus there 
Sitting on His throne so fair? 
Yes, Jesus is there upon His throne, 
Waiting to call poor pilgrims home. 

Come tell me pilgrim are the saints 
all there 

in the temple with Christ around 

His chair? 
Yes they are all there in that fair 

land, 

Their names are written in the palm 
of His hand. 

Come tell me pilgrim can it be true, 
That Jesus loves both me and you? 
Can we hope to ever be with Him 
there 

In that bright land so pure and 
fair? 

Yes we can hope and in faith be 
strong, 

To reach that land beyond the 
storms, 

If Jesus will give us the hope 

through faith, 
That's the anchor that holds us in 

His grace. 

MRS. NETTIE ELLIS, 
132 Pollock St., New Bern, N. C. 



LM PRESSED TO WRITE FOR 
LANDMARK. 

I don't know why it is that I have 
been so much impressed of late to 
write for the Landmark so much 
but then I hope it is a good impres- 
sion and for a good purpose I know 
not what. I have been impressed 
with prayer and what it meant more 
than anything else. I feel some- 
times that perhaps the reason for 
this is because I am one that needs 
it so much. For I have been strip- 
ped of all self-righteousness and 
brought down to see just what lam 
and to know something of the 
power of my God. I know that I 
can not think a good thought nor 
do a good deed without the pres- 
ence of my Lord to direct me. When 
I would do good, evil is present 
with me. Satan has and will con- 
tinue to try to tempt the very elect, 
(the church' of God) but I am so 
glad that satan can't go beyond his 
bounds. 

In preaching fourth Saturday, 
Brother Pridgen mentioned some- 
thing about what people we (the 
old Baptists) ought to be, and that 
is something worth considering. For 
they are the most blest people on 
earth, for they are trusting in a God 
ihat has power to save sinners. Not 
in any good that they have done, 
for they have been tried out, and 
have learned by experience that if 
saved at all it is through the grace 
of God. Therefore as people of 
the living God we should press for- 
ward in all duty, live soberly and 



82 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



righteously and godly in this pres- 
ent evil world. We are command- 
ed some place in the scriptures to, 
"Abstain from the very appearance 
of e.vil; leave off worldly lust and 
vain glory;" "study to shew thyself 
approved unto God, a workman 
that needeth not to be ashamed." 
Another, "Let your light so shine 
that men may see your good works 
and honor your Father which is in 
heaven." 

Speaking of prayer, there are two 
Innds of prayer — one of them is 
'-en we iust merely utter words 
ol prayer as a habit or form, with- 
out ever feeling the need of it or 
maybe ev, n have our mind on what 
we are saying, but when a person 
gets so burdened with trouble and 
impressed to pray for something 
and prays wherever he may be or 
whatever hour it may be if he is 
blessed with that spirit from above. 
This is real prayer and the Lord 
gives it and then answers it at the 
right time. I well remember when 
I felt like I ought to say my prayer 
every night before I went to sleep 
and did try to pray and maybe was 
thinking of something else at the 
same time. And I well remember 
the first two real prayers I ever 
made in my life and they were an- 
swered. I was small too, and mama 
was taken real sick and I thought 
she was going to die. I had no 
hopes of her, and the first thing I 
thought of was to pray, so I went 
in the back room to myself and fell 
down on my knees for the first time 
I ever remember and prayed to my 
God to save her. And it is strange 
to say that my experience about 
going to the church is just as it was, 
but "God moves in a mysterious 
way." It is very mysterious and 
wonderful too. It pleased the Lord 



to show me I was a sinner in my 
early childhood and I wanted to do 
better and tried to live right. In 
other words to keep the law, but 
that failed. I tried to pray but it 
doesn't seem to me that it was ear- 
nest prayer. I didn't know how to 
pray and what to pray for. I had 
a desire deep down in my heart to 
be what I thought the old Baptists 
were and I loved to go and hear 
them preach and still I didn't un- 
derstand anything they said, 
couldn't get a particle of under- 
standing out of the scriptures. Still 
I was burdened with sin and join- 
ing the church. The impression 
grew so strong that I wanted relief 
and for the second time in my life 
that I can say that I fell down on 
my knees in earnest prayer was to 
ask the Lord to make me willing to 
go to the church if it was my duty. 
The next morning when I arose I 
was a changed person. I was 
different from what I had ever 
been before and my whole soul was 
on baptism. That was the one 
thing I wanted most and I wen' 
forth at the water and was received 
and relieved for awhile of all bur- 
dens, but I didn't go far before 
Satan was trying me on every hand 
and he does that till yet, but if I am 
one of His I have no need to fear 
Satan beyond this life because the 
scriptures say that my Father is 
greater than them all and none is 
able to pluck them out of His 
hands. Well I have written this in 
a hurry and there are many mis- 
takes I know, but hope the editor 
may correct them and publish it if 
there is anything in this letter thai 
will comfort a child of God. If not 
just throw aside. 

With love, 
ANNIE HOOKS. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



EXPERIENCE. 

Dear Brother Rowe : 

If I only felt worthy to call you 
such. I know you will be sur- 
prised to hear from me. 

I hope you haven't forgotten Sis- 
ter Bailey taking you to see me. I 
do appreciate your coming to see 
me so much. I don't feel like I will 
ever be wed any more, but I am 
reconciled to the Lord's will. I can 
be up some now. 

I want to tell you a part of what 
I have been through with. 

As far back as I can remember 
I felt so mean I felt like I would 
die and the bad man would get me. 
I would get on my knees and try to 
pray, and I would tell my younger 
sister if she didn't pray the bad man 
would get her. I was so afraid of 
death. 

After I could read I would get 
the Landmark and read it, but 
would let no one see me. 

My father and mother were not 
members of any church, but were 
strong in the Primitive Baptist be- 
lief. My mother's sister (Aunt 
Maggie) who lived with us was a 
member. So we entertained most 
of the brethren you spoke of, and 
many more, I won't mention. 

I would sit up and listen to them 
talk. And when they would sing 
an I have prayer I would get on my 
knees with them. I did enjoy it so 
much. 

When I was about sixteen I 
dreamed of climbing a golden lad- 
der, and my Saviour was at the top. 
He had a golden crown on His 
head, but I didn't reach the top. In 
a few nights after that I went to a 
dance to be in the young crowd. 
When I went to bed that night I 
couldn't sleep, for the blackest 
man with the reddest eyes I ever 



saw dragged me up and down some 
old steps all night. 

When I got up the next morning 
i I il 1 mother and Aunt Maggie I 
("id believe it was a sin for me to 
da ice. I told Ihem I never expect- 
ed to dance any more, and I never 
did. 

My m-ilher was taken very sick, 
v:o ci n't think she could live. I 
would, go off and try to pray the 
best I could to the Lord to spare 
me my mother. I felt like I couldn't 
give her up, she was such a good 
mother. 

She got well that time. In about 
another year she was taken sick 
again and I don't remember asking 
the Lord for her, and she died. I 
felt like I couldn't live. 

I asked Aunt Maggie why I 
didn't go to the Lord like I did be- 
fore. She said because her time 
had come, and the good Lord didn't 
put it in me to pray. 

We still had lots of company, old 
and young. I did enjoy having it, 
but felt so sinful. 

Aunt Mit Bryant asked me why 
I didn't go to the church. I didn't 
say anything to her, it made me feel 
even more sinful. 

Sometime after that I was trying 
to pray to the Lord for mercy. I 
was so afraid, and these words 
came to me, "Be not afraid, thy 
God is near." 

I can't even tell how light and 
happy I felt, but it didn't last long. 

In 1888 I married such a good 
man. He has been so faithful to 
me and the children and others as 
he was able. My troubles didn't 
leave me. 

I would go to Flat Swamp 
church and I would plan to go to 
them for a home with them, but 
something would happen to pre- 



84 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



vent, and then 1 would think I 
wasn't changed. 

I would beg the Lord to show 
me by answering my prayer. 

I had the toothache so bad one 
clay I got on my knees, and begged 
the Lord if I was changed to case 
my toothache, and in five minutes I 
was so happy for I didn't hurt one 
bit. I tried to praise the Lord. 

Sometime after that my husband 
was taken very sick. I couldn't 
sleep so I lay by him one night and 
prayed if I was changed to show it 
to me by raising my dear husband, 
nn ; lie get well. I was so happy, 
1 ufc it didn't last long. I soon felt 
as sinful as ever. 

I was begging the Lord for mercy 
day and night when awake. 

1 was at the pump when these 
words came to me, "Go and do my 
duty and they would gradually 
leave me." 

In 1910 Brother Tommy Law- 
rence was preaching here. I went 
every time I could. On the fourth 
Sunday in April at the close of the 
service I felt like I couldn't live an- 
other month, so I asked Cousin Sue 
Outterbridge if there would be 
preaching at her house that night, 
and she asked, Did you want to 
join? 

I said yes, and the church was 
called together and I was received 
with such a few words. I wasn't 
baptized until the fourth Sunday 
in May. It was such a long month 
for I felt so sinful. I felt like I had 
deceived the dear faces I loved so 
much. 

While they were singing at the 
water, I was still begging the Lord 
and these words came to me, "I 
was doing what I was commanded 
to do." 

When I came out of the water 



my husband was at the edge to take 
me. I threw my arms around bis 
neck. I was so happy. I enjoyed 
going to preaching and having the 
members to come to see me. 

The war came on, and two of my 
sons had to go to camp. I felt as 
if I couldn't stand it. I prayed so 
hard to my Lord and Saviour to 
spare me my boys, not to go over 
sea. I tried to pray for all, but 
mine came first. 

I was out in the garden ueggmj: 
the Lord, and the words came to 
me, "The whole German govern- 
ment would be overthrown before 
one of mine would have to go." The 
Armistice was signed four days be- 
fore my oldest son would have 
gone. 

I praised the Lord. I was so 
happy most of the time, but still I 
bad my doubts. 

Most three years ago, I was 
taken very sick, so I haven't been 
able to get around much since. I 
love the brethren and sisters and 
I am better satisfied. 

All who will please pray for me. 

I hope to hear you preach some- 
time. I have heard you and enjoy- 
ed it so much. I read your writing 
in the Landmark. 

Please say what you think' of 
what I have written. If you think 
it is worthy of a place in the good 
old Landmark, you may publish i ( . 

Your little sister if one at all, 
MRS. A. E. SMITH. 
Robersonville, N. C. 



TAKE A STAND. 

Until I was born again, I of com-; e 
stood with the Ai'menians, but 
when quite young I was taught by 
the Holy Spirit that salvation is by 
grace, and since I have stood firmly 
and unshaken upon the deep con- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



85 



viction that "Salvation is of the 
Lord." At the first of my public 
life I cast my lot with the Mission- 
ary Baptists, for in that day some 
of their preachers preached I 
thought what we call sound doc- 
trine. But I learned more and 
more what a mix up they were and 
I came out and joined the old school 
Baptists and showed thereby where 
I stood. I have never been afraid 
nor ashamed to "take a stand." The 
old school Baptists ordained me to 
preach, and on all issues it has been 
easy to tell how I stood. 

I have endeavored to be scrip- 
tural on all matters of controversy, 
and then to be steadfast, immov- 
able, always abounding in the work 
of the Lord. 

I, like Paul, have preached the 
gospel of God with much conten- 
tion, and having passed over such a 
road as this it has been necessary 
that we take a stand; and now, I 
have finished my course, and soon 
must go hence, and as to what dis- 
position God will finally make of 
this mortal body, all who know me 
know where I stand on this. 

On the question of circumcision, 
Paul took a stand, and held nei- 
ther circumcision nor uncircumcis- 
ion availed anything in point of 
eternal life, but we must be, in or- 
der to be saved — "new creatures." 
Peter stood with the Gentiles for a 
while, and showed no difference 
between them and the Jew, but 
fearing the Jews he dissembled. 
And Barnabas was also carried 
away. But Paul stood firm to the 
truth and "reproved Peter to the 
face, because he was to be blamed." 
When Paul was called to be an 
apostle, and Jesus was revealed to 
him, the Lord said unto him, "Arise 
and stand upon thy feet," etc. And 



he always obeyed this call and 
stood firm unto the end. 

Certain men came down from 
Judea and taught the brethren, 
Except you be circumcised after the 
manner of Moses you can not be 
saved. Paul stood firm and the 
church at Jerusalem sustained him 
in his disputation ; and condemned 
those Pharisees. 

Moses refused to be called the 
son of Pharoah's daughter, and 
took his stand with the afflicted, 
and when he saw one of them "suf- 
fer wrong," he "defended" him, 
and avenged him that was oppress- 
ed. As for a few now who are will- 
ing to defend a brother in the right. 
When the devout men tool: Stephen 
to his burying, and made gre:.t lam- 
entation over him, they proved 
thereby where they stood upon a 
most vital issue of the day. There 
were but two sides, and but two 
classes of performers, and these 
devout men were not afraid to say 
by their actions where they stood. 
Some years ago I was informed of 
the contention of Eld. J. E. W. Hen- 
derson over certain points, I took a 
stand with him, and remain so until 
now. 

Elder W. B. Morgan preached 
what we know is heresy in this 
field where I have suffered so long, 
and being of this territory, I stand 
like a brazen wall, and received the 
sanction of many churches, and I 
have no regrets for the stand I took 
at that time. Other ministers and 
brethren took his part and I now 
tell you, even weeping, as I have 
told you before, that such are the 
enemies of the cross of Christ. I 
stood with Eld. G. W. Stewart in 
his contention against Eld. Mc- 
Leroy (deceased) on the subject of 
"pre-arranged protracted meet- 



86 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ings," and I was not afraid nor 
ashamed to let my position be 
known. The Bethel association 
was organized in opposition to and 
in non-fellowship for all of the 
churches in the Beulah association, 
except those who sustained W. B. 
Morgan, and hence as they non-fel- 
lowshipped us, and we non-fellow- 
shipped them, there of course was 
no fellowship, no communion, no 
agreement, no concord, no associa- 
tion; and so they received into their 
churches all dissatisfied members 
without letters from us, and we did 
the same. Strangers can now see 
where I stand. Several years ago 
the late Eld. W. M. Mitchell of 
Opelika discovered the evil works 
of the old order of organized asso- 
ciation, and advised the dissolution 
of the Olive Association, of which 
his home church, Mt. Olive, was a 
member, and the late Elder Sylves- 
ter Hassell said in a letter to me in 
1924 that this advice was "wise and 
God-honoring" and seeing they 
were right I took the stand that 
way and they, though dead yet 
speak. I still stand there. 

A few days ago it was announced 
in a public gathering, that on last 
Saturday a meeting would be held 
to reorganize the once Olive Asso- 
ciation, but we have been informed 
that the perpetrators did not find 
the encouragement sufficient to 
warrant such a step, and hence it 
has been postponed. Elder W. M. 
Mitchell was a safe counselor, and 
the views of the noble Elder Sylves- 
ter Hassell need not be ignored. 
When the progressive Baptists pro- 
posed to take this field, I saw 
where the departure would lead to, 
and I opposed every move made by 
them, and now we can see plainly 



that they have departed from the 
faith. 

"By the grace of God I am what 
I am," so boasting is excluded any- 
way, but somehow I desired to 
retrospect a little, and in looking 
over the forty-seven years of my 
public ministry it is most consoling 
that I have not been carried about 
by the slight of men, who by cun- 
ning craftiness lie in wait to de- 
ceive, and knowing that according 
to nature I could not have long to 
tarry here, I am pleased to find that 
"He set my feet upon a rock, and 
established my goings," "and He 
has put a new song in my mouth; 
even praises to our God." Let us 
stand therefore and having done all 
to stand. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



A MESSAGE FROM ELDER 
FAGG. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Publisher Zion's Landmark, 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Friend : 

I wish to say a few words through 
your paper, to my brethren and 
friends, many of whom have made 
inquiries as to my recent illness. 

On December the 13th. I was 
placed in Lawrence Hospital in this 
City, a very sick man. I could not 
rest or sleep and felt that perhaps 
the end was near. A few days 
later, I sent for Elder O. J. Denny. 
He came and I talked with him and 
asked that he or some other officer 
of his bank advise with my com- 
panion about their business matters 
should I be removed. 

I also asked that he remember 
my churches, and expressed the 
hope that men would not come 
among them after I was gone who 
would tear down rather than try 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



87 



to build, or maintain peace among 
them. 

I commented on the good editor- 
ials being printed in the Landmark 
as they have had my approval. I 
felt to ask him to remember me and 
my loved ones, and he said let us do 
that now. He stood by my bedside 
and prayed with such sweetness, 
such strength and comfort, and we 
parted, both in tears. He returned 
to his desk and I was so relieved 
that I was blest to turn over for the 
first time in days and had an hour 
and a half of sweet refreshing 
sleep and have steadily improved 
since. 

I felt and still feel that the Lord 
still answers prayer. May the 
Lord be praised forever. I hope 
to soon be restored to my family 
and churches. 

May the Landmark readers feel 
to remember me and mine. In a 
sweet hope. 

Elder J. A. Fagg. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



LOVE THINKETH NO EVIL. 

Dear Editors: 

Enclosed please find check for 
one dollar to pay for Zion's Land- 
mark for six months. My subscrip- 
tion was out September 15, 1929, 
so you can set up the date to make 
it paid up six months from Septem- 
ber 15, 1929. I hope you will ex- 
cuse me for not sending it sooner, 
as I've not been very well myself, 
and my very old mother is in poor 
health and I have been helping her 
along. I feel like I can say I love 
the paper and the cause it stands 
for. I feel like I love all the Lord's 
humble poor little children, for I 
am one, I feel the least, but oh that 
it was like it was in the days of 
old, more Christian love, when they 



meet before preaching and talk of 
God and His love. He that loveth 
is born of God and love worketh no 
ill to his brother. There is no envy- 
ing, but peace. Oh I want the 
prayers of all the Lord's little chil- 
dren and I feel the need of them. I 
feel like I want to pray every hour, 
but not for form or fashion. I hear 
many around me saying during 
their revival meeting to their small 
girls and boys, "If you want to join 
the church you must pray." Oh 
how pitiful to me. I know natural 
teaching is good for every one, but 
we can't put the creature higher 
than God. May all who have been 
taught by men and money only, be 
brought to Christ. 

I will say I do love so much to 
read all your pieces. It is to me as 
dew on a withered plant. 

"I glory His cause to greet, 
I choose the way I once abhorred, 
Find at times His promise sweet, 
If I did not love the Lord." 
Wishing you all much success. 
A little sister in hope, 

MRS. J. S. SMITH, 
Wilson Mills, N. C. 



LOST HEAVILY BY FIRE. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

Please find enclosed $2.00 for 
which I wish to renew my subscrip- 
tion to the Landmark. The time 
expired in September and I thank 
you for still sending it to me. We 
had a disastrous fire last March 
and lost our store and household 
goods and have been hard up for 
money is why I didn't send in my 
subscription sooner. My father 
was a subscriber to the Landmark 
and I have read it for 35 years. 

Mrs. T. T. Iddings. 
Grumpier, W. Va. 



88 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



CONTAINS THE TRUTH. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C. 

Enclosed find money order for 
one dollar ($1.00) to pay my sub- 
scription to the Landmark for an- 
other year. I don't see how myself 
and wife could do without the Land- 
mark. If not deceived we believe 
and love the principles of truth the 
Landmark sets forth as we under- 
stand it is in Jesus. We fully in- 
dorse the stand the Editors have 
taken to avoid extremes, strife and 
confusion and publish only that 
which makes for peace. 

O Lord bless the Landmark to 
live long to thine own honor and 
glory and to the comfort of the 
household of faith, is the prayer of 
this poor sinner, if not deceived. 

Unworthily, yours, 
ELD. W. W. STYRON, 

Roe, N. C. 



FOR THE WIDOW OF A NEGRO 
PREACHER. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold : 

Enclosed find check $2.00 for 
Henrietta Henderson, 704 E. Petti- 
grew St., Durham, N. C. She came 
in my office yesterday and asked 
me to send you the money for 
Landmark. I take pleasure in doing 
all I can for the Baptists, white or 
colored. She is the wife of Elder 
Henderson, a negro preacher that 
died last year. He was of this city 
and was well thought of by all. 
Thank you to give her credit for an- 
other year. Wishing for you and 
the dear old Landmark much suc- 
cess tor this the new year. 
Yours truly, 

J. J. WHITLEY, 

Durham, N. C. 



READERS FOR MANY YEARS 

Mr. Jno. D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

I am enclosing money order for 
$2.00 for which please continue 
my subscription to the dear Land- 
mark. My husband and I have 
been readers of this paper for 
many years and I feel I cannot get 
along without it. My husband is 
afflicted and we do not get to 
church so often and it has become 
one of our daily companions, and 
we are greatly attached to it. 

I wish you much success for this 
New Year. A sister in hope of a 
better life beyond the grave. 

MRS. S. H. AKERS, 
R. F. D. 2, Box 185, 
Roanoke, Va. 



READING LANDMARK ALL OF 
HIS LIFE. 

Dear Sirs: 

Enclosed find check to pay my 
subscription to the Landmark for 
1930. It has been coming in my 
family since I could first remember 
and I am nearly sixty years old. 1 
consider it one of the soundest Prim- 
itive Baptist papers we have. Hop- 
ing you continued success, I am, 
Yours in hope, 
R. S. Willaims, 
Dry Fork, Va. 



BROTHER JONES IN THE 
HOSPITAL. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend : 

I have been in the Clinic Hospital 
at Greensboro a little over 3 weeks 
and had a heavy operation. I suf- 
fered greatly, yet I was wonder- 
fully blessed. I appeared like I 
had been in a doze of sleep. I 
roused up and felt like there was 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



89 



some one standing by me. They 
said read the 600 song in Loyd's 
Hymn Book. I finally got to read 
it and felt like it was all true. The 
last few lines were wonderfully 
sweet to me. I have been with 
my brother, T. A. Jones and Will 
Wolff and wife about 8 days and 
am still improving. His wife is my 
niece and a daughter of my brother 
J. W. Jones. He was a deacon of 
the Primitive Baptist Church at 
Union, N. C, and my niece is a 
member at the same church. I have 
felt like she is a mother in Israel 
which is very sweet to me. 

You will please change my ad- 
dress of my Landmark from Revo- 
lution, Greensboro, N. C, to Rock- 
ford, N. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 74. 
Yours in hope, 

J. R. JONES 



LANDMARK A COMPANION. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend : 

Inclosed find check for $2.00 to 
pay my subscription to Landmark 
to August, 1930. You will please 
change my address from Dry Fork, 
Va., to Gretna, Va. Please excuse 
my neglect. I have just entered 
my 85th year. Do not expect to be 
here very much longer. After los- 
ing my dear wife the Landmark is 
my next dearest companion. I want 
to take it as long as I can read. I 
sincerely ask the prayers of all of 
God's people. 

Yours truly, 

F. T. Brumsfield. 



IMPROVING SOME BUT 
NEEDS HELP. 

My dear Mr. Gold: 

Your kind letter to hand and I 
thank you, and please thank Mrs. 
Greenway for being so kind to me. 



I am yet a great sufferer, per- 
haps some better. Yet my finan- 
cial condition is very poor. I have 
spent every thing trying to regain 
my health, but I am ashamed to beg 
yet if friends could help me, I might 
improve. I yet thank you for what 
you have done in the past and if 
the brethren and friends could 
help me a bit now, I would feel 
very thankful, but I am not worthy. 
I again thank you for all the kind- 
ness, and for your charitable effort. 

Very kindly, 
D. W. TOPPING, 

Pantego, N. C. 



PLEASED WITH THE 
LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 
Dear Sirs: 

Enclosed find my check for the 
Zion's Landmark for another year. 

I have not regretted a single 
minute that I have spent in reading 
the Landmark. It really has been 
of great service to me in many re- 
spects. I am not looking to the 
things I see in life but to the prom- 
ise of God where rest and security 
lies. I think there would be more 
followers of Christ if we had the 
love in our heart as Abraham did 
when he gave his only son as a sac- 
rifice to God. The Landmark in 
my preference is next to the Bible 
and the Bible gives us a wonderful 
promise. We are all followers and 
if we are followers Christ says, "I 
will not forget you but lo! I will be 
with you to the end of the world." 
All of us are very imperfect and we 
feel it but it will be a great benefit 
to every individual to observe the 
rules to the best of his or her ability 
given in the Landmark. 

Mrs. Edwin Winfon, 
Fremont, N. C. 



90 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy tathers have set." 

Editor 

Slder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
tilder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIII. No76 

Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSON, N. C. FEB. 1, 1930 



REGARDING A HOME FOR 
AGED AND INFIRM MINISTERS. 

What publicity has been given to 
this matter has been without my 
having authorized any statement 
nor have I been consulted about the 
matter except as it has been 
brought to my attention through 
the Landmark columns. 

Since I have been called on 
through the Landmark, by Elder 
W. M. Monsees, to say something 
about such a movement, I have re- 
ceived some inquiries as to what 
was to be done, and; today, I am 
in receipt of a letter from a sister 
in Virginia, inquiring to know if 
ministers will be admitted from 
other States if such a home is built 
in North Carolina. 

These inquiries prompt me to 
say, that; I do not think such a 
movement will meet with success. 
Our people are very slow to take 
financial burdens on themselves, 
often sorely neglecting their own 
church houses and their own minis- 
ters who go in and out before them, 



in season and out of season, especi- 
ally, is this neglect apparent in 
their failure to provide for their 
pastors. 

Charity begins at home. A 
church owes a duty to its pastor 
and to the poor of the flock. Most 
of the pastors of my own personal 
acquaintance, prefer to suffer much 
neglect, rather than bring down 
upon their heads the criticism that 
usually follows any effort to bestir 
their people about meeting the 
small financial burdens of church 
life. I am one of that number, and 
knowing how hard it is to raise a 
few dollars to make repairs on 
church buildings or to care for the 
poor among us, I do not see any 
hope of bestirring a sufficient in- 
terest among our people, to build 
and care for a home for the use 
and comfort of our aged or decrepit 
ministers. 

J know that most of our ministers 
have rendered much free and faith- 
ful service without reward or hope 
of reward so far as the goods of 
this world are concerned, and any 
movement on the part of any indi- 
vidual or group of individuals to 
make life more comfortable for our 
poor and dependent ministers ought 
to be looked upon with favor, and 
we believe the donors will be re- 
warded in the doing of such deeds; 
but to my mind, most, if not all of 
our ministers would much prefer to 
die or spend their declining years 
among those they have served 
rather than to be sent away to some 
home provided for their care. 
Brethren, I do not know how to be 
otherwise than frank. I have 
spoken. Let others do likewise if 
they see fit. Personally I hope to 
die among those I have served. 

O. J. DENNY. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



91 



SOWING AND REAPING. 

The Levites were the Priestly 
Tribe of Israel, a chosen people. 
"And the Lord spake unto Moses 
saying, "Take the Levites from 
among the children of Israel, and 
cleanse them." Num. 8:5: "For all 
first born of the children of Israel 
are mine, both man and beast; on 
the day I smote every first born in 
the land of Egypt I sanctified them 
for myself." "And I have taken the 
Levites for all the first born of the 
children of Israel." Numbers 8:17- 
18. 

To this chosen people God re- 
counted His promised blessings for 
obedience, and curses for disobed- 
ience. This the Law has ever done. 
Yet all have sinned and fallen un- 
der the curse of the broken law. If 
the law could have given life, then 
Christ died in vain. The law could 
not give life; but there is a blessing, 
a comfort in life (but not in order 
to become a living character) in the 
keeping of the commandments, in 
so far as God doth enable us to so 
do. 

God said to the Levites, His 
chosen people, "Ye shall keep my 
sabbaths, and reverence my sanctu- 
ary: I am the Lord. If ye walk in 
my statutes, and keep my command- 
ments, and do them ; then will I 
give you rain in due season, and the 
land shall yield her increase, and 
the trees of the field shall yield 
their fruit; and your threshing shall 
reach unto the vintage, (or harvest 
time) and the vintage (or harvest 
I time) shall reach unto the sowing 
time; and ye shall eat your bread 
I to the full, and dwell in your land 
; safely." What a blessing promised 
' for obedience, and yet they fail to 
find the true blessing found only in 
' obedience and not for obedience. 



To this same chosen people, this 
Priestly Tribe, God said "But if ye 
will not hearken unto me, and will 
not do my commandments, and if 
ye shall despise my statutes, or if 
your soul abhor my judgments, so 
that ye will not do my command- 
ments, but that ye break my cove- 
nant; I (the Lord) also will do this 
unto you; I will even appoint over 
you terror, consumption, and the 
burning ague, that shall consume 
your eyes, and cause sorrow of 
heart; and ye shall sow your seed 
in vain, for your enemies shall eat 
it." Leviticus 26th. chapter, with 
46 verses recounting blessings for 
obedience and curses for disobed- 
ience. 

The point we would like to im- 
press upon the reader, is the fact, 
that ; when the Lord directs the sow- 
ing, the reaping is full and satisfy- 
ing. 

There was a famine in the land 
in Isaac's day, And the Lord ap- 
peared unto him, and said, "Go 
not down into Egypt; dwell in the 
land which I shall tell thee of; so- 
journ in the land, and I will be with 
thee, and I will bless thee; for unto 
thee, and unto thy seed, I will give 
all these countries; and I will per- 
form the oath which I sware unto 
Abraham thy father, and I will 
make thy seed to multiply as the 
stars of heaven, and in thy seed 
shall all the nations of the earth be 
blessed;" "Because that Abraham 
obeyed my voice, and kept my 
charge, my commandments, my 
statutes and my laws." And Isaac 
dwelt in the land of Ge-rar: Then 
Isaac sowed in that land, and re- 
ceived the same year an hundred 
fold, and the Lord blessed him." 
Gen. 26th. chapter. 

God is not slack concerning His 



92 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



promises. Peter said, "Repent, and 
be baptised every one of you in the 
name of Jesus Christ for the remis- 
sion of sins, and ye shall receive the 
gift of the Holy Ghost. For the 
promise is unto you, and your chil- 
dren, and to all that are afar off, 
even as many as the Lord your God 
shall call." Acts 2:38-39. 

May the Lord give to His people 
seed time and harvest, and so direct 
our going forth,that we may sow 
the seed, that; the Lord hath bless- 
ed, that the yield may be an hun- 
dred fold, and to Him be given all 
the honour, glory, dominion and 
praise. 

In the morning of this new year, 
as we look forward to the time of 
sowing and harvesting, literally, 
may we feel to implore the bless- 
ings of the Lord that our labors be 
not in vain, since every good gift, 
as well as every perfect gift cometh 
from the Father of light, with 
whom there is no variableness, nei- 
ther shadow of turning. And in 
our sowing, in a spiritual sense, may 
we be truly blessed to sow, as Paul 
admonished the Gallatian brethren 
in the 6th. chapter of Gallatians. 

We read from that chapter, 
"Bear ye one another's burdens, 
and so fulfill the law of Christ. For 
if a man thinketh himself to be 
something, when he is nothing, he 
deceiveth himself. Be not deceiv- 
ed; God is not mocked: for whatso- 
ever a man soweth, that shall he 
also reap. For he that soweth to 
the flesh shall of the flesh reap cor- 
ruption; but he that soweth to the 
Spirit shall of the spirit reap life 
everlasting." 

The works of the flesh are mani- 
fest, which are these; Adultery, for- 
nication, uncleanness, lascivious- 
ness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred. 



variance, emulations, wrath, strife, 
seditions, heresies, envyings, mur- 
ders, drunkenness, revilings, and 
such like. 

"But the fruits (of spiritual sow- 
ings) of the Spirit is love, joy, 
peace, longsuffering, gentleness, 
goodness, faith, meekness, temper- 
ance; against such there is no law." 
Gal. 5:19-23. 

Doubtless the Levites — the 
chosen people of God, felt as we 
feel, that they were left without 
excuse when they inherited the 
fruits of the flesh; but to God be all 
the praise when blessings came up- 
on them, whether it was natural or 
spiritual. 

The prophet Isaiah said, "And 
the works of righteousness shall be 
peace; and the effect of righteous- 
ness quietness and assurance for- 
ever, and my people shall dwell ir 
a peaceable habitation, and in sun 
dwelling, and in quiet resting 
places, "Look upon Zion, the cit> 
of our solemnities: thine eyes shal 
see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, i 
tabernacle that shall not be taker 
down ; not one of the stakes thereo 
shall ever be removed, neither shal 
any of the cords thereof be broken 
For the Lord is our judge, the Lon 
is our lawgiver, the Lord is ou 
King; He will save us." Isaiah 33d 
chapter. 

Yours in hope, 

O. J. DENNY. 



IRENE M. YOUNG 

Having been appointed by the church c 
her membership to write as best I can, 
suitable sketch of the life and death 0 
our dear sister, Irene M. Young, by th 
help of the Lord I will do so. 

She was born July 23, 1877 and die 
July 3, 1929 making her about 52 year 
old. 

About five years ago she had a nervou 
breakdown due, it is thought, to overwor 
and lei making a change from day to uigb 
work, which greatly impaired her healtl 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



93 



jHer condition became so bad mentally tbat 
she was placed in the State Hospital for 
the insane and was speedily restored to 
usual Health and returned home. After 
taking a rest, she resumed her usual du- 
ties and until a few days before her death 
li emed to be in the best of spirits. But a 
few days previous she began speaking to 
relatives of her troubles. It was easy to 
iiscover that her mental capacity was be- 
•oming impaired and in a lew days she 
ommitted the awful act of taking her 
latural life by taking gas. 

We do not feel that she was respon- 
ible for her act being mentally unbal- 
inced and is now sweetly resting in the 
rins of Jesus. 
I had known her for about 18 years. I 
ifiever knew a more consecrated, Chris- 
ian character in all my life. She was of 
most lovable disposition, very modest 
nd unassuming ill her conversation. It 
as her delight to talk on heavenly and 
ivine things. 

She had a good aud precious hope of the 
leased resurrection and glorification and 
(reservation of the saints to glory. 
I It was a great shock to us all, when we 
j iarned of the tragedy. But we sorrow 
I ,ot as those who have no hope, but feel 
lliat our loss is her eternal gain. Earth 
I poorer and Heaven is richer. She is 
lot dead but sleepeth and on the great and 

I orious morn of the resurrection, when 
■sus shall descend from Heaven, with a 

i iout and with the voice of the Arch An- 
ml and with the trumpet of God, dear 
.ster Irene's body will be raised and 
rshioned like unto the glorious body of 
Itr Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and 
Mil be caught up together with the sleep- 
ing saints to meet the Lord in the air and 
\ti shall she be ever with the Lord. The 
Moatle John says, "We know we have 
Ij.ssed from death unto life, because we 
fl|ve the brethren." And we fully believe 
lie did love them and enjoyed being with 
Bern and speaking to them of her hope 
i:d the joys of her salvation. Paul, in 
■taking of the love of God towards His 
pople, asks the question, "What shall be 
Ele to separate us from the love of God, 

II it is in Christ Jesus? And then he 
. iinitions a long list of powers and con- 
■ lldes by saying, I am persuaded that 

■Jne of these things shall be able to sep- 
■ Ue us from the love of God, as it is in 
Crist Jesus the Lord." 
llMay God in His mercy enable each of 

•fclto emulate her good life and character 

' l|i may we all some sweet day meet her 
ll join with her in that song that none 
Ifild learn save the hundred, forty and 
Mr thousand who had the seal of God in 

''jjir foreheads, which to my mind rep- 
Bents the church triumphant. 

:1 |}y order of Oak Grove Church in Con- 
snce. 

Wm. MONSEES, Moderator 
;x, N. C. W. G. WOODWARD, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, our Heavenly Father in iris 
infinite wisdom did on the 1st day of Jan- 
uary, 1929, call home our beloved sister, 
Mrs. Emily J. Hardee, 

Whereas, we deem it proper that we 
make some mention of the loss which we 
have sustained by her death, 

Therefore be it resolved, 

1st. That in the death of sister Har- 
dee, the church at Red Banks has lost a 
worthy member, the community, a most 
excellent neighbor, one that will be 
missed. 

2nd. That while we desire to be submis- 
sive to the will of Him who "worketh all 
tiling.'; after the counsel of His own will," 
we cannot refrain from expressing our 
grief, nor forbear making mention of one 
who was so dear to us. 

3rd. That we extend to the bereaved 
ones our most sincere sympathy. 

4th. That these resolutions be sent to 
the Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of the church at Red 
Banks, Saturday before the 2nd Sunday in 
September, 1929. 

Elder Luther Joyner, Mod. 
Mrs. Zeb. R. Gay, Clerk. 
Farmville, N. C. 



MRS. DINICIE INMAN 

On December 8th., Mrs. Dinicie C. In- 
man, widow of the late Joel J. Inman 
quietly fell asleep in Jesus in the 82nd 
year of her age. She was born near Whit- 
mell, Va., March 18, 1848 and lived an in- 
dustrious and useful life in that commun- 
ity. After the death of her husband in 
1908 she moved to Schoolfield and has 
lived with me ever since. Mrs. Inman 
was the mother of 10 children, all pre- 
ceding her to the grave, but leaves 7 
grand children. Mrs. Inman joined the 
Danville Primitive Baptist Church in 
1918 and was baptised into the fellow- 
ship of that church by Elders J. F. Spang- 
Ier and J. R. Wilson, together with four 
others, both ministers doing the baptising. 

On December 1st, Mrs. Inman arose as 
usual and after breakfast complained of 
being cold and returned to her bed, but 
said she was not sick, but the family 
physician was called in and attended her 
as long as she lived. Everything was done 
lor her that could be done, but to no avail 
and on Sunday night December 8th., at 
10:55 she passed peacefully away. 

Her funeral was conducted on the Tues- 
day following by her pastor, Elder J. F. 
Spangler, assister by Elder W. R. Dodd. 

Written by her son-in-law, 

W. L. PARKER. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

The following resolutions of respect in 
memory of Sister Luella Dean and Sister 
India Ellis, were passed by the church at 
Tar River. 



94 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



The church at Tar River, recognizing 
and feeling the loss we have sustained in 
the death of our beloved sisters, they 
being sisters in the flesh and in the spirit, 
as we hope, and well stricken in years, 
being buried the same day. Although 
Sister Ellis was a member of Camp Creek 
church, she attended Tar River as regu- 
lar as a member. We feel it our duty tc 
manifest our love and appreciation for 
their faithfulness to the church. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

1st. That we feel in their death we 
have lost two humble, sincere and faith- 
ful sisters, always extending a helping 
hand in caring for our pastor and other 
expenses pertaining to the church. Al- 
though taken from the evils of this world 
we grieve not for them as we would for 
those that have no hope, but believe they 
have fought a good fight and gone to a 
better world. 

Resolved, 2nd. That a copy of these 
resolutions be spread on the church book, 
a copy sent to the family and a copy sent 
to Zion's Landmark with a request to be 
published. 

Signed by the order of the church, 

Eld. B. F. McKenney, Mod. 
D. T. Adcock, Clerk. 



FRANCES J. DANIELS 

In loving memory of Frances J. Daniels, 
the wife of Capt. J. S. Daniels, and daugh- 
ter of Whitney and Jane Roberson, his 
wife. 

Sister Daniels was born on Cedar Is- 
land, in Carteret County, N. C, on October 
1st., 1854, departed this life, August 28, 
1929, making her sojourn here on earth 
74 years, 10 months and 2 7 days. 

Her kind husband preceded her to the 
grave by 1 4 days. 

Sister Daniels received a sweet hope in 
the Lord many years ago and was made 
willing to go before the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at Cedar Island on the third 
Sunday in May 1885, relating to the 
church what great things the Lord had 
done for her. She was received into the 
fellowship of the church and baptized the 
same day by her beloved pastor, John R. 
Rowe, after which she lived a consistent 
member until death. 

Loved and respected by her church, 
neighbors and friends, Sister Daniels, near- 
est relatives were four nieces and four 
nephews, whom she leaves, with the 
church of her membership, to mourn their 
loss, but we feel that our loss is her eter- 
nal gain to live with Christ in God. 

The funeral service was conducted by 
the writer, after which her dead body was 
laid to rest in the family burying groud, 
there to await the resurrection of the 
dead. Then and not until then shall this 
corruption put on incorruption and this 
mortal put on immortality, and then shall 
death have no power over her since the 
vile body has been raised and fashioned 



like unto the glorious body of her Lord 
and Saviour. 

W. W. STYRON, 

Roe, N. C. 



ALDERMAN RAGGETT 

On the night of Aug. 1, 19 29, at 8 
o'clock, our dear father, Alderman Bag- 
gett, quietly and peacefully passed from 
this world to a world beyond. We feel 
that he is resting in the arms of a Sav- 
iour's love. Father was 70 years and 10 
months old. He leaves to mourn his 
death, a wife and 3 children, 14 grand 
children. The children are Mrs. Addicus 
McLamb of Salemburg, N. C, Mrs. El- 
dridge McLamb of Benson, Avery Baggett, 
near the old home. His second oldest 
daughter, Mrs. F. L. Strickland preceded 
him to the grave just 3 months and 3 days. 

Father's health began to fail very fast 
along in February. His doctor advised 
him to go to the hospital but he would 
not consent to go. He said he wanted to 
die at home. But the first Saturday in 
July his suffering had become so great 
till he did consent to go for an examina- 
tion. They persuaded him to stay for a 
few days treatment. He consented to stay 
a week, but seemed to realize that all 
earthly help was in vain and that he 
could not get well and told his son-in-law 
how he wanted to be buried. Just a plain 
home made coffin, and no flowers unless 
it was some that a friend might have that 
they had grown at home. All was done 
for him that kind hands and loved one? 
could do, but none could stay the cold icy 
hand of death. Funeral services were 
conducted by his pastor, M. F. Westbrook. 
Then he was laid to rest in the family 
burying ground near the home. 

Father had been a member of Harnett 
Primitive Baptist church 42 years, always 
filling his seat unless providentially hin- 
dered. 

Dearest father, how we have missed 
thee, no one on earth can tell, but to you 
we had to bid farewell. 

A devoted daughter, 

MRS. E. McLAMB, 

Benson, N. C. 



MRS. P. L. STRICKLAND 

On the 29th day of last April, the Lord 
saw fit to call from our midst our dear 
and most precious sister, Mrs. F. L. Strick- 
land. She was the daughter of Aldermar. 
and Romelia Baggett. Her stay here on 
earth was 40 years and C months. She 
leaves to mourn her death, a husband and 
2 children, one brother and two sisters, an 
aged father and mother, but oh how sad 
it makes our hearts when we think of 
never seeing our sweet sister any more on 
earth. But we hope to meet you, dear 
sister, in that sweet heaven above where 
all is peace and love. I can just see how 
her sweet face looked the last time I saw 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



95 



her before she died. She came out to the 
car to tell us goodbye and said she was 
coming before long.. 

She had spent most of her married life 
with father and mother. She seemed to 
be a dear companion for all the family, 
more especially mother as the rest were 
out at work so much of the time. 

She had been suffering for most 10 
years with high blood pressure but seemed 
to be lots better at the time of her death. 
She was seemingly in the best of spirits 
just a few minutes before the Lord called 
her to come and live with him on high. I 
got to her home just a little while before 
she breathed her last, but could not bear 
to see her struggling. Oh, how sad. None 
but those that have tried it know how 
hard it is. 

Sister had been a member of the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church for nearly 21 years, 
always filling her seat unless providen- 
tially hindered. Funeral services were 
conducted by her pastor, Elder Millard 
Westbrook after which she was laid to rest 
in the family burying ground near the old 
home. 

Oh! when we sit and think of you dear 
sister and life's trials seem so hard, oh! 
how we long for your loving voice and a 
touch of your gentle hand. Although you 
could not speak to us and could not say 
goodbye, we known your thoughts were 
with us when you were called to die. 

A devoted sister, 

Mrs. E. McLamb, 

Benson, N. U. 



JAMES EDWARD BRIDGMAN 

It is with a sad heart that I attempt to 
write a sketch of my father's life and 
death. 

He was born Oct. 29th., 1844 in Hyde 
Co., North Carolina, making his stay on 
earth S3 years, five months and five days. 

He was a Confederate soldier, belonging 
to the 3 3rd regiment, was wonded in the 
battle at New Bern, was taken to the hos- 
pital, finally recovered and came home. 
Later, he was married to Elizabeth Credle 
Farrow (widow of Isaac Farrow a Confed- 
eral officer who was killed in battle.) To 
this union were born two children, the 
writer being the older, the other dying in 
infancy. 

This wife died and he then married 
Mary Ann Midyette. To this union were 
born seven children. Two died when 
email. Tho other five still survive. Three 
: on •, R. C. Bridgman, E. E. Bridgman, 
.-a' 1 r ". C-. Bridgman; two daughters, Mrs. 
C W. Brown and Mrs. S. R. Rice. 

'•'!•<•!• are also nineteen living grand- 
children and three great grandchildren. 

He was a strong believer in the Bap- 
tist church, but never joined. When asked 
why he did not join, he would always say 
that he was not good enough. But, his 
door was always open to all. I have 



heard him say that he never turned any- 
one away from his door. 

He was a hard working man and ac- 
cumulated right much of this world's 
goods with which he was liberal. 

He lived an honorable life and died an 
honorable death. 

Dear father thou hast left us and our 
loss we deeply feel. You cannot come to 
us but we will shortly go to you where 
there will be no more sad fare-you-well. 

Written by his oldest daughter, 

MRS. G. M. JARVIS. 



ANNIE WHITE BUTTS 

There comes a great sadness over me, 
when I find the duty imposed on me to 
write a memorial of our dear sister, An- 
nie W. Butts. However incapable" I feel 
to do the subject justice, will say dear sis- 
ter, yours was a pure life and we loved 
you. Your gentleness of character, kind- 
ness of heart is seldom realized in this sin- 
defiled world; your spiritual walk and 
Christian demeanor will live in our hearts 
long after your precious body has mingled 
with the dust of the earth. 

She was born January 2 6, 1859 and 
died September 28, 19 29 making her stay 
on earth 70 years, 8 months and 2 days. 
She was married to Wade Butts Nov. 26, 
1879. 

Will say just here, Bro. Butts was our 
beloved clerk and deacon, who died in Feb- 
ruary of this year, and for whom we still 
lament the loss to us. 

Sister Butts was the mother of three 
children, two of whom preceded both 
herself and husband to the grave. Herbert 
the only living one, she made her home 
with, and indeed it was a pleasant home. 
Such a beautiful devotion between mother 
and son. He did all in his power to 
make her happy, granted every wish or 
desire of her heart possible for him to do. 

It was my privilege and pleasure to 
spend Thursday with her before she left 
us Saturday. All seemed peaceful and 
quiet with her. She talked very little 
owing to weakness. I did not then feel 
she would leave so soon. Went again Fri- 
day and saw she had . grown decidedly 
weaker. On Saturday night between the 
hours of eight and nine her spirit took its 
flight to join her husband and the angels 
in that world that knows no end. 

Her body was laid to rest on Sunday af- 
ternoon in the Scotland Neck Baptist 
cemetery, Mr. Kirk officiating. The floral 
offering which was indeed a lovely one 
attested the love and esteem of many 
friends as the last tribute of affection. 

I do believe with all the sincerity of my 
heart, she is with Jesus, basking in the 
sunshine of His love, awaiting the resur- 
rection morn, when we, too, hope to arise 
in His likeness, see Him as He is, be like 
Him and be satisfied. 

WILLIE A. RIDDICK. 



96 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



LIZZIE A. LOVITT 

It is with a sad heart I will try to write 
the death of my dear old mother, Lizzie 
Lovitt. Dear mother was born June 2 2, 
1875, and died November 31, 1927. 

Mother was in bad health a long time, 
but was only sick a short time before she 
died. The doctor, her loving husband and 
her children did all they could to keep 
her with them. But the good Lord knows 
best so he called her home. 

She joined the old Primitive Baptist 
church at North East. I do not know the 
date she joined, but she was a faithful 
member as long as she lived. I have 
known her to walk three miles to her 
church, and it is sad to go to North East 
and not see dear mother's happy face. I 
believe she has gone to rest and I hope I 
will meet her where parting is no more. 

Oh, it was so heart breaking to stand 
by my dear mother and see the last breath 
leave her. All of her children were with 
her but two. When she breathed her last 
one daughter was in Durham, one in Fly. 
It was sad for she had left three weeks 
before. Left dear mother well and had 
been out there just three weeks when she 
had to come home and find her dear mo- 
ther laying a corps. It looked like more 
than she could bear when she got there. 
But the Lord is able for all things. 

The home was broken up when dear 
mother left. She leaves a husband, and 
ten children living. Two preceded their 
mother to the grave a few years ago. She 
leaves 8 grandchildren, one brother and 
three sisters. 

Her funeral was preached by Elder E. 
W. Banks who spoke kind words to the 
heartbroken loved ones. Then her body 
was lowered in the grave to await the 
resurrection morn when the Lord shall 
come to gather his children home. I be- 
lieve mother has gone to rest, for she had 
a good hope till the end came. I hope I 
will meet mother in the sweet by and by. 

A precious one from us is gone, 

A voice we loved is still, 
A vacant place is in our home, 

Which never can be filled. 
Written by her son, 

A. F. LOVITT. 



THOMAS S. HEDRICK 

Thomas S. Hedrick was born in David- 
son County, December 17th., 1857, died 
at his home at High Point, N. C. May 6th 
19 29 in his 71st year. He was the son of 
Jesse and Susan Hedrick. He was mar- 
ried to Mary Lou Greer March 5th., 1882. 
He leaves to mourn his absence, his wife, 
five sons, J. F., W. J., A. P., A. N., and F. 
L. Hedrick, and a host of friends. He pro- 
fessed a hope in Christ and united with 
the church at High Point April 18., 1908, 
together with his wife. They were bap- 
tized May 17th., 1908 by Elder J. A. Ash- 
burn, Two years later he was ordained 



deacon and at the time of his death was 
serving his church faithfully. He was 
faithful to attend his church meetings, 
prompt in bearing his full part of church 
expense, and to help the ministers. His 
home was an open welcome to the breth- 
ren. He was a kind loving husband, and 
a faithful, kind father to his children, a 
good citizen and hard working man. We 
surely do miss him in the church. 

He endured his suffering patiently and 
made no complaint. I visited him during 
his sickness. He talked of the goodness 
and mercy of God. His faith was unwav- 
ering. He spoke of his weakness, thus 
he felt the meekness of the lamb of God 
that took away his sins. 

Funeral services were conducted by the 
writer, together with Elder Samuel Mc- 
Millan, amid sorrowing friends and rela- 
tives. His body was laid to rest in the 
cemetery at High Point to await the resur- 
rection. May the sustaining grace of God 
be with his wife, our dear sister, in her 
lonely bereavement, together with the 
family. 

J. W. TUTTLE. 



MRS. JNO. H. BUTCHER. 

The subject of this notice was born 
January the 15th, 1866. She was the 
daughter of Elder David Moore, and born 
and raised in Person County, N. C. She 
died in Pittsylvania County, December 25, 
1929, making her stay on this earth nearly 
sixty four years. 

She professed a hope in Christ when site 
was eleven years old, but on account of 
her unworthy feeling she never united 
with the church for thirteen years. 

She joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Surl, N. C. and lived a member there 
until 1901, when after moving to Virginia 
she joined at Malmaison by letter, and re- 
mained a member until her death. 

She first married John R. Lunsford in 
188 7, who died in 1896 leaving her with 
one little boy. In 1900 she was married 
to the writer of this article. She left a 
husband, one son and five step-daughters 
to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and a 
good mother. 

She was one of the most devoted step- 
mothers I ever saw, always looking for 
their good and pleasure, and she was a 
devoted member of her church, never 
missing her meetings unless she was provi- 
dentially hindered. 

For the last few years her health was 
such that she could not always go, yet it 
was a great pleasure to her to have the 
brethren and sisters visit our home. 

Written by her grief stricken husband. 

JOHN H. BUTCHER, 

Blairs, Va., No. 2. 



FOR ELDER STEPHENSOX 

Mrs. J. W. Freeman sends Elder L. H. 
Stephenson $1.00. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 



WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIII. FEBRUARY 15, 1930 No. 7 

GOD KNOWS OUR THOUGHTS. 



At that time Abijah, the son of Jereboam, fell sick. 

And Jereboam said to his wife, Arise I pr- ^hee, and disguise thyself 
that thou be not known to be the wife of Jei ^yn; and get thee to 
Shiloh: behold there is Ahijah the prophet, wh, me that I should 

be king over his people. 

And take with thee ten loaves, and cracknels, and -fy >se of honey, and 
go to him: he shall tell thee what shall become of the^ i. 

And Jereboam's wife did so, and arose and went to^> ->h, and came 
to the house of Ahijah. But Ahijah could not see; for h „ <js were set 
by reason of his age. ' '-' 

And the Lord said unto Ahijah, Behold the wife of Jereboam cometh to 
ask a thing of thee for her son; for he is sick; thus and thus shalt thou 
say unto her: for it shall be when she cometh in she shall feign herself 
to be another woman. 

And it was so that when Ahijah heard the sound of her feet, as she 
came in at the door, that he said come in, thou wife of Jereboam; why 
feignest thou thyself to be another? for I am sent to thee with heavy 
tidings. 

Go tell Jereboam that he has done evil above all that were before thee: 
for thou hast gone and made thee other gods, and molten images to pro- 
v©ke me to anger, and has cast me behind thy back. Therefore go back 
and tell him that I will bring evil up on the house of Jereboam, and will 
take away the remnant of his house. 

Arise therefore and get thee to thine own house and when thy feet enter 
the city the child shall die. — 1 Kings 14:1-12. 

ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

92.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Zion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jeaus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Eton's Xanfcmarfc 

Bevoteb to tbe Cause of testis Christ 



THE OCEAN 

Great Basin of the Universe, 
Times ne'er can mark thy brow, 

And like thy Maker — changeless — 
From first to last art thou. 

Thou "Glorious Mirror" of the blue 
That spans the spacious sky; 

Convulsed always, yea, never still — 
Nor can we question — Why? 

Deep heaving, fathomless, sublime! 

Thy glimmering billows roll : 
I watch, and wonder what I think — 

Enraptured is my soul! 

Oh ! deep mysterious emblem ! 

Of God's great love divine: 
Gives life — takes life — gives food 
and drink — 

Oh! wondrous, sacred shrine! 

Near to thy brink I pause to think 

Amazing sight to see! 
Thy waters seem to kiss the sky — 

A mount of mystery! 

Thou grandest of creation 

So gloriously divine! 
Where man can make no footprint 

Thy realm — most wholly thine. 

He Who hath bound thy waters; 
says, 

"No further shalt thou go," 
"And thy proud waves forever 
stayed," 
To keep the overflow. 

He makes thy power merciful 

By His all-wise decree ; 
Couldst thou but pass His sand 

The world a sea would be. 



Breakers cornucopias form 

And burst to make the tide: 
Silver-capped they lave the shore 

And spread their waters wide. 
The monsters of the Deep are made 

Each one to know its zone; 
In torrid clime, or icy pole, 

Their instinct holds its own. 

In thy creation — "Lord of Lords" 
And "King of Kings" doth stand : 

Greatest and most wonderful 
This work from thine own hand! 

Earth's every stream, the great and 
small, 

All to this Ocean's flow: 
And swallowed like a tiny drop 
Into the depths below. 

Could we but cast into this Deep 
All things — since earth began — 

All cities built upon the earth — 
All progeny of man — 

And every bird and every beast 
That roams from pole to pole : 

Its billows could envelop all — 
And back to normal roll. 

Three fourths the ocean's cover 
With one fourth for the land ; 

Its depths may rage excessively — 
But can't get o'er the sand. 

'Tis He who wisely placed the sand 
The bounds of His deep sea: 

And made its ragings to obey 
His "Perpetual wise decree." 

Destruction do the rivers make 
'Gainst them there's no decree; 

Unsafe are dwellings 'long their 
banks — 
But safe near to the sea. 



98 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



We dare not ask the reason — Why? 

Nor God the reason gives 
Tis all because of His decree 

That near the sea man lives. 

The will of man must fail 
We know him by his fruit. 

The Powers of God prevail — 

His "Wills" and "Shalls" refute. 

— Lizzie Holden Garrard. 

The following scripture proves 
the Lord's perpetual decree con- 
cerning the "Wonderful Deep." 

Jeremiah 5:21, 22, to wit: "Hear 
now this O foolish people, and with- 
out understanding; which have 
eyes, and see not, which have ears, 
and hear not: "Fear ye not me? 
saith the Lord : will ye not tremble 
at my presence, which have placed 
the sand for the bound of the sea by 
a perpetual decree, that it cannot 
pass it: and though the waves, 
thereof toss themselves, yet can they 
not prevail; though they roar, yet 
can they not pass over it?" 



EXPERIENCE. 

To the Readers of Zion's Landmark 
Dear Brethren and Sisters: 

I feel like I want to write a part 
of my experience, hoping that it 
will be of some benefit to some one 
and to my children when I am gone. 

When very young, I had fears of 
being lost, and afterwards went to 
the lonesome grove to pray. My 
burden continued to increase from 
time to time. At times I thought it 
was more than I could bear, and at 
other times it was not so bad. Final- 
ly I gave it all up for loss, but the 
very breathing of my soul was, 
"Lord, Have Mercy On Me a Sin- 
ner." 

My father was a deacon of Piney 
Grove Church, and mother was a 
member of the same church. One 



Sunday they asked me to go with 
them to church. I obeyed, and 
while trodding along behind them, 
I prayed all the way for mercy. 
While Elder H. D. Mickey was 
preaching, I saw my mother sitting 
with sisters and my father sitting 
over on the other side with the 
brethren. I sat there thinking 
when they are going, they will go 
where the singing of angels are, 
when I am gone, it will be where 
there is neither eye to pity nor hand 
to deliver. I felt if I was sent to 
hell it would be just, and I wanted 
to beg Him for mercy. Suddenly, 
it seemed to me the Heavens were 
opened and I saw from whence ev- 
ery blessing that I will ever need, 
comes from. I think I was permit- 
ted to drink of the water John 
spoke of, as clear as crystal. My 
burden was gone, and I said, "Bless 
the Lord, 0 my soul, let everything 
praise His name." 

On my way home I said, "Bless 
the Lord." In the meantime, I had 
married and tried to live satisfied, 
but love sprang up for the church 
and I had a desire to be baptised 
but felt too unworthy to ask those 
good people for a home with them. 
Through much affliction, I was 
made willing to go and ask for a 
home with them. 

The weather was very cold when 
I was baptized, but when Elder J. 
A. Ashburn laid me beneath the 
wave and brought me up out of the 
water, I realized what Christ 
meant when he said, "My yoke is 
easy, my burden is light." I found 
this to be true. Gathered in the fold 
to live and to die. 

For twenty-seven years I have 
been a member of the church and 
my love for them has not grown 
cold, but still feel like saying with 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



99 



Ruth of old, "Where you live, let 
me live; where you go, let me go, I 
want your God to be my God." 

Before I joined the church, I had 
a desire to preach. One sister told 
me that I would preach sometime, 
because she saw me flying in the air 
and saw an angel come and give me 
a trumpet to blow. This gave me 
a great deal of trouble, because I 
did not feel fit for the place. I 
begged the Lord to call my neigh- 
bor, a school teacher, (O. M. Ben- 
nett a man that is worthy, as I felt.) 
Later I had the pleasure to baptize 
that good man, his wife, and his 
mother. 

Finally everything that I turned 
my hands to was a failure, and feel- 
ing, woe is me if I preach not the 
Gospel. I had no rest day nor night. 

The church met one Saturday 
night at my father's old home. One 
of the deacons asked if they had a 
right to invite me to take part in 
the service. Elders F. P. Stone, 
clerk of the Fisher's River, and L. I. 
Gilbert from the Smith River stated 
that I had the right. This is when 
I made my first attempt, in public. 
Every word I said was like taking 
a burden from my breast. The next 
day I went to Piney Grove Church 
and spoke three or four minutes. 
While I was speaking, one of the 
saints shouted, and said, "Bless the 
Lord." The same has been much 
comfort to me. The words seemed 
to me like apples of gold in pitchers 
of silver. Let me say here that 
many preachers have hurt themsel- 
ves by trying to stand too long. 

I cannot include in this letter all 
the places I have met with disap- 
pointments, but I have my doubts 
and fears. 

I was soon invited from church 
to church, and attended with great 



pleasure. I never asked for liberty 
to speak; my church felt it. I never 
asked to be ordained; churches 
wanted my services. Frequently 
people requested me to baptize 
them. My church called for my 
ordination, and I was ordained by 
Elders J. A. Ashburn, E. M. Bar- 
nard, Paul Priddy and possibly 
others. Then my wife said if she 
had known that I was going to be a 
preacher, perhaps, we would not 
have been married. She wanted 
me to stay with her and the chib 
dren. So I prayed to the Lord if he 
had called me to preach the Gospel 
to make her willing for me to leave 
her and the children, and go in His 
great name. One night she awoke 
me and said, "Jimmie, I have 
dreamed a dream and I am troubled 
almost to death. I saw you married 
to the prettiest woman I have ever 
seen. Are you going to forsake 
me and the little children?" She 
said that I was traveling in the air 
in a large circle with the woman. 
She asked me the meaning of her 
dream. I explained to her that it 
was the church that she had seen, 
and my dear brethren, I hope I am 
traveling with her. My wife was 
made willing for me to go; bless 
the good Lord. 

Later, I had the privilege of bap- 
tizing my wife, one of my sisters 
and my grandmother at the same 
time. Oh, how good the Lord has 
been to me. 

I have been trying to preach for 
about twenty-seven years and I feel 
the Lord has blessed my labors. My 
church is in peace and I have had 
the care of churches ever since my 
ordination. I had the privilege of 
baptizing Elders Watt Tuttle, S. H. 
Reid, W. J. Brown and G. W. Hill. 
I feel thankful for the privilege of 



100 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



baptizing these worthy servants. I 
hope the Lord may continue to 
bless them to preach the gospel of 
peace. 

Brethren, let us labor for the 
things that make for peace, and 
leave extreme views and hobbies 
off, for they do not edify the church 
of God. Things that bring strife 
and confusion to our minds and 
hearts are not of the Lord. 

Your unworthy brother, 
ELDER J. A. FAGG 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



"FAMINE." 

This word appears about one 
hundred times in the Bible, and 
but few of these times are mention- 
ed in the New Testament. They 
were very sane judgments from 
God, and reduced the people where 
they came, to a low estate. "Elijah 
prayed to God that it might not 
rain, and it rained not upon the 
earth for the space of three years 
and six months; and he prayed 
again and the heavens gave rain 
and the earth brought forth her 
fruit." Three years and six months 
of sore famine; and Elijah knew 
that the cause of its coming was the 
sin of Ahab, who had left the "com- 
mandments" of the Lord, and had 
followed Baalim. 1 Kings 18:18. 
Ahab could accuse Elijah of being 
the cause of this "famine" in Israel, 
but could bring no proof of it, but 
Elijah knew Ahab was the cause; 
for being King he misled Israel, 
and married Jezebel, and in many 
ways forsook the "commandments" 
of the Lord. 

During that long and trying fam- 
ine, many suffered for the sins of 
others, but we can see the hand of 
God in favor of many. I love to 
think of the dear Obadiah, and his 



words of love and faithfulness im- 
press me, for in 1 Kings 18:4, we 
read of how he sustained one hun- 
dred of the Lord's prophets from 
death, when he hid them by fifty in 
a cave; and fed them with 
bread and water. But leaving all 
of the famines mentioned in the 
Holy Bible, and about which much 
could and should be said, we wish 
here to mention but one more, and 
that one is the prophet Amos; or 
what the Lord said by him. Be- 
hold the days come, saith the Lord 
God, that I will send a "famine" in 
the land, not a famine of bread, 
nor a thirst for water, but of hear- 
ing the words of the Lord; and 
they shall wander from sea to sea, 
and from the north even to the east, 
they shall run to and fro to seek the 
word of the Lord, and shall not find 
it." Amos 8:11, 12. This appears 
to me one of the sorest famines 
mentioned in Holy writ, and de- 
serves the most careful attention. 
As common famines come for a pur- 
pose so does this one, and as all 
must suffer in the common famine, 
so must all suffer in a time when 
we may seek the word of God but 
shall not find it. My word shall 
not return unto me void, says the 
Lord. And we should give the more 
earnest heed to the things we have 
heard, lest at any time we let them 
slip, for if the word (of God) 
spoken by angels was steadfast and 
every transgression and disobedi- 
ence receive a just recompense of 
reward, how shall we escape if we 
neglect so great a salvation which 
first began to be spoken by the 
Lord, and confirmed unto us by 
them that heard him. Samuel was 
a child when the Lord called him, 
and it is contained in the scripture 
that "the word of the Lord was 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



101 



precious in those days; there was 
no open vision." Last night while 
thinking of the faithful, tried and 
true ones I have known among us, 
but have passed to a better country, 
I thought who will be raised up of 
God to fill places made vacant by 
the going of these, who remained 
faithful at all hazards, and under 
the most trying circumstances, for 
I know places where the greatest 
gifts have labored for us in days 
past, and at their own charges, and 
such places now are the most desti- 
tute, and without the true God, and 
without a teaching priest, and 
without law." 2 Chronicles 15:3. 

I do want to mention the sin of 
David in numbering Israel; God 
was so displeased with it that He 
sent God unto David to offer to him 
one of three scourges, and one was 
a "famine" of seven years, and 
King David so dreaded the effect of 
a famine of seven years duration, 
that though he saw he had brought 
himself into a "great strait," he 
wisely chose a "pestilence." 

To have said he would accept a 
famine of seven years meant death 
and misery of many, and to flee 
three months before his enemeis 
(unrestrained) put them truly in 
the hands of men, and he knew how 
merciless they are, and so he said 
to the prophet God, I take the pes- 
tilence, because God is so merciful, 
let me fall into His hands, and let 
me not fall into the hands of men. 

He had been pursued by his en- 
emy, "man," and who knew man 
more than David? Even King 
Saul had searched mountains and 
hills for him to kill him. As inno- 
cent as an angel, Saul thrust his 
javelin at him, to kill him, and lis- 
ten to what David said to Johna- 
than, "What have I done? What is 



my iniquity? And what is my Sin 
before thy father, that he seeketh 
my life?" 

Those who may be interested 
enough will please notice 1 Sam. 
20th chapter, and on several chap- 
ters, and note to some extent what 
man will do to man without God is 
with him. 

But the pestilence chosen by 
David caused the death of seventy 
thousand men, of the peoples from 
Dan even to Bersheba, but God 
showed his mercy over Israel for 
when the angel stretched out his 
hand to Jerusalem, God said, "it is 
enough." 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



THE ONLY PLACE TO GO. 

My dear Brother Denny: 

If one who feels so little and un- 
worthy may claim such a relation- 
ship — since reading your editorial 
in the last Landmark, tho' I am af- 
flicted and can't do anything well 
I felt like I enjoyed it so much, I 
must try to let you know it. It is 
just the way I believe predestina- 
tion, and I hope this will stop the 
confusion for I am tired of it, and 
have felt at times that I'd run away 
if I could, but it would come to me, 
"To whom shall I go. Thou hast 
the words of eternal life and I be- 
lieve these have. Then why con- 
fuse one another when they all be- 
lieve in Jesus, their Lord. Bro. 
Denny, I'd like to write more, but 
can't write much at a time. My 
fingers cramp. Can't you come 
and preach for us some time? I 
knew your brother, C. F., and loved 
and respected him. I also knew 
your father and respected and loved 
him for his great love and zeal for 
the truth, also your brother, S. B. 
You are truly a blest family. 



102 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



I must stop, I hope you can read 
this. 

Love to all who love the Lord 
Jesus Christ in sincerity. Write me 
sometime if you have time. 

Your little sister in Christ, I hope 
and trust, 

MRS. W. B. WHITLEY, 
601 East Main St., 
Washington, North Carolina. 



COMFORT IN THE LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Bro. Gold: 

I am sending money order for 
$2.00 for the renewal of my sub- 
scription to the Landmark, begin- 
ning Oct. the 29, 1929. I should 
have sent it sooner, but just neglect- 
ed it. I truly thank you for being 
so kind in sending it on to me. I 
find so much comfort and consola- 
tion in reading after the many 
good writers. It is always a wel- 
come visitor in our home. 

May the Lord bless you with your 
work is my prayer. 

Your brother in Christ, I hope, 
N. F. KING, 
Jacksonville, N. C, R. F. D. 3 



APPROVES. 

Elder O. J. Denny, 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Dear Bro.: 

I have read your letter in the 
Feb. 1st. Landmark in regard to a 
home for ministers, and I heartily 
endorse every word you say. And 
as you say I do not think a sufficient 
fund could be raised among our 
people to build such a home and if 
it could be what would support it. 

As I see it if our ministers who 
are serving churches and who are 
faithful to the churches under their 
care and the other ministers that 



do not serve as pastors but go as 
God directs them and preach the 
gospel, in my judgment if such 
preachers are not worthy of some 
help while they are able to go in 
the service they would not be wor- 
thy of such a home even though it 
could be built and supported. And 
I want to say with you, let me live 
and let me die with my dear breth- 
ren and sisters that I love more than 
all this world. And while I am yet 
blessed to serve them in my weak 
way I want to be faithful until 
death and I want to die with them 
and in their fellowship. May God 
bless all of us to live in such a way 
that we may never be a burden to 
our brethren though we may lose 
our usefulness. 

Submitted in love, 

Elder A. B. Denson. 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



92 YEARS OLD 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co.: 

I am enclosing herewith my check 
for one dollar, which please place 
to my credit on subscription list of 
Landmark. And, owing to my ad- 
vanced years, lacking only about a 
month of being 92, I want to ask 
you to kindly stop the paper at the 
expiration of the time this remit- 
tance pays for. While I am in a 
fair state of health, yet, my days 
are in the hands of the Lord and the 
summons cannot be far away. I 
wish to have my worldly affairs in 
a shape to be easily closed up after 
my departure. 

I have enjoyed reading the Land- 
mark. I see references to brethren 
that I have met in the South many 
years ago. That dear old Father 
in Israel, Elder Mitchell, whom I 
met both in the south and also in 
New York where I also met the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



10:J 



founder of the Landmark. These 
with the Hassells, Respass, and 
many others of that day have pass- 
ed into that rest that remains for 
the children of God, and their 
works do follow them. 

May editors and publishers be 
sustained and enabled to continue 
sending the little Messenger of truth 
to those who fear the Lord and trust 
in His mercy, is my humble desire 
and prayer. 

Yours in the blessed hope, 
J. G. GOWIN, 

Springfield, 111. 



LANDMARK LADEN WITH 
LOVE. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend: 

Enclosed please find money or- 
der for two dollars to renew my 
subscription for another year. I 
have been taking the dear old 
Landmark for nine years and I love 
it so much I do not want to miss a 
single copy. 1 nope the good l^ord 
will enable you to keep up the 
good work of printing the dear old 
paper. I never stop till I have 
read it through. 

It is always a welcome visitor in 
my home and full of good news 
from the dear children of the Lord 
and is laden with love. 

Yours truly, 
MRS. H. R. BROWN, 
Hurdle Mills, N. C. 



TAKING LANDMARK 54 YEARS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Please find enclosed $2.00 money 
order for renewal to Zion's Land- 
mark to Jan. 1931. Mr. Gold, I 



enjoy reading the Landmark very 
much. Don't see how I could do 
without it, but can't expect to read 
it much longer, as I am now 88 
years old, and the Landmark has 
been coming to my home 54 years, 
so you see I am among the oldest 
readers. 

So we will close. Hoping you 
and the Landmark a happy and 
prosperous year. 

Yours lovingly, 

MRS. J. S. CLAYTON, 

Roxboro, N. C, R. 4. 

AN APPEAL TO OUR 
SUBSCRIBERS. 

It is very seldom that we make 
an appeal for money to the sub- 
scribers of the Landmark, for we do 
not like to be asking them for 
help, though of course we are en- 
titled to collect what is due us, but 
our expenses are very heavy indeed, 
and there are a great many sub- 
scribers behind. 

The present depression has hit 
us harder than for years, and we 
need every dollar we can collect. 
We are now sending out our state- 
ments, and if we had all that is 
due us, it would help greatly to re- 
lieve our financial embarrassment. 
Do not lay your notice aside, but 
send us all you can on account. If 
you can't send all send part. There 
is probably $5000.00 due on our 
Landmark list, and if we had that 
money it would prove of great value 
to us at this time. It will not be 
hard for you to spare the small 
amount you owe us, and taken all 
together you can appreciate how 
much good the aggregate amount 
will be worth to us. 

JOHN D. GOLD. 



104 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy lathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert —Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIII. No. 7 

Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSON, N. C. FEB. 15, 1930 



DEATH. 

1st. Cor. 15:22. 

Brother E. A. Stanfield of Farm- 
ville, N. C, asks my opinion as to 
death under consideration in the 
above text. I am reminded of El- 
der P. D. Gold, and perhaps should 
say, as he used to say, "That is your 
text, preach it out." 

We have authority, however, for 
this proceedure, since we are taught 
that the people of God oft' spake 
one to another, and we read, "Come 
let us reason together." 

We need more coming together 
in unity, speaking, one to another, 
and not one about another. In the 
North our brethren have what they 
call covenant meetings, and some of 
the most interesting services I have 
ever attended were meetings of that 
kind in which all present were ex- 
pected to have something to say. 

Let us quote the preceding verse 
also. 1st. Cor. 15:21 reads "For 
since by man came death, by man 
also came the resurrection of the 
dead, and then follows the 22nd. 



verse, "For as in Adam all die, even 
so in Christ shall all be made alive." 

We think the death under con- 
sideration, in this text, is not literal 
or corporal death; but death to a 
state of self sufficiency, to self 
righteousness, and this death or 
consciousness of our totally de- 
praved condition, is brought to our 
knowledge, experimentally, when 
Christ, or, perhaps, I should say 
when God through Christ, is reveal- 
ed in us as the Just One, and the 
only justification for poor vile sin- 
ful men and women. 

When we are thus quickened, as 
we read, "You hath He quickened, 
who were dead in trespasses and 
sins, and etc. we are then con- 
scious of the fact that we are dead 
to every way of approach to God, 
save through the applied righteous- 
ness of the Lord Jesus Christ. Our 
prayer becomes a very simple but 
serious one, "Lord be merciful to 
me a sinner." 

This man, Christ Jesus, was born 
of a woman, born of the Adamic 
family, born under the law, or of a 
fallen maternal parentage, and thus 
could say of a truth, from a natural 
viewpoint, "Of myself I can do 
nothing, my Father worketh and 1 
work hitherto." Thus having suf- 
fered with us, He hath purposed 
that His people, also, shall reign 
with Him in triumphant glory, He 
as the head, and the Church of God 
as the mystical body, all made ac- 
ceptable unto the Father through 
His sacrificial death and righteous- 
ness. 

For as in Adam all die, we read 
the first man (Adam) was of the 
earth earthy, the second man, the 
Lord from Heaven, "And as we 
have borne the image of the earthy, 
we shall also bear the image of the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



105 



heavenly. 1st Co. 15:47 and 49. 

We also read that the first man, 
Adam, was made a living soul; the 
last Adam (Christ the first fruits of 
them that slept) was made a quick- 
ening spirit." 1st Cor. 15 :45. Thus 
we feel to say that all of the Adamic 
family, who are quickened into a 
state of spiritual life, have felt the 
death sentence resting upon them 
and that justly so, and that Christ, 
who is iheir life, hath appeared and 
they will apear with Him in glory. 

Yours in hope 
O. J. DENNY. 



THE OFFICE OF A BISHOP. 

This is a true saying. If a man 
desire the office of a Bishop, he de- 
Jreth a good work. 1st. Tim. 3:1. 

It seems from the scriptures and 
also our best historians, that the 
only offices in the gospel church 
i . e those of Bishops and Deacons. 
The title of bishop in the early 
church is synonymous with the 
later title of Elder or Pastor. Surely 
the work of a Pastor is a good work. 
Peter says, "The Elders which are 
among you I exhort, who am also 
an Elder, and a witness of the suf- 
ferings of Christ, and also a par- 
taker of the glory that shall be re- 
vealed. Feed the flock of God 
which is among you, taking the 
oversight thereof, not by constraint, 
but willingly; not for filthy lucre, 
o:it of a ready mind. Neither as 
being lords over God's heritage, but 
being ensamples to the flock." 1st 
Peter 5:1, 2, 3. Then Paul in Acts 
20 when he had called the Elders of 
the church at Ephesus he says to 
them in verse 28 "Take heed there- 
fore unto yourselves, and to all the 
flock, over which the holy ghost 
hath made you overseers, to feed 
the church of God, which he hath 



purchased with his own blood." In 
both these passages we notice that 
the charge is to feed the flock, not 
to lord it over them. I understand 
that in all financial affairs of the 
church that the Deacons are to at- 
tend to them that the ministry may 
be received and give themselves to 
the ministry of the word. This was 
the purpose in the setting apart of 
the first Deacons as we are told in 
the Acts of the Apostles. The El- 
der or Pastors then are not to be 
lords or masters, but ensamples. 
Though they are made overseers, it 
is to feed the church of God. Paul 
to Timothy says, "Take heed unto 
thyself, and unto the doctrine. Con- 
tinue in them: for in doing this 
thou shalt both save thyself and 
them that hear thee." 1st Tim. 
4:16. Now in order that these 
things be done decently and in or- 
der, Paul tells Timothy immediate- 
ly following our text that a bishop 
must be blameless, the husband of 
one wife, vigilant, sober, of good be- 
havior, given to hospitality, apt to 
teach, not given to wine, no striker, 
not guilty of filthy lucre, but pa- 
tient, not a brawler, not covetous, 
one that ruleth well his own house, 
having his children in subjection 
with all gravity. Not a novice, lest, 
being lifted up with pride he fall 
into the condemnation of the Devil. 
Now take notice of the reading of 
the 7th verse. Moreover he must 
have a good report of them which 
are without; lest he fall into re- 
proach and the snare of the Devil. 
Notice again that in all this teach- 
ing concerning the kind of a man a 
bishop should be, he does not say 
that he ought to be thus and so, but 
that he must be as he has said. If 
the churches are always careful to 
see that those upon whom they con- 



10G 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



fer the office of a bishop measure 
up to Paul's standard how easy it 
will be for those who have eyes, to 
set that the office of a bishop is in- 
deed a good work. Can we imag- 
ine anything more beautiful than a 
flock of God, well fed and properly 
instructed in the things of the king- 
dom, dwelling together in love, hav- 
ing confidence in their pastor, and 
caring for him as the scriptures 
direct. He does not lord it over 
them, but studies to show himself 
approved unto God, a workman 
that needeth not to be ashamed, 
rightly dividing the word of truth, 
he does not ask them to take his 
word but to search the scriptures 
to see if these things he is teaching 
them be true, and though men of 
thu world may not believe the doc- 
trine he preaches, they have no evil 
thing to say of him, for he is a man 
of honor, and sincere in his profes- 
sion. He is careful to attend his 
flock and be gentle and tender with 
them so that they feel free to ask 
him any questions that may be in 
their minds. He and his flock are 
one loving family and he studies to 
give them clean food, and that out 
of a clean vessel. If it is necessary 
for him to be away from them for 
awhile he seeks to leave them in 
clean safe hands. Paul says he 
must be apt to teach, not that now 
and then he says something good 
and instructive but that in a general 
way he is a teacher in divine things. 
He watches his people individually 
and purposely drops some handfuls 
for each of them as he sees they 
have need, and having been called 
by the church to serve them on cer- 
tain days and having accepted their 
call he has no right to habitually 
leave them to others. Sometimes 
men who have no charge and very 



little or no gift in the ministry will 
come in and expect to be invited to 
speak, and if they are, they con- 
sume the pastor's time and the flock 
is mortified instead of edified. A 
church should be very careful in 
calling a pastor, to get such an one 
as Paul here describes, even though 
a man may preach well if he has 
not a good report among those that 
are without he will not be a help 
and an honor to them, a true ser- 
vant of God, may have a falsehood 
told on him sometimes, but the man 
who usually has some uncompli- 
mentary report after him, will be a 
hindrance to the success of the 
church. The church wants to feel 
that her pastor is above reproach. 
So when they sit down to listen to 
him they feel sure they are listen- 
ing to a clean man whose profession 
is sincere, one who has been in- 
structed in the things of the king- 
dom of heaven, and therefore brings 
forth out of his treasure things new 
and old. A church and pastor thus 
united in love and walking together 
in the faith of the gospel, will have 
a feeling for each other that they 
will not have for others, not that 
they do not love and esteem other 
gospel preachers, but their pastor 
is to them a friend and brother and 
father, and to him they look for in- 
struction and when they desire to 
be served they want him to serve 
them. "Behold how good and how 
pleasant it is for brethren to dwell 
together in unity." 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



BORN OF THE FLESH AND BORN 
OF THE SPIRIT. 

Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews 
came to Jesus by night, and said 
unto him, "Rabbi, we know that 
thou art a teacher (not the Mes- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



107 



siah) come from God; for no 
man can do these miracles that 
thou doest, except God be with 
him." In reply Jesus paid no at- 
tention, to what he thought would 
compliment the "teacher," but said 
to him, "Verily, verily, I say unto 
thee, Except a man (a human 
being) be born again, he cannot see 
the Kingdom of God. John 3:3. 
Such a marvelous averment he had 
not expected, and then asked, "How 
can a man be born when he is old? 
Can he enter the second time into 
his mother's womb, and be born?" 
He knew about the birth of the 
flesh, but not of the Spirit; and he 
knew the' impossibility of being 
born again of the flesh. Then Jesus 
said, "That which is born of the 
flesh is flesh," that is fleshly, hav- 
ing the life of its headship, Adam ; 
"And that which is born of the 
Spirit is spirit," that is spiritual, 
having the life of its headship, 
Christ. It may be feared that some 
who are born again may be at sea 
in their contention, as they seem 
not to consider the two principles 
in the believer. Whereas there is 
only one in unregenerate. Some 
are charged with believing that 
the old nature undergoes a gradual 
change by the operation of the 
Spirit, until it is transformed, and 
so becomes a new man. But does 
not the believer's experience, as 
well as the teaching of the New 
Testament, teach that in the one na- 
ture he has sin, disobedience and 
death; and in the other nature 
righteousness, obedience and life. 
By generation he received the na- 
ture of fallen, sinful Adam, the 
first man; by regeneration he re- 
ceived the nature of the second, 
Adam, the Lord from heaven. The 
peculiar energies of each nature is 



manifest by the power of warfare. 
Until born again man knows neither 
the power of sin or the power of 
righteousness. Even as Adam be- 
fore he had eaten of the fruit of the 
knowledge of good and evil, had no 
conscience. The infant is incapable 
of sinning after the similitude of 
Adam's transgression, but is a sin- 
ner, being of his nature and off- 
spring. When born of the flesh 
the child partakes of the human 
nature and its adjuncts; and when 
born of the spirit the child partakes 
of the divine nature and its ad- 
juncts. That which is of nature is 
according to the will of man, and 
that which is of the Spirit, is accord- 
ing to the will of God. 

When one pants for God with a 
thirst, and hungry for righteousness 
let him not assume that his old na- 
ture is dead ; for these leadings are 
but the evidence of a new creation, 
the implantation of life by the 
quickening of the Spirit based upon 
the atonement of Christ. His ex- 
perience and the word of truth 
teach him that his depravity is not 
destroyed; for he will often feel 
that he has grown worse instead of 
better; but a feebler display of the 
evil of his old nature is thrown into 
the relief of the new life of faith he 
lives in the flesh. Christ didn't mean 
by being born of the flesh to convey 
the idea to Nicodemus the material 
body simply, but rather that man 
could not produce that which was 
not flesh; that is by nature a child 
of wrath; dead in sins, following 
things produced by the wisdom of 
the world, carnal commandments. 
Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jona: 
for flesh and blood (intellectual 
qualities and refined abilities) hath 
not revealed it unto thee, but my 
Father who is in heaven." Thus it is 



108 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



clear that "that which is born (pro- 
duced) of the flesh is flesh." "That 
which is born of the Spirit is spirit." 
Note, Spirit is repeated : the first is 
the spirit of God the product of the 
Spirit, the creation. Thus man is 
not born over as Nicodemus vainly 
thought that Christ meant, but born 
again; or as Peter expresses: 
"Being born again, not of corrupt- 
ible seed, but of incorruptible, by 
the word of God, which liveth and 
abideth forever." 1 Peter 1 :23. 
Man is only a creature of God until 
born of God. Sometimes it is said by 
certain men that the elect were 
eternal children of God, and in 
eternal vital union with Christ. If 
such theories were true, there 
could have been no necessity for 
the vicarious suffering and death 
of the Son of God, and "born 
again" a non-essential. How could 
God adopt his own into sonship? 
And how could Jesus Christ give 
eternal life to those who had eter- 
nal vital (life) union with Him? 
Jesus came to save sinners, not 
eternal spirits. Man had nothing 
but a carnal sinful nature until 
"born of the Spirit;" then he has a 
spiritual nature. By this operation 
he becomes a believer with two na- 
tures, distinct, separate and antag- 
onistic. If only born of the flesh 
he will assert what he can be, what 
he can do and what he can keep. 
But when born of the Spirit, and 
not blinded by conditional teachers, 
avows that salvation is of the Lord 
— what Christ is, what He does and 
what He keeps. The divinely 
taught believer only has Christ's 
works to glory in. The believer's 
warfare continues during his earth- 
ly pilgrimage ; for he cannot elim- 
inate either principle or nature, 
purify one or corrupt the other; the 



old man is entirely depraved; the 
new man is essentially holy. So the 
former cannot foreslide, the latter 
cannot backslide; but he who pos- 
sesses both natures may so live af- 
ter the flesh as to lose the joys of 
salvation and bring the chastenings 
of the Lord upon him; or if he 
should through the Spirit mortify 
the works of the flesh and in the 
obedience of faith he will be found 
reaping life everlasting while he so- 
journs. "Seeing that ye have put 
off the old man with his deeds," 
said Paul to certain brethren, who 
had so done. Mark, he did not say 
that they had put out the old man 
or improved him. Again, "Ye have 
put on the new man" — manifesting 
the fruits of the Spirit. Who is 
there that cannot see the difference 
in trying to mend an old garment 
and in casting it off, and in putting 
on a new one? It is simply put- 
ting off the old, and putting on the 
new — walking in the spirit and not 
after the flesh. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



ELMA K. SIMPSON 
Please publish the death of my little 
niece Elma Kathleen Simpson, who was 
born May 18, 1926 and departed her life, 
December 22, 1929, age 3 years, 7 mo. 4 
days old. It was hard to give her up, 
but God knew best and took her to live 
with him. She leaves a mother and father 
Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Simpson, two brothers 
Wilbur and Milton, 2 grandfathers, five 
aunts, six uncles and a host of friends to 
mourn their loss. She lived a short time 
after taking her bed. Her suffering was 
very great but no complaint was made. 

Thou art gone our precious Elma 
Never more canst thou return 
Thou shall sleep a peaceful slumber. 
Till the resurrection morn. 

Where I know there will be no more sor- 
row, 

No parting, no sad goodbyes, 
Where we'll ever live with Jesus 
In that land beyond the skies. 

Thou art gone our precious darling, 
Never more can we meet you here, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



109 



But we hope some day to meet you, 
In that land so bright and fair. 

Oh, my precious, precious darling, 
How I miss you none can know, 
But I hope some day to meet you 
On that happy, happy shore. 

Oh our precious baby and child 
How I long to join you there 
In that blessed land over yonder, 
With that happy band of angels so bright 
and fair. 

We loved her, yes we loved her 
But the angels loved her best 
And they have sweetly called her 
To yonder shining shore to be at rest. 

Little Elma has gone from a world of pain 
And we are left to mourn and weep 
For our darling has fallen asleep, 
Sleep on dear one and take thy rest 
For God called you home, He thought it 
best. 

All our days are dark and dreary 
Lonely are our hearts today 
For the one we loved so dearly 
Has forever passed way. 

You are gone but not forgotten, 
Nor shall you ever be, 
As long as life and memory last 
We shall always remember thee. 

Little Elma was to me so dear, 
It grieves me much to see her go, 
But she has gone and left me here 
In this wilderness of woe. 

But when the righteous judge, 
Shall come to summon we away 
I hope with Elma to go home 
To the brighter world of endless day. 

Written by her aunt, 

Miss Ella Short. 



ELIZA KEARNEY POLLARD. 

It is with a felt sense of sadness and 
loneliness that I attempt to write of the 
death of my dear and only sister in the 
flesh. Judging from the evidences of a 
hope in Christ that she often spoke of to 
me during the past twenty-five years, hav- 
ing experienced a hope in Christ about the 
year 1904; and the characteristics demon- 
strated during these years in her daily 
life (namely), Love, joy, peace, longsuf- 
fering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meek- 
ness and temperance, which are fruits of 
the Spirit, I feel assured that she is asleep 
in Jesus. 

"Blessed are the dead that die in the 
Lord, yea henceforth sayeth the Spirit. 
They shall rest from their labors and their 
Works do follow them." 

She often spoke to me of doubts, fears, 
trials, temptations and sorrows, by reason 
of sin and transgression she had to suffer. 



"But if we suffer with Christ, we shall also 
reign with him," said the Apostle. 

From a felt sense of unworthiness, she 
declined to follow her Lord in baptism un- 
til October 14th, 1920, when she came be- 
fore the Church at Mewborn's, asked for 
a home and was received unanimously, and 
baptised in the afternoon by the unworthy 
writer. 

Sister was very much interested in good 
singing and often met with father, bro- 
thers, neighbors and friends to sing the 
songs of Zion. Many times did she go 
with me to my appointments to mingle 
with her brethren and sisters in worship 
of her dear Lord and Saviour. Her motto 
was, "Better to suffer wrong than to do 
wrong " 

Oh, how dearly she loved peace. 

She was born April 29th, 1878 and died 
April 5th. 1929, aged 50 years, 11 months 
and 6 days. In April 1926, she was mar- 
ried to Frank Pollard. She was afflicted 
with high blood pressure for years. About 
the last four months of her life, she suf- 
fered greatly with high blood pressure, 
cancer, and bright's disease, but patiently 
bore it all until the end came. 

Lord, grant that we may all bow in hum- 
ble submission to all dispensations of Thy 
providence and Grace, that we may say 
with Job of old, "the Lord giveth and the 
Lord taketh away. Blessed be the name 
of the Lord." 

W. B. KEARNEY. 



NANNIE L. BUTCHER. 

WHEREAS, in the Providence of our 
Heavenly Father, our beloved Sister Nannie 
L. Butcher was on Dec. 25th., 1929, taken 
from these mortal shores to the bosom of 
her blessed Saviour, we feel assured. 

Sister Butcher was born Jan. 15th, 1866 
being the daughter of Elder David Moore 
of Person County, North Carolina. 

She married John Lunsford who died 
August 30, 1896. On June 7, 1900 she 
was married to Brother J. H. Butcher. 

Sister Butcher professed a hope at eleven 
years of age; joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Surl, Person County, North Car- 
olina in the year 1890, and was baptized 
by her father; later moving her member- 
ship to Malmaison Church, Pittsylvania 
County, Virginia, where she remained a 
faithful member until death. 

Funeral services were conducted from 
the home by Elders D. V. Spangler and C. 
T. Evans, Dec. 26th., 1929. 

THEREFORE, Be It Resolved: 

1st. That in the passing of Sister Butch- 
er the Church has lost a faithful and lov- 
ing member, one who will be greatly miss- 
ed by her Church and who manifested in 
her iife so much that she had been with 
Jesus. 

2nd. That we extend our sympathy to 
her bereaved ones. May God's rich grace 
comfort you with the blessed thought and 
hope that some day we shall meet her be- 



110 ZION'S LANDMARK 



yond the grave where God, with His own 
hand, shall wipe away all tears. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent her family; a copy sent Zion's Land- 
mark and Lone Pilgrim for publication and 
a copy placed on our Church records. 

Done by Order of Malmaison Church, 
Jan. 4th, 1930. 

(Elder) D. V. Spangler, Moderator 
R. S. Williams, Clerk. 



MARY ELLEN AKERS 

Sister Mary Ellen Akers, daughter of Dr. 
D. P. and Caroline C. Heckman, was born 
November 21, 1862, near Calloway, Frank- 
lin County, Virginia, and died November 
23, 1928, surviving her husband eleven 
months and twenty-eight days. She was 
married, December 24, 1878 to Norborne 
Kansas Akers. Unto this union were 
born twelve children, six boys and six 
girls: David N., Virginia, "William E., 
Blanche, Beebe L., Susie, Norborne H., 
C. Thomas, Peter L., Clyde, Mary and Ade- 
laide. All of these are living and married. 

She joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
in the summer of 1889 and was baptized 
by Elder John C. Hall. Joining the church 
early in life, her faith and christian for- 
titude followed her to the end. She was 
devoted to her family, her church and her 
neighbors. This was exemplified by her 
patience and long suffering in rearing her 
large family, all of whom were keenly de- 
voted to her to the end and by the love 
and respect of her neighbors. This was a 
reward richly deserved and appreciated. 
The writer never lost an opportunity from 
his youth to visit Aunt Kitty, Uncle Kans 
and their family. She was motherly and 
kind at all times, displaying humor, even 
temper and good spirit in fortune and in 
distress. 

Her funeral was conducted at the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church in Roanoke, Va., by 
Elders E. L. Blankenship and P. G. Lester 
in the presence of a church full of mourn- 
ing friends and relatives. She was in- 
terred in Evergreen Cemetery by the side 
of her husband. 

Those possessing a hope in Christ, a 
spirit of love and sacrifice, a devotion to 
duty, to neighbors, to church and always 
exerting a conscientious effort to follow in 
the footsteps of their Master and Lord, en- 
ter into eternal life. Her unruffled pa- 
tience in her last illness was characteris- 
tic of her whole life. She was led by the 
still waters. She possessed the comfort 
and assurance of the Master and departed 
peacefully unto an eternal rest. May God 
comfort and protect her bereaved children. 

Written in devotion bv a nephew, 
A. E. AKERS, 

Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 



MRS. FANNIE BUNN. 

It is with a sad heart that I attempt to 
write a few lines in loving memory of my 
dear mother, Mrs. Fannie Bunn. She was 



born in Wilson County, N. C, April 12, 
1861, died November 27, 1929, making her 
stay on earth 68 years, 9 months and 15 
days. She was the only child of Adam 
and Piety Flowers. Married to Alison 
Ruffin Bunn December 10, 1884. To this 
union ten children were born, nine girls 
and one boy. 

She united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Sandy Grove, August 5, 1922 
and was baptized the same day by her pas- 
tor, G. W. Boswell. She lived a faithful 
member, always showing evidence of love 
for the Lord's humble poor. She was a 
kind and dutiful wife, a tender and loving 
mother and a good neighbor. She was 
good and kind to everybody, always ready 
to lend a helping hand to any one in need. 

For six years mother had been afflicted 
with high blood pressure and heart trou- 
ble, but bore suffering with patience until 
the end. The day of her death she was 
active, and while picking up chips as the 
sun was sinking, she suddenly dropped 
asleep in the arms of her beloved Jesus. 
All was done for her that children, hus- 
band and doctors could do, but none could 
stay the hand of death. The all-wise God 
who gives and takes has taken her from 
our midst, and we must stand still and 
know that He is God, and does all His 
pleasure both in Heaven and on Earth. 
Oh, it is so hard to part in death with 
those we love so well. It is heart break- 
ins: to know that mother is gone to be seen 
here on earth no more, but we mourn not 
as those without hope, but feel our loss 
is her eternal gain. 

Funeral services were conducted at 
home by her Pastor George W. Boswell. 
Her favorite songs: "In all my Lord's Ap- 
nointed Ways." and "Sweet Fellowship 
With God." were sung with other selec- 
tions by her brethren. Her body ^'as 
laid to rest in the family cemetery to a waif 
the resurrection morn. She left to mourn 
their loss a lonely husband and invalid 
mother 8 8 years old, and eisht children: 
Mrs. Mamie Strickland. Mr. W. E. Bunn, 
Mrs. Bessie Brantley. Mrs. J. M. Warren. 
Mrs. Luther Davis, Mrs. Carl M. Cooper, 
Miss Sallie Bunn, Miss Bruce Bunn. and 
several grandchildren. 

Written by her heartbroken daughter, 
MISS BRUCE BUNN, 
Spring Hope. N. C. 



MRS. MARGARET -T. TARLTON 

On the night of Dec. 31, 1929, our dear 
mother quietly passed from us into that 
world above. 

She was born March 20. 1867 making 
her stay here nearly sixty-three years. 

About fourteen years ago she professed 
a hope in Christ and joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Jerusalem, was baptised 
by Elder W. C. Edwards, where she re- 
mained until her death. 

She was loved and respected by her 
church, neighbors and friends, and chil- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



111 



dren of which ten survive, six boys and 
four girls. 

After funeral was held by her beloved 
pastor Elder W. C. Edwards, the body was 
laid beside her dear husband who pre- 
ceded her ten years ago to await the com- 
ing of the Lord, when they shall be raised 
and fashioned like his own and know 
nothing but pleasure and love forever- 
more. 

Dear mother, we loved you, 
To try to help you was fond 
Although we could not keep you, 
God called you to that world beyond. 

A Son. 



OCTAVItTs L. EVERETT 

Amid the rapid strides of time, with its 
raging billows of strife, toil, and care, its 
attending conflicts of joy, and sorrow, we 
are again called upon to record the death 
of another one of our members. Brother 
Octavius T. Everett, the son of Jesse 
and Mary Anne Everette was born near 
Hamilton on May 25, 1870 and departed 
this life Nov. 11, 1929, making his stay 
59 years. 5 months, 17 days. His mo- 
ther and father were both faithful mem- 
bers of their church. He with his wife 
was baptized 4th Sunday in Aug. 1924, 
and he was appointed treasurer of the 
church two years before his death. He 
was a good farmer, and indulgent father 
and very hospitable and enjoyed entertain- 
ing his brethren and sisters in his home. 

For several years he had suffered with 
brights' and very high blood pressure. 

He was married to Mattie Miselle, Feb- 
ruary 22, 1898, who with five children, 
Leroy, Wade, Jesse, Herbert and Kath- 
erine survive him. 

His funeral was conducted in Hamilton 
metting house by Elder B. S. Cowin assist- 
ed by Elders John N. Rogerson and W. E. 
Grimes and his body was laid to rest in 
Hamilton cemetery. The numerous floral 
offerings attested the love and sympathy 
of his many friends. 

Done by order of Conference, 
Bettie Salisbury, 
W. E. Grimes, Moderator 
W. A. Ross, Clerk. 



A GREAT MAN AT REST 
Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: Possibly some one has informed 
you of the death of Eld. G. W. Stewart of 
Akron, Ala., which occurred at 5 o'clock 
last Saturday morning. I hope some one 
will write a suitable obituary of this great 
and good man. He wrote "David's Sling," 
you remember, and I think the last thing 
he wrote for religious periodicals was up- 
on "Science," as in "Zion's Landmark." 

Too much cannot be said about him for 
he was one of the most gifted men now 
living in this world. He possessed a great 
treasure, but he knew it was in an "earth- 
en vessel." 



I have many things to write but I am 
not physically able. Eld. Stewart wrote 
me a few days ago when he was able 
lo write only a few lines. 

May the Lord bless us. 

I am your friend, 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 

LaFayette, Ala. 



ASA J. LAWRENCE 

Tt is with a sad heart that we attempt 
to write in memory of our dear husband 
and father, Asa J. Lawrence, Born August 
25, 1856 in Cartaret County, N. C, and 
died November 14, 1929, making his stay 
on earth 73 years, 2 months and 19 days. 
He suffered much with a pain in his breast 
for several years and would say that when 
it reached his heart it would end, and it 
,1id. for he died suddenly. 

On January 13, 1881, he married Nancy 
.T. Lawrence. To this union were born 
three children, two girls and one boy. One 
died in infancy and one died in 1903. He 
leaves myself and son, six grandchildren 
and two great grandchildren, one half- 
brother and sister and a host of relatives 
to mourn our loss, but our loss is his eter- 
nal gain. 

He received a sweet hope in the Lord 
Jesus and went before the church at North 
■River, and related to the church and asked 
for a home with them. The church re- 
ceived him Saturday before the second 
Sunday in June. 1891 and was baptised 
on Sunday by the Pastor, Elder L. H. 
Hardy. In 1897 he was chosen clerk of 
the church and in 1899 he was elected 
collector and treasurer which he served 
faithfully. He loved the brethren and 
was glad to have them visit him. He 
would sav Jesus was his salvation, his all 
in all. He would sing, Jesus My All To 
Heaven is Gone. When he would come 
to the fifth verse he would sing it over 
and over many times. 

The funeral was held at the grave in 
the old family cemetery by Elder W. W. 
Roberts and with many friends and rela- 
tives present he was laid to rest. 

Dearest husband, thou hast left me, 
In this world to mourn and sigh, 
But beyond this world of sorrow, 
I hope we will meet again on high. 

Dearest father, how we miss thee, 
In our humble home below, 
But the Lord of Glory called thee, 
And to Him thou had to go. 

Dearest grandfather how we loved thee, 
No one here on earth can tell, 
But the Lord did love thee better, 
So, we say, dear one, farewell. 

Written by his loving wife, 

NANCY J. LAWRENCE, 

Ottaway, N. C. 



112 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PEMELIA C. WHITFORD 

The subject of this sketch was born 
Feb. 13, 1848 and died Feb. 20, 1929, 
making her stay in the flesh 81 years and 
7 days. 

She was the daughter of Charles Toler 
and Caroline his wife and was married to 
A. P. Whitford on the 3rd day of May, 
1868. 

She professed a hope in the Lord Jesus 
as her Saviour on Saturday before the 
4th. Sunday in September 1896 and with 
two others was baptized the next day by 
Elder. J. S. Corbitt. She was a good 
mother and devoted Christian. May we 
all bow in humble submission to the will 
of Him who giveth and taketh away, bless- 
ed be His Holy name. 

Submitted in love, 

J. P. TINGLE. 



SAMUEL R. ROSS 

He was the son of Elder William A. and 
Harriett L. Ross. He was born Septem- 
ber, 18th., 1867 and died October 14th, 
19 29, making his stay on earth 62 years 
and 26 days. 

Samuel was married twice, the first 
wife being Addie B. Moore. To this union 
was born one child, Earl. His second 
wife was Setta Ward. To this union there 
were five children, one dying in infancy. 
Those who are living are Alfred, Harvey 
Clara and Jesse Ross. 

He confessed a hope in the Lord Jesus 
Christ the second Sunday in September 
and asked a home with the church at 
Briary Swamp on the same day, and was 
baptized by Elder B. S. Cowin. He 
enjoyed the sweet fellowship of the church 
and the glorious doctrine of salvation by 
grace and grace alone, and always filled 
his seat except when providentially hin- 
dered. We feel that with the passing out of 
our brother, he has not passed out of life 
to death, but death to life. We mourn 
not for him as one that has no hope. We 
surely believe that he is resting in the 
sweet paradise of God, from his labors. 

His funeral was conducted the 16th of 
October in the town of Bethel, Pitt County, 
by Elder B. S. Cowin, who spoke very 
comfortingly to his family, and also to his 
friends. 

He was taken to Greenville, N. C, Pitt 
County, and laid to rest in the Cherry Hill 
cemetery, leaving ten brothers and sisters, 
the church, and a host of friends, there to 
await the resurrection morn. 

Written by his brothers, 
G. A. ROSS, 
J. L. ROSS. 



$1.00 FOR ELDER TOPPING. 

Mrs. Dora W. Greenway sends $1.00 for 
Elder Topping, Pantego, N. C, which has 
been forwarded to him. J. D. Gold. 



MOVED FROM ROCKY MOUNT 

Elder T. H. B. Pridgen has removed 
from Rocky Mount to Lucama, Route 
No. 2 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Elder J. E. Herndon will preach as fol- 
lows: 

Durham Tuesday night, Feb. 25. 
Raleigh, Wed. night, Feb. 26. 
Beulah, Thursday 11 a. m., Feb. 27. 
Pittman's Grove, Fri. 11 a. m. Feb. 28. 
Scott's, Sat. & 1st Sun. Mar 1 and 2. 
Contentnea, Mon. 11 a. m., Mar. 3. 
Lower Black Creek, Tuesday 11 a. m., 
March 4. 

Upper Black Creek, Wednesday, 11 a.m. 
March 5th. 

Wilson, Wednesday night, Mar. 5th. 

Upper Town Creek, Thursday 11 a. m. 
Mar. 6th. 

Elm City, Thur. night, March 6th. 

Mill Branch, Fri. 11 a. m. March 7th. 

Falls, Sat. and 2nd Sun., 11 a. m., 
Mar. 8 and 9th. 

Pleasant Hill, Monday 11a. m., Mar 10. 

Tarboro, Monday night, Mar. 10th. 

Lower Town Creek, Tuesday 11 a. m., 
Mar. 11. 

Autrey's Creek, Wed. 11 a. m., Mar 12. 

Meadows, Thursday 11 a. m., Mar 13. 

White Oak, Friday 11 a. m., Mar 14. 

Contentnea, Saturday and 3rd Sunday, 
March 15 and 16. 

Healthv Plains, Monday 11 a. m., Mar. 
17. 

Sandy Grove, Tuesday 11 a. m., Mar. 18. 
Sappony, Wed., 11 a. m. Mar. 19. 



FOR ELDER TOPPING. 

J. E. Jones, Largo, Florida $1.00 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE UNION 

The next session of the Upper Country 
Line Union will be held, the Lord willing 
with the Church at Greensboro, N. C, on 
the 5th Sunday and Saturday before in 
March, 1930. 

The public is cordially invited to attend 
this meeting and especially ministers. 

W. C. King, Union Clerk. 



REPAIR MT. ZION CHURCH. 

Mrs. Cris Hite, route 2, Nelson Virginia, 
writes that Mt. Zion church needs repair- 
ing and there are only five members, four 
male and one female. She states that it 
will cost $150.00 to make the necessary 
repairs and contributions may be sent to 
her. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

We have secured the services of one of 
Wilson's best Eye-Specialists to make our 
examinations this year. There will be no 
extra charge for this service. 

Hours 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. 

Denny Bros. Co. 

S. B. Denny, Manager 

Feb. 15— 2t 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

: AT ~ - 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII. MARCH 1, 1930 No. 8 



AHAB BY HIS WICKED ACTS PROVOKES GOD TO WRATH. 



"And in the thirty and eighth yea.^of Asa, King of Judah began Ahab 
the son of Omri to reign over Israel :£ind Ahab the son of Omri reigned 
over Israel in Samaria, twenty and twc^years. 

And Ahab the son of Omri did evil % the sight of the Lord above all 
that were before him. 

And it came to pass, as if it had been . light thing for him to walk in 
the sins of Jereboam the son of Nebat, tL t he took to wife Jezebel, the 
daughter of Ethbaal, king of the Zidoniai , and went and served Baal, 
and worshipped him. 

And he reared up an altar for Baal in the house of Baal, which he had 
built in Samaria. 

And Ahab made a grove; and Ahab did more to provoke the Lord God 
of Israel to anger, than all the kings of Israel that were before him. 

In his days did Hiel the Bethelite build Jericho: he laid the foundation 
thereof in Abiram, his first born, and set up the gates thereof in his 
youngest son Seg-b, according to the word of the Lord, which he spake 
by Joshua the so. ' Nun." — 1 Kings 16:29-34. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, E(fe> Winston-Salem, N. C. 

? o 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.80 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Zion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the oi^ una new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and frieitds are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if bo 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zton's 3Lan6marfc 

2)evoteC> to tbe Cause of ^esus Christ 



FLESH A MASS OF CORRUPTION 

(From Mrs. Effie H. Carrawan to 
D. M. Vail, 28 Willard St. 
Binghamton, N. Y.) 

Swanquarter, N. C. 
My Dear Brother: 

If I, poor insignificant worm, 
dare claim that holy divine relation- 
ship. Sometimes I dare try, lest 
I be deceived and then, again I hope 
I am one, yet I can't know why it 
is that such a holy rod, a holy royal 
priesthood, a holy nation, as the 
people of God, his church, his bride, 
the Lamb's wife, should take knowl- 
edge of me, for I know if they could 
see me and know me as I do myself 
surely they could not, for I am in- 
deed blackened, steeped in sin, the 
worst of God's creation. And the 
older I get, the more fully this 
truth strikes me. So much so I 
loathe myself, but it is not of self I 
wish to write, for what is self — a 
mass of corruption. I would love 
to bring you some comfort in return 
for your sweet letter to poor worth- 
less me — one that is too sinful of 
your notice. Yet your letter was a 
feast to my soul, as apples of gold 
in pitchers of silver, and did my 
soul good, for you told me of the 
love and power of Jesus, His ability 
to save and does save — oh it is so 
sweet to see eye to eye and speak 
the same thing concerning this 
common faith, this grace, salva- 
tion, sanctification, justification 
and the final glorification of all re- 
deemed family, host of God, and 
every one my dear brother can thus 



speak, for they have been taught 
by the same spirit, led by and in the 
same way, have experienced the 
same trials, and have been made to 
see what hell-deserving worms we 
are. And one of those great and 
grand purposes of God is to bring 
his people by a way they know not, 
and in paths they have never trod, 
and in doing this they are led along 
the same channel and have the 
same way, road to travel. So as 
they meet along this pilgrim jour- 
ney they may be by thus being led 
led to comfort one another by the 
same comfort whereof they them- 
selves are comforted. And in doing 
this they strengthen and build up 
one another in this most holy faith, 
yes living faith, the same faith that 
was once delivered unto the saints 
is given unto us. Yes, all those 
who hear the joyful sound, how 
blessed are those who know the joy« 
ful sound, for they shall walk oh 
Lord in the light of thy counte- 
nance. Yes, wear the approaching 
smile of their God, and he will keep 
them in perfect peace, whose mind 
is stayed upon him, and to whom 
has a sin-soul got to flee to only to 
this God. Whose hope is on and in 
him, and they learn this in the 
Whales College. Yes being strip- 
ped of all self works and self-de- 
pendence, they flee to him in whom 
they trust, and it matters not how 
low they get, how deep down in the 
belly of hell, even where there is 
no standing, yes bottomless pit, 
there they are made to cry, Lord, 



114 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



save or I perish, for there is none 
other to look to and none that can 
help and deliver. Oh have you not 
found him a deliverer, a present 
help in time of trouble. Have there 
not been times that you have been 
cast down so low, that you dared 
not lift up your head, knew not 
which way to turn. Oft times 
when you came before the Lord to 
speak in His dear name, in the de- 
fense of and for the bleeding cause 
of Zion, that you felt you had noth- 
ing to say, was ready to cry out, Oh 
Lord, undertake for me, yes help 
me in this time of sore need. You 
felt empty, lean, barren, shut up, 
cast off as it were — nothing to say, 
yet you knew this people that were 
before you were waiting for some 
food. Yes the gospel of Christ, 
wisdom, power of God. Yet there 
was none. Oh, how >ou recalled 
the former days, when you had 
been blessed with fullness of th« 
spirit, but now all gone, you left 
alone. Oh you just wanted to fly 
away, give it up, but no, that is not 
God's way. You must be weak, 
feel weak, to be strong in the power 
and might of your God. When thus 
brought you get a blessing. Pray 
for me. May God keep you, and 
give you grace as your days de- 
mand. If you feel it will be any 
comfort to any one you may publish 
this in Landmark. 

Effie H. Carrawan. 



ENJOYS READING THE 
LANDMARK. 

Elder S. B. Denny, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Christian Friend: 

I am a subscriber to the Land- 
mark and it surely is a blessing to 
a lonely wandering little sheep in a 
great wilderness of woe. I enjoy 



reading the Christian Experiences 
of others so much that when Elder 
P. G. Lester wrote to us a word of 
encouragement to write our exper- 
ience, I decided that I would try in 
my weak way to write of the won- 
derful revelation which was given 
to me, a very unworthy creature. 
Please do what you think best 
about printing in the Landmark. 

I am trying to remain an humble 
follower of Christ. 

This is intended to convey a small 
portion of what the Lord has done 
for me, if He will guide my pen. 

I was brought up by true Primi- 
tive Baptist parents. I write their 
names, maybe some of the readers 
knew them. My parents were Jesse 
Moody and Margaret Bennett 
Moody. They were both born and 
raised and married in the state of 
Georgia, and came to Florida and 
raised a family of twelve children 
who are all yet living and the 
youngest one is past fifty years of 
age. My parents have been gone 
from the sorrows of this earth for 
many years. It was before my 
mother died that I beoran to feel 
and see that the pleasures and joys 
of this life are only a fable. All 
earthly joys always ended up in 
sorrow, and wherever I would go 
this load of sorrow and disappoint- 
ment went with me. I would try 
to pray but found it true that the 
prayer of a sinner availeth nothing. 

It was about five years that this 
condition grew worse all the time. 
I got so sick in body as well as mind 
that I felt sure that I was going to 
die. The burden grew so heavy 
until I could not walk or even 
straighten my body up under this 
burden.. I started for the bed but 
fell on the floor. I asked my mo- 
ther to pray for me, and she helped 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



116 



me to the bed and began to pray. 
(I can't write this without tears 
blinding my eyes.) I think my 
dear mother had prayed about six 
words, and so well as I can remem- 
ber they were, Oh God, have mercy 
on us, when a streak of light came 
from heaven and spoke the word, 
Jesus right in my heart. Oh, glory 
to Jesus. 

There is not a tongue on earth 
that can tell the joy I felt at that 
moment. My load of sins was gone 
and I had the joy of heaven in my 
heart.. Oh I felt so good. I made 
a bargain with myself that I would 
never sin again. This was done 
about thirty years ago and after I 
had this glorious revelation it does 
seem like I ought to be able to live 
above sin, but it is when I would do 
good that evil is always present with 
me and keeps me fighting evil all 
the time. 

About three years ago I dreamed 
that I had to go through a very 
dark tunnel before I reached eter- 
nal happiness, and some time later 
I dreamed that I was in the dark 
tunnel and had travelled in it all 
alone until I became frightened 
and was tempted to turn back, but 
a thought came to me that I was as 
near to Heaven as I was to where I 
started from and the thought 
cheered me up and I started on 
again toward Heaven and somehow 
the wind blew a curtain out of the 
way and I saw Jesus was right on 
the way with me all the time and I 
had not been able to see him 
through the curtain. I have not 
reached the end of the dark tunnel 
yet. 

I am living at Daytona Beach 
with my daughters and they all have 
membership in a so called church, 



that I can't find Jesus there. My 
membership is in Zion's Rest Prim- 
itive Baptist Church in Jacksonville 
Fla. I don't know of any church 
of our faith and order that is near- 
er than about forty miles, and I 
have no way to go. This is surely 
a dark tunnel I am going through, 
but thank God I remember the 
dream that Jesus goes with me all 
the way even when I cannot see 
him, and I receive a great deal of 
comfort by reading the Zion's Land- 
mark. I hope and pray that God 
will lead me safely home, and if it 
is his will, while I stay on the earth 
I would be glad to have a way to 
make my living where I will be in 
reach of a church. I am past fifty 
five years of age, and have to earn 
my support however I can. I would 
ask the family of God to pray for 
me that I may be strengthened, 
that I may hold out, faithful to the 
end. I believe that God sends his 
children among all kinds of dan- 
gerous seeming beasts and serpents 
to teach them to be humble and to 
trust in him alone. And if I do 
finally get out of this dark tunnel it 
won't be anything good that I have 
done that brings me out. It will be 
Jesus, and he gets all the praise and 
is entitled to more than he gets. 

This is only a short part of the 
ups and downs, losses and victories 
which I have witnessed. If you 
think it worth printing in the Zion's 
Landmark, please correct mistakes 
and print it. I have enjoyed read- 
ing the Christian experience of all 
those who have written. 

Hoping, trusting, watching and 
praying, I remain, 

MRS. ELLA SMITH, 

116 Baker St., 
Daytona Beach, Fla. 



116 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



CONTAINS THE TRUE 
DOCTRINE. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I am coming in late with my re- 
newal to the Landmark which I 
should have sent in before now. 
The dear old paper is a welcome 
visitor in our home and I haven't 
missed but one copy. I hope I be- 
lieve the doctrine it puts forth. It 
contains so many good experiences 
which I love to read so well. As- 
sociation time is drawing near and 
I would be glad to be there. If 
not deceived my desire is to mingle 
in sweet fellowship with the dear 
saints of God. I was blessed with 
the sweet privilege of attending the 
Contentnea Association last fall, 
which was the most pleasure. We 
fell in company with one sister 
Lancaster, and spent the night at 
her home. I am sure they must 
have been some of God's chosen 
ones or they never could have had 
the patience with us.. I've thought 
of these dear people so many times, 
and would be glad to extend to 
them my many thanks. I feel like 
there are so many deeds of kindness 
shown to me I am not worthy of, 
but sometime I am made to feel like 
His goodness and mercy has follow- 
lowed me all the days of my life. 
Goodness because it all came from 
God and He is nothing but good- 
ness, and mercy because all that He 
has bestowed upon me, and in me 
has come without my deserving it. 
I know if I ever have done a good 
deed or act I was prompted of the 
Lord and it was none of my good- 
ness. While I feel like He has kept 
me all the days of my life, He has 
kept me out of so many temptations 
of the devil. 

I also hope the good Lord will al- 
low me to dwell in His house for- 



ever, which I know will be in 
mercy. Hoping the Lord will be 
my guide and protection while on 
the shores of time and be with me 
in the end. Please cast a mantle 
of charity over this poorly worded 
letter, because I am nothing but 
failures. Hoping and trusting with 
all the faith I have the good Lord 
will lengthen the time with you to 
publish the dear old paper to the 
pleasure and joy of so many of 
God's little ones to feed upon His 
word by so many witnesses of his 
great and enduring love, He has 
toward his people. 

Hoping each and every one that 
meets in this association will have 
the pleasure of enjoying it with the 
fullness of his love. 

Mrs. J. G. Gaskill, 
Hobucken, N. C. 



BLESSED TRUTHS. 

Elder O. J. Denny, 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Dear Brother in Christ: 

Yes, Brother Denny, I have al- 
ways enjoyed your articles that I 
have read, and I have loved you for 
the blessed truth's sake from the 1st 
one that I saw. As face answers 
to face in water, so does the heart 
of man to man. The spirit and 
sentiment that I saw in your letters, 
encouraged me to believe that I was 
a child of God. Or in other words, 
you comforted me with the comfort 
wherewith you have been comfort- 
ed of God, that is preaching the gos- 
pel. The teaching and spirit in the 
gospel bears witness with the spirit 
of faith in the hearers that they are 
the children of God. 

I felt very sad after hearing of 
the death of Elder P. G. Lester. I 
had known him to love him. Soon 
after I became a member of the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



117 



church, I received his preaching 
with power and much assurance I 
hope in the Holy Ghost, and consid- 
ered him one of our ablest gifts to 
the church. He was conservative, 
but sound and firm in the doctrine 
of God our Saviour, and could not 
be turned to the right or left from 
what he felt to be the scriptural 
course in the word, either by friend 
or foe. He was established in the 
use of the four sound needs. 

Elder P. D. Gold was another 
that I dearly loved as a noble Chris- 
tian minister of the gospel, able and 
strong in defense of the truth as it 
is in Jesus. God has called them 
to their home above. I will now 
say God bless you and yours is my 
desire for Jesus sake. 

If you have time and feel like it 
write to me. 

Yours in Christian love, 
D. M. VAIL, 

28 Willard Street, 
Binghamton, N. Y. 



EXPERIENCE. 

With God we can do all things, 
without Him nothing. In the spring 
of 1920, I dreamed I was putting 
tobacco in the barn, and I thought 
I had a large crowd helping me, 
and we were all having a fine time, 
talking about what good prices we 
were going to get that fall. 

In the woods just a few steps 
from the barn there was a yellow 
jacket nest in the ground. And the 
yellow jackets were coming out by 
the thousands. They came among 
the people and there were thous- 
ands and thousands of them and 
stung the laboring men and women. 

And there came a wasp nest and 
it was a very large one covered with 
wasps. They came through them 
and made them worse. 



And there came a very large hor- 
net nest, three in one, and came 
through the yellow jackets and 
made them worse, and they came 
out until they covered the face of 
the earth, and they stung us until 
they made us quit the tobacco. 

And I left and went west and I 
saw three piles of snow and they 
were covered up with all unclean 
things of the earth until one could 
not tell whether it be snow or not. 
I walked on to the three piles of 
snow and behold there was a black 
smoke coming out of the top like a 
burning volcano mountain. That 
smoke came out for some time and 
then it ceased. And there came 
three red hot irons like unto rail- 
road tie irons, red hot as fire would 
make them, and during the same 
time while the red hot irons were 
shooting out there came a mighty 
wind and blew every wasp, hornet 
and yellow jacket away, and blew 
all unclean things off those three 
piles of snow and left three piles 
of snow perfect white. And then 
everything was quiet. There was 
not a yellow jacket, wasp or hornet 
on earth. Everything was in per- 
fect peace. 

God Almighty Himself came out 
of the top of the 3 piles of snow, 
Came down about half way and 
stopped. Then Jesus Christ came 
out and came down on the ground 
to dwell with his people for some 
time. Dear brothers and sisters 
read 20th chapter of Revelations. 

"He that has eyes let him see. He 
that has ears let him hear. He that 
has a heart let him understand." 

God bless you all is my prayer 
for Christ's sake. Amen. 

An unworthy brother if one at all 
R. B. SKINNER, 
Wilson, N. C, R. 2. 



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ZION'S LANDMARK 



WILL COMFORT OTHERS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

I have decided as I hope under 
the influence of the good Spirit to 
send to you for publication a good 
letter from a very precious sister, 
Mrs. Mellon Norman of Greensboro, 
without her consent, but knowing 
her as I do, I do not believe she 
would object if she could feel like it 
would comfort others as it did me. 
I have known her for some years. 
She is so faithful to attend church, 
and she is so kind and lovely to the 
dear little ones. May God bless 
her and her family. 

Yours in hope, 

J. R. JONES, 
Rockford, N. C, R. 1. 



Dear Brother Jones: 

When I awoke this morning and 
found the ground covered in snow, 
I thought about you, and wondered 
how you were getting along. The 
postman came at noon and brought 
my Landmark, which is always a 
most welcome visitor. I read your 
good letter and was real glad to 
know that you are residing with 
your loved ones. I know your niece 
is a great comfort to you. I trust 
you are much better ere this and 
you'll continue to improve and will 
soon have regained sufficient 
strength to be with us again real 
soon. We miss you so much and 
your seat looks lonely without you. 
Sister Bertie came out last Sunday. 
We had a lovely visit together. Bro. 
King has an appointement at our 
church Saturday night. I trust I'll 
be able to attend and can receive 
one crumb from our Master's table. 
Unworthily, your sister, 
Mrs. Mellon Norman. 
206 Country Club Drive, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



BEEN PREACHING SINCE 
SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 

My dear friend : 

How thankful I am to you, for 
your interest you have manifested 
in poor me. The donation you sent 
me came in good time, for I am a 
great sufferer and greatly in need 
in every way. I need more medi- 
cal attention for I have spent every- 
thing on earth that I could convert 
into money and left it at the hospi- 
tal. The brethren, and friends 
have helped me in the past and I 
thank them for it, but I am in need 
and ashamed to beg. 

I began in the pulpit when I was 
only sixteen and how it hurts me to 
feel without a change in my condi- 
tion that I will never see the breth- 
ren and friends whom I have been 
interested in for the last sixty two 
years. My love to the brethren 
around you. 

Affectionately yours, 

D. W. TOPPING, 

Pantego, N. C. 



WISHES LANDMARK SUCCESS. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co.: 

I am sending $2.00 for my renew- 
al to Zion's Landmark to Jan. 1931. 
I enjoy reading the Landmark so 
much. About all the preaching I 
hear is through it, as our preachers 
are very scarce in Douglas County, 
Oregon. Having formerly lived at 
Roanoke, Va., I so much miss the 
privilege we had there, the gather- 
ing together of our people. I feel 
that I am traveling all alone and 
without a comforting friend. I 
wish the Landmark success during 
the coming year. 

A sister in hope, 

MRS. ETTA WEIKEL. 
Dillard, Oregon. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



119 



ZIO N'S L ANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy lathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Qlder M. L. Gilbert —Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIII. No. 8 

Entered at the postoffice at Wilaon 
as second class matttr 

WILSON, N. C. MARCH 1, 1930 



ENJOYS THE LANDMARK. 

Elder O. J. Denny, 
Dear Bro.: 

I am enjoying Landmark. Have 
been reading it for 30 or 40 years, 
did stop for awhile a few years ago. 
I have been reading the book of 
Jonah. Want to ask you what you 
think of the expression that Jonah 
had to be cast overboard to keep 
from being drowned. Now let us 
think for a moment, he was on the 
ship, had paid his fare to Tarshish 
but a storm overtook them and the 
destruction of the ship was threat- 
ened and so violent and rough was 
it that the mariners were afraid and 
cried every man to his god, and 
their fear continued so the ship- 
master began to inquire into the 
cause of the trouble and he found 
Jonah asleep in the ship, so he stir- 
red up Jonah to know what he 
knew about it, so they decided to 
cast lots to prove who the sinner was 
and it fell on Jonah who told them 
to cast him over, and all would be 
well with them, and the fiah was 



there ready to take care of him and 
take him to Ninevah. 

As I see it the fish was not pre- 
pared to swallow the ship, but 
Jonah, so he had to meet that fish 
otherwise the ship could not make 
progress, and all their lives were 
threatened with death. Now what 
way could Jonah have gone down 
there, with stronger proof that he 
was sent of God. Would mule back 
or a chariot or anything of that 
kind have done as well? We think 
■aot. 

Now, Bro. Denny, pardon my 
trespassing upon your time for I 
feel you will get nothing out of 
what I write, but I merely want to 
get your views and whoever de- 
sires to comment on it. It speaks 
of God repenting of what he had 
thought of doing and did it not. I 
want that explained for the sake of 
little ones. It does seem that the 
wicked ignorant city, not knowing 
their right hand from their left did 
truly repent. It also seems Jonah 
in some way was displeased with 
the way in which God managed the 
affair. Shall be glad to have you 
write on the subject and to notice 
that God turned from the great fish 
to the little worm that cut down the 
gourd controlling both. 

And should not you find time to 
write through the columns of your 
paper, ask someone else to do so. I 
have heard some of our able min- 
isters say when called on to give 
views, that they had no light on the 
subject, and when that is the case 
I imagine it is a hard task. 

Wishing you a happy and pros- 
perous New Year. 

Your brother in hope, 

R. L. DODSON, 



120 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Mr. R. L. Dodson, 

147 Broad St., Danville, aV. 

Dear Brother: 

Your good letter of recent date 
to hand, which I am passing on to 
the Landmark office for publica- 
tion in the hope that some of our 
able brethren may write you direct- 
ly or through the Landmark col- 
umns, answering your several ques- 
tions. 

I fully agree with you as to the 
purpose of the great fish. It was 
to transport Jonah to the right 
place and on time. 

I note the question you have 
raised as to Jonah having been dis- 
pleased. Are we not all like Jonah? 
Often murmuring at the providence 
of God. The spirit is willing in the 
day of His power; but the flesh is 
weak and our pride is easily wound- 
ed, and the demands of the flesh 
hard to satisfy. 

You have raised a very deep 
question as to God having repented 
of the things He had thought to do. 
I do not claim to know the right an- 
swer to your question ; but God, as 
the author of the Law of Moses, 
which law, like the law of a Median 
and Persian King, could not be 
changed; but must be fulfilled, 
thought as the Law Giver to require 
the full penalty for all iniquity. 

The same God, through Christ, 
became a God of mercy and long 
suffering, to those who justly de- 
served death rather than life. 

God prepared the great fish, to 
meet the ship on which Jonah slept, 
and he was awakened on time, and 
made the proper connection for 
Ninevah. 

Jonah preached the preaching 
God bade him preach. Jonah was 
not prepared to expect anything 
short of the complete overthrow of 
#he city. His pride was wounded 



when he saw God had been merci- 
ful to the city. 

The flesh clamors for punish- 
ment of the wicked. High as the 
Heavens are, so high are God's 
ways above our ways. 

As Jonah watched for the de- 
struction of the city, God gave him 
the gourd that it might be a shadow 
over his head, to deliver him from 
his grief. So Jonah was exceedingly 
glad of the gourd; but the same 
God that prepared the fish and gave 
him the gourd, also prepared a 
worm to smite the gourd and it 
withered. 

The next blessing or trial that 
God prepared for his servant Jonah, 
was a vehement wind that beat up- 
on the head of Jonah, and he faint- 
ed and wished in himself to die, and 
said, "It is better for me to die than 
to live. Who among us has not 
felt the same way at times of great 
trial? Great trial of our faith, as 
well as of the body. 

Jonah, self centered and full of 
self pity, as most of us are, said, "I 
do well to be angry even unto 
death," in answer to God's ques- 
tion, "Doest thou well to be angry 
for the gourd?" 

God then taught him the lesson 
intended. Jonah had pity on the 
gourd for which he had not labor- 
ed, but loved the comfort it gave. 
God had compassion, not on a sin- 
gle gourd vine ; but on a great city 
in which there dwelt six score thou- 
sand souls that knew not their right 
hand from the left. 

God in His wisdom gives to us 
the law which calls for sacrifice 
and offering; but gives instead of 
sacrifice, the oil of joy for the spirit 
of praise as we are made to reign 
unto righteousness through Christ 
the Lord. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



121 



We are given a mixture of joys 
and sorrows, and as we grow older 
we see the earthly picture fade, 
fade and fade away, until the sun- 
light of an eternal day arises in full 
glory never to be dimmed by an 
eternal age. 

Yours in hope, 
O. J. DENNY. 



PREACHING JESUS. 

And Philip opened his mouth and 
began at the same scriptures and 
preached unto him Jesus. Acts. 
8:35. The scripture at which he 
began is recorded in Isaiah 53:7-10. 
The Eunuch was reading this scrip- 
ture and asked "of whom speaketh 
the prophet this? Of himself, or of 
some other man." And Philip be- 
gan here and preached unto him 
Jesus. This scripture was his text, 
or starting point. No doubt he re- 
ferred to many other scriptures be- 
fore he was through. I would think 
that one preaching Jesus to another 
who did not know him would call 
up such scriptures as Gen. 3:15. 
Isa. 7:14 and other prophesies con- 
cerning his coming, to show that 
the Lord had in the former dispensa- 
tions promised a Saviour, and then 
to show that he has come according 
to promise refer his hearer to Matt- 
1:2, Luke 2:5, 6, 7, and then there 
are numerous scriptures telling of 
his word and his work while here. 
Among which are Luke 2:46-47, 
which shows the great wisdom that 
he had even at the age of twelve 
years, which astonished the doctors 
and all who heard him. And then 
he comes to Jordan, unto John to be 
baptized of him. Matt. 3:13. Jesus 
was going to set up his kingdom on 
earth and his would require those 
who believe in him to be buried in 
water as a type of his burial in the 



earth, and so he sets the example 
for them by going down into the 
water himself, and coming up out 
of the water the heavens were op- 
ened unto him. And he saw the 
spirit of God descending like a 
dove, and lighting upon him. And 
lo a voice from heaven, saying, 
This is my beloved Son in whom I 
am well pleased. Matt. 3:16-17. 
And this approval of the Spirit was 
promised by Peter on the day of 
Pentecost to those who asked what 
shall we do? Peter said unto them, 
Repent and be baptized every one 
of you in the name of Jesus Christ 
for the remission of sins and ye 
shall receive the gift of the holy 
ghost. Acts 2 :38. And after Bap- 
tism, Jesus suffered the temptation 
of the devil, showing his oneness 
with his people who when they are 
taught of God realize their weak- 
ness in the suffering of many temp- 
tations, but who are comforted in 
the thought that their blessed Sav- 
iour suffered the same, and there- 
fore is easily touched with the feel- 
ings of our infirmities. There are 
so many evidences in the life of 
Christ that he loves his people not- 
withstanding their weakness and 
sin, and that he has come to destroy 
the works of the devil, and to de- 
liver them from his hateful snares, 
and from the power of darkness, 
that when one is blessed to preach 
him with the Holy Ghost sent 
down from heaven it is calculated 
to stir the hearts of those in whose 
hearts Jesus dwells the hope of 
glory. The Eunuch surely had this 
blessed spirit in his heart, and al- 
though riding along a desert road 
the Lord sent him one to preach 
Jesus to him for it pleased God by 
the foolishness of preaching to save 
them that believe. And Jesus 



122 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



comes to the end of his earthly 
ministry and seals all the promises 
of his father and the stated purpose 
of his coming, with his own blood, 
and rising again the third day a tri- 
umphant conquerer over all the 
powers of darkness, and so plainly 
manifested himself to his disciples 
as to confirm them in their faith in 
him before his crucifixion. Peter 
said that he has begotten us again 
to a lively hope by his resurrection 
from the dead. The proof of his 
resurrection was full and satisfying. 
So that even doubting Thomas, 
when he saw him could say My Lord 
and my God. Jesus, having built 
his church and delivered to her the 
keys of the kingdom, ascended to 
his Father in the full view of his 
apostles, Acts. 1 :9. 

Then the apostles tarried at Jeru- 
salem, as Jesus had told them until 
they were endued with power from 
on high, and after the wonderful 
things that happened on the day of 
Pentecost they went everywhere 
preaching that Jesus Christ is the 
Lord and the Saviour that God by 
the prophets had promised them, 
and they had said that the gentiles 
shall see thy light, and all kings 
thy glory. And these promises are 
being fulfilled in the preaching of 
Philip to the Eunuch. All these 
things Philip must have told the 
Eunuch, and he being taught of 
God believed it, for God did from 
of old visit the gentiles to take out 
of them a people for his name. 
When Philip had baptized the Eu- 
nuch, the Spirit of the Lord caught 
away Philip that the Eunuch saw 
him no more, but he went on his 
way rejoicing. He had had Jesus 
preached to him, it fed his hungry 
soul. He had obeyed him by being 
baptized in his name. Why ihould 



he not rejoice. Dear ones, do we 
not know something of such an ex- 
perience? Then let us who labor 
in word and doctrine endeavor al- 
ways regardless of what scripture 
may be our text, to preach Jesus, 
whether we preach to one or a mul- 
titude, leaving self and all of man's 
merit and notions out of it, and then 
shall we feed the flock of God. If 
we preach as Christ and his apos- 
tles did we shall have the approval 
of Jesus, our lawgiver and Saviour, 
and also the loving fellowship of 
his humble followers. Can you tell 
its worth? 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



GRACE. 

In the school of Christ His peo- 
ple all learn that it is the "grace of 
God that bringeth salvation" to the 
heirs in their every state and condi- 
tion. Grace is often defined as a 
free favor. May not a person be in 
dire need of one hundred dollars, 
and a friend may supply him by 
gift or loan, but the grace of God 
is more than a favor — it is Christ, 
life, heaven; yea, everything for 
nothing — not for mere favor. A 
learned religionist, whose parents 
were Primitive Baptist, once said to 
me, he believed as the Primitives 
do in doctrine, except in the way 
they hold God's election, and in 
that he said they were wrong. He 
said, "It is characters that were 
chosen in Christ before the world, 
and not creatures of Adam's race. 
If that were true, characters pos- 
sessed credit and merit, and then 
the reward would be recovered; 
"not of grace, but of debt." — Rom. 
4:4. 

Election is either grace or works, 
which? 

If God elected the character, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



123 



then man must put himself into that 
state, which he has not by nature 
in order to become that pure char- 
acter. Primitives believe what 
Paul taught in Rom. XI :5, 6: "Even 
so then at this present time also 
there is a remnant according to the 
election of grace. And if by grace, 
then it is no more of works: other- 
wise grace is no more grace. But 
if it be of works, then it is no more 
grace; otherwise work is no more 
work." It is not expected that the 
unregenerate can receive this truth 
in the love of it, but believers do re- 
ceive it, and praise and glorify God 
in their bodies and spirits, which 
are His. "Of His fullness we 
all have received, and grace for 
grace." The grace that was given 
them in Christ before time they re- 
ceive in time. Thus they were 
saved purposely before time by the 
Father; on the cross they were mer- 
itoriously saved by the Son; and 
they were saved vitally by the Holy 
Spirit when they were born again 
and received the atonement. As 
to the assurance of salvation, Paul 
declares: "God is able to make all 
grace abound toward you; that ye 
always having all sufficiency in all 
things, may abound in every good 
work." 2 Cor. 9:8. Again, "My 
grace is sufficient for thee." 2 Cor. 
12:9, which indicates that it is not 
of man, then it would be doled out 
as a mere pittance. What a rich 
treasure house that the prayer of 
faith may receive, but can never 
exhaust. With knowledge of such 
energy and power, Paul would en- 
courage the saints to "work out 
your own salvation (not by good 
works and obedience but) with 
fear and trembling: for it is God 
(not an external cause) which 
worketh (at the time of doing) 



both to will and to do of His good 
pleasure." Phil. 3:12, 13. In the 
same vein, Peter writes, "To them 
that have obtained like precious 
faith with us through the right- 
eousness of God and our Saviour 
Jesus Christ: grace and peace be 
multiplied unto you through the 
knowledge of God and of Jesus our 
Lord, according as his divine power 
hath given unto us all things that 
pertain unto life and godliness 
through the knowledge of him that 
has called us to glory and virtue." 
2 Peter 1:1, 2, 3. 

The word gives full assurance to 
the saints that "all grace," "all suf- 
ficiency," "in all things" for their 
salvation, also the cause of obedi- 
ence, good works, spiritual worship, 
preservation and resurrection to 
eternal glory. 

While grace has abounded in all 
generations, the fountain is still 
full, and be assured there will be 
no depletion in the age everlasting. 
As we see and feel our insufficiency 
in ourself for anything, may we be- 
hold His "all sufficiency in all 
things for us. In Him plenteous 
grace is found for all our circum- 
stances, situations and conditions; 
in famine and in plenty; in war and 
in peace ; in sunshine and in storm ; 
in health and in sickness; in life 
and in death. Sufficient grace for 
the young and enough for the old; 
the same grace that saves the infant 
is that which saves the father and 
mother. Grace to drink the bitter 
cup and grace to drink the cup of 
joy; grace to pray and grace to 
praise; grace for duty and grace 
in duty; grace for each day's ser- 
vice. Grace first, grace last, and 
grace all between. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



124 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



THOSE WHO HEAR. 

"Behold I stand at the door, and 
knock: if any man hear my voice, 
and open the door, I will come in to 
him and will sup with him, and he 
with me." — Rev. 3:20. 

We do not believe that men and 
women in nature are qualified to 
knock at this door as some would 
have you believe. As you will note 
the 6th verse says, "He that 
hath an ear, let him hear what the 
Spirit saith unto the churches." 

The scriptures were written by 
men of God as they were moved by 
the Holy Spirit, and are addressed 
to the living and not the dead, for 
the dead know not any thing. Jesus 
said. Behold I stand at the door and 
knock, if any man hear my voice 
and open the door, I will come in to 
him. You must be made alive in 
order to hear His voice, or to be en- 
abled to knock at this door, as 
Jesus is the door. 

Men and women in nature know 
not the voice, of our Beloved as, He 
says "My sl eep hear My voice, and 
they follow Me and I give unto 
them eternal life, and they shall 
never perish, neither shall any man 
pluck them out of My hand. And a 
stranger will they not follow, but 
will flee from him; for they know 
not the voice of strangers." 

Jesus was addressing the church 
and not the world at large as we 
find again in John 7:37, "In the 
last day, that great day of the feast, 
Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any 
man thirst, let him come unto Me, 
and drink." It is only those that 
thirst after righteousness that are 
bid to come. 

How sweet it is to believe that 
God in His covenant with the Son 



did embrace the poor, the needy 
and even those that are afar off, for 
He says, "the promise is unto you 
and to your children, and to all that 
are afar off, even as many as the 
Lord our God shall call." 

It is not the preacher that calls, 
for when we were yet without 
strength, in due time Christ died for 
the ungodly. God begins the work 
in the heart of a sinner, and if not 
then we are all in the gall of bitter- 
ness and in the bonds of iniquity. 

I believe every true Primitive 
Baptist will agree with me when I 
say Christ must be first and Christ 
must be last in the salvation and 
redemption of the church of the 
living God. If we are agreed that 
it requires life to produce action 
and grace to produce good works 
as we are taught to, "work out your 
own salvation with fear and trem- 
bling, for it is God which worketh 
in you both to will and to do of His 
good pleasure. Then why not en- 
deavor to "lay aside every weight, 
and the sin which doth so easily be- 
set us, and let us run with patience 
the race that is set before us, look- 
ing unto Jesus the author and fin- 
isher of our faith ; who for the joy 
that was set before Him endured 
the cross, despising the shame, and 
is set down at the right hand of 
the throne of God." "Do all things 
without murmuring and disputing." 

May we ever live in such a way 
that when we come to depart this 
life we may hear that voice as it 
speaks to us, saying "Come ye bless- 
ed of My Father, inherit the king- 
dom prepared for you from the 
foundation of the world." 

Submitted in love, 

S. B. DENNY. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



125 



MRS. LAURA ELIZABETH GAY. 

If has been my intention for months to 
send to you. for publication in the Land- 
mark, a little article on the life and death 
of my mother-in-law, Mrs. Laura Elizabeth 
Gay. For various causes this matter has 
been postponed. However, as "it is never 
too late" to do the right thing, I shall en- 
deavor at this time to jot down a few 
facts that may be of interest to those who 
had the pleasure of knowing her, either 
personally, or by reputation for Godliness. 

Laura Elizabeth Carlisle was born in 
Edgecombe County, N. C, on July 8, 1852. 
Her father having passed away in her 
early childhood, her rearing was left en- 
tirely in the hand of a devoted self-sacri- 
ficing mother, Grace Carlisle, a North 
Carolinian by birth and raising. 

Very early in life, Laura exhibited 
characteristics that gave proof of strong 
intellectual power, and her indomitable 
determination to surmount difficulties was 
most marked. I have been told by a 
friend of her childhood, that upon one 
occasion her teacher remarked concerning 
her, "It seems impossible for me to assign 
the child a lesson that she cannot learn." 

The fierce struggle between the states 
raged in the youthful days of my mother- 
in-law, and, she, like so many others who 
came into the world just prior to that 
time, was deprived of educational advan- 
tages. Nevertheless, she availed herself 
of every opportunity that presented itself, 
and not only mastered much that was 
"in the books" but also many useful arts 
and things worth while. She delighted in 
history and biography, and almost to the 
end loved to recall incidents recorded up- 
on their pages that had impressed her in 
early life. 

The ease, grace and expedition with 
which Laura accomplished the tasks of 
youth were examples to all her associates, 
and, I am also told, that when anything 
requiring special care and skill was to be 
done, such as an unusual dress to make, 
or an elaborate quilt to be designed, she 
was invariably called upon for advice and 
aid, which she readily and willingly gave. 

As promising as was the mentality of 
this dear little girl, her spiritual nature 
was also early in evidence. She has told 
me that as a very young child, she delight- 
ed to hear the old people converse upon 
the love, mercy and greatness of God and 
His wonderful gift of the Saviour. She 
hever tired of listening to the sweet ex- 
periences of grace as told by those who 
had felt their sins forgiven. Many a time 
has she told, me of the deep impression 
left upon her by these things. Nor, do we 
wonder that some such sweet experience 
' ccame her own to comfort and sustain 
h r r all along life's weary road. 

No. we did not belong to the same 
church or denomination, and neither did 
wo think alike upon all righteous sub- 
jects, but we both felt that we knew God, 



and had felt the application of the atoning 
blood of His dear Son to our sinful hearts. 
What more was necessary for sweet com- 
panionship? 

"Blest be the tie that binds 
Our hearts in Christian love. 
The fellowship of kindred minds 
Is like to that above." 

Mother Gay told me that at the age of 
thirteen years, she joined the Methodist 
Eni -copal Church, to which denomination 
I belong. Not feeling at home within its 
fold, she later became a devoted member 
of the Primitive Baptist Church, to which 
she was steadfastly true the rest of her 
life. Elder William Bell baptized her in 
June, 1873. 

I wish I could tell you her beautiful ex- 
perience of grace just as she told it to me 
so many times. While I am not able to 
do this in every detail, I think I can at 
least let you have a tiny idea of it: It 
seemed that late on a gloomy afternoon 
she was sitting alone in a large room in 
her country home. She was feeling so 
unhappy, and miserably counting herself 
like St. Paul of old, "the chief of sinners," 
when all of a sudden the blessed Saviour 
appeared at her side. Just what He said 
to her at first, I do not recall, but when 
she had told Him of her yearning to be a 
Christian and follow Him and her failing, 
feeble efforts, He said to her, "All your 
righteousness is as filthy rags," and she 
beheld herself clad in filthy rags. She 
fell at His precious feet crying for help. 
He very gently raised her and said. "Now 
behold yourself, my child," and she was 
clothed in spotless white. Just what be- 
came of the filthy rags, she did not know, 
but she did know that they were gone. 
When the Lord was leaving her and she 
begging Him to remain, He said to her, 
"My dear child, I must leave you now, but 
my grace shall be sufficient for you." 

The days and weeks following the vision 
or experience were the very happiest of all 
she had ever known. In after years clouds 
arose on numerous occasions as she quietly 
journeyed along life's highway, but they 
never quite obscured this bright vision of 
faith. 

On January 10, 1875, Laura E. Carlisle 
was happily married to George W. Gay of 
Edgecombe County, N. C. The ceremony 
was performed by Elder Thomas O'Berry. 
To this union there were born two sons, 
William Dempsey and George W. 

The greater part of their married life 
was spent in Scotland Neck, N. C, where 
both the boys were born. During this 
time and for many years thereafter, my 
mother-in-law was a devoted member of 
Kehukee church. 

She was always a great lover of her 
home and domestic duties, and few calls 
other than those to service for her friends 
and attendance upon divine worship at 



126 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



her church attracted her from this realm. 
As a most devoted wife and mother, she 
spared no sacrifice to herself in order that 
her precious boys might have the best ad- 
vantages to prepare themselves to face 
the problems of life. It was her earnest 
desire to see them well educated and set- 
tled in useful manhood. 

When Dempsey and George had both 
completed the highest courses of study 
that their native town offered, in order 
that they might have greater opportuni- 
ties, and at the same time keep them un- 
der her loving watch care, she left her 
loved home and friends in Scotland Neck 
and came to Richmond, Va., to live. Here 
her worth was soon realized and many 
friends were added to her already lengthy 
list. Here, too, the boys both completed 
their higher education, William Dempsey 
graduating in law at Richmond College at 
the age of nineteen years, and George W. 
graduating in medicine at the University 
College of Medicine, at the age of seven- 
teen years. The latter still holds the 
record as the most youthful graduate in 
medicine in the United States. 

The boys both took up the practice of 
their respective professions in the city of 
Richmond, and from the beginning success 
seemed assured. 

In February, 1905, William Dempsey 
married Julia Clare Bishres of Richmond, 
Va. To this happy union one son, George 
III. was born. On Dec. 27, 1908, Demp- 
sey died. His widow and son, a student 
of the Medical College of Virginia, still 
survive. 

Dr. Geo. Gay has built up a large and 
successful practice in the city where he 
takes high rank in professional and civic 
circles. 

For many years there was no Primitive 
Baptist Church in our city. This fact was 
a great cross to Mother Gay. From time 
to time preachers of the faith would visit 
us and hold services which pleased her 
very, very much. It was always a great 
delight to her to attend a meeting of the 
Baptists whenever or wherever it was 
held, and she would go if it were possible 
for her to do so every time one was held 
anywhere in the vicinity. 

Naturally of a hospitable temperament, 
her cup of joy seemed filled to the over- 
flowing when Primitive Baptist friends 
would come to see her. They never came 
too often nor stayed too long in our home. 
I learned to love many of them, too, and 
was pleased to do my bit to help her en- 
tertain them. I shall never forget Elder 
Andrew Moore, pastor of Kehukee Church. 
He used to visit us often, and a dear old 
soul he was, too. I have heard him 
preach many a time and enjoyed what he 
had to say regarding the Holy Word. I 
believe that today, having crossed "over 
the river," he is sweetly resting "under 
the shade of the trees" in that beautiful 
land. 



My mother-in-law was deeply interested 
in the establishment of a Primitive Bap- 
tist Church in the city of Richmond, and 
gave liberally of her time, means and 
energy to bring it about. After the 
Church here had become a reality, she 
placed her membership with it. I feel al- 
most as if the pretty little sacred edifice 
that stands on West Twenty-eighth Street, 
Woodland Heights, is a silent tribute to 
her devotion to the cause, which it so un- 
assumingly represents. 

Mother Gay was ill for four years. Most 
of the time she was confined to her bed, 
and what she suffered, we can never know. 
All that medical skill and love could do 
to alleviate her pain was graciously done. 
It was a grief to us all that we knew noth- 
ing else to do for the one so near and dear 
to us. On the evening of Jan. 27, 19 28, 
the Death Angel entered our home and 
gently whispered to its queen, "It Is 
enough. Come up higher." And she 
left us so sad and lonely— Pa, Dr. Gay, 
George III, ("Little George") and me. I 
cannot tell you just how heavy is the loss 
we have sustained — you may faintly Imag- 
ine it. 

On Sunday afternoon of Jan. 29, 1928, 
we gently laid all that was mortal of my 
dear mother-in-law to rest in her section 
in beautiful Oakwood cemetery, by the 
side of her precious darling, Dempsey. 

On the side of the family stone that 
faces her resting place, you will read these 
words, 

"Laura Elizabeth, wife of George W. 
Gay. Born July 18, 1852. Died Jan. 27, 
1928. Rest in peace." 

And yet, and yet, with the eye of faith 
I can see her happy and free from pain, 
safe in our Father's house of many man- 
sions in "that city that hath foundations, 
whose builder and maker is God." 

"So long Thy power hath blest me, sure it 
still 

Will lead me on, 
O'er moor and fen, o'er crag and torrent 
till 

The night is gone. 
And with the morn thou angel faces smile, 
Which I have loved long since, and lost 
awhile! " 

With many kind wishes for all readers 
of the Landmark, I am, 

Sincerely, 

JULIA B. GAY. 
2720 East Broad St., Richmond, Va. 



SISTER BENNA PERRY 

The subject of this notice is sister Benna 
Perry who was born Dec. 11, 1887 and 
died Oct. 5th, 1929 making her stay on 
earth 41 years, 9 months and 24 days. 

She was the youngest child of Deacon 
Dempsey Perry and Belinda, his wife, who 
both preceded her to the grave several 
years ago. She leaves brother and sisters, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



127 



and a host of nephews and nieces, together 
with many friends to mourn their loss, but 
we feel sure that our loss is her eternal 
gain. 

She professed a hope in a loving Saviour 
on the 4th Sunday in June 1906, together 
with sisters Ella Perry, Lilly Perry and 
Leah Perry and were all baptized into the 
fellowship of the church at Kitty Hawk, 
N. C. by the pastor Eld. E. E. Lundy. 

Sister Benna and her oldest brother, 
Henry Perry, kept and lived at the old 
home of their parents and it was their 
chief delight to entertain the Primitive 
Baptist when they could do so. 

She became afflicted during the last 
years of her life and a mental derange- 
ment of her mind followed, so that she 
had to be confined in the State Hospital 
for her own safety, where she finally died 
the day and date above written. 

The church in conference requested the 
undersigned to prepare a suitable notice of 
her death to be published in Zion's Land- 
mark, which is hereby respectfully submit- 
ted in love to all concerned. 

J. P. TINGLE. 



ELDER B. L. TREECE. 

"Blessed in the sight of the Lord is the 
death of His saints." 

Benjamin L. Treece was born in Stanly 
County, North Carolina on the 4th day of 
May, 1868 and died at his home in same 
county and state on the 4th day of Febru- 
ary, 1930, aged 61 years and nine months. 
Elder Treece is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Lottie Treece, and six sons and two daugh- 
ters, as follows, Robert Treece, Travis 
Treece, Clarence Treece, Mrs. Delia Man- 
tooth, Ausby Treece, Marshall Treece, Mrs. 
Minnie Thompson, and Levy Treece. and 
also seventeen grandchildren, one brother 
and six living sisters, together with other 
relatives and friends who all keenly feel 
the sad bereavement, but we all are sure 
that our loss is his eternal gain. A little 
less than thirty years ago, brother Treece, 
after having been convicted and fully con- 
vinced of his condition, as a sinner in the 
government of God, having shed tears 
in sorrow and grief, the Lord revealed to 
him His mercy and loving kindness and 
removed the heavy load of sin and guilt 
and blessed him with a most bright and 
precious hope in Jesus Christ our Saviour. 
Later, or about twenty seven years ago, he 
went before the church at Mountain Creek 
and related a wonderful and touching ex- 
perience, and was joyfully received and at 
his request, baptized Sunday following by 
Elder Walter C. Edwards. Elder Treece 
was the first person to be baptized by El- 
der Edwards. Brother Treece soon began 
to preach and for the last twenty five years 
has been actively engaged in serving 
churches in Stanly and adjoining counties. 
His preaching services have always been 
interesting, comforting and gladly receiv- 
ed. Never knew or heard of a true Prim- 
itive Baptist, but what loved and enjoyed 



his preaching. Elder Treece, while sound 
and firm, was most companionable, kind 
and considerate. He was clear of jealousy, 
and preferred others before himself. A 
father in Israel has fallen, but his life and 
the fruits of his labors will live on in the 
mind and hearts of those who so intimate- 
ly knew and loved this precious man of 
God. In his last sickness, he prayed the 
Lord to reveal to him beyond any doubt of 
his happiness in the world beyond and sev- 
eral days before his death, the Lord show- 
ed him to his full satisfaction of his eter- 
nal peace and joy in heaven and he re- 
peatedly told his family, brethren and 
friends, that he was going home to God 
to die no more. Then he would say "I 
know it is so." He was perfectly resign- 
ed and willing to go and only a few days 
before he died, he called his son to raise 
him partly up in bed, and then and there 
preached one of the sweetest and most 
soul stirring sermons of his lire and pro- 
nounced the most awe inspiring and far 
reaching and heavenly benedictions ever 
falling from the lips of man. There was 
a room nearly full present including most 
of the immediate family and several others 
and all were in tears. Thus was ended 
his consciousness, or nearly so, of earthly 
things but around him was a band of an- 
gels, who when death came accompanied 
his Spirit to God who gave it. Peace to 
his ashes. 

Brother Treece was carried to Mountain 
Creek, his home church and there in the 
presence of a vast throng of people, fun- 
eral services were devotedly conducted by 
his fellow ministers, namely Elders J. A. 
Eudy, H. S. Williams, W. C. Edwards, D. 
S. Jones and Oscar Broom, all of whom 
spoke so beautifully and touchingly of the 
life and character of our dear departed 
brother, after which his six sons bore his 
casket to the churchyard cemetery and 
his face is now hid from our sight, but God 
is the keeper who will later resurrect and 
re-unite soul and body. Then dear brother 
Treece and all the ransomed of the Lord 
shall enter that celestial city and ever be 
with the Lord. The family have the ut- 
most sympathy of all who knew brother 
Treece. They certainly were devoted and 
kind to him, as he often told this writer, 
in his last days, that his people had surely 
been good to him. May the dear Lord 
bless and comfort Sister Treece and his 
children is our humble prayer. 

J. W. JONES, 

Peachland, N. C. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT FOR 
BROTHER S. S. FRAZD3R 

1st. In the death of Brother Frazier we 
feel that the church has sustained a great 
loss. 

2nd. It is hard to give up those we 
love though it is better to depart and be 
with Jesus than to dwell here in pain and 
affliction. We beli«v« our loss is his gain.. 



128 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



3rd. Therefore we wish to submit to the 
wise dispensation of God's providence and 
hope to meet him in heaven where all is 
love. 

4th. That a copy of these resolutions be 
recorded on our church book, a copy sent 
to the family and a copy to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication. 

Done by order of conference January 
meeting, 1930, at Roxboro, N. C. 

Elder J. A. Herndon, Mod. 
F. D. Long, Clerk. 



SKEWARKEY UNION 

The next session of the Skewarkey 
union is appointed to meet with the 
church at Spring Green, Martin County on 
the fifth Sunday in March, Friday and 
Saturday before. The introductory ser- 
mon will be delivered by Elder J. C. 
Moore or Elder J. L. Ross. 

All lovers of the truth are invited to be 
with us. 

R. A. BAILEY, Union Clerk. 
Robersonville, N. C. 



BEAR CREEK PRIMITIVE BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION. 

The Forty-Sixth Spring Session of the 
Bear Creek Primitive Baptist Association 
is to convene at Deese Chapel Church in 
North Wadesboro, Anson County, N. C, 
commencing on Saturday before first Sun- 
day in May, 1930. Deese Chapel is located 
just north of Seaboard Airline overhead 
bridge near station, about one mile from 
hard surface road No. 20 at Wadesboro. 
We have regular bus line from east and 
west of Wadesboro and also from Albe- 
marle and Norwood north. Also trains 
from Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Hamlet 
and Florence, S. C, to Wadesboro daily. 
Those intending coming by rail or bus 
notify brother M. T. Harward, Wade Mill, 
Wadesboro, N. C, and he will see that you 
are cared for. 

J. W. JONES, 

Association Clerk, 
Peachland, N. C. 2t 



THE EASTERN UNION 

The Eastern Union is to be held with 
the church at Bethlehem in Tyrrell County 
to commence Saturday before the fifth 
Sunday in March. The church is about 
three miles from Columbia, N. C. Those 
who come can take No. 90, the highway 
to Columbia. We hope to have all the 
brethren and sisters visit us and enjoy 
the meeting. 

A. W. AMBROSE, Clerk. 



LOWER COUNTRY LINE UNION. 
The next session of the Lower Country 
Line Union will be held, the Lord willing 
with the Church at Dutchville, in Durham 
County, N. C, on the 5th Sunday and Sat- 
urday before in March, 1930. 

The public is cordially invited to attend 
this meeting and especially ministers. 

A. P. CLAYTON, Union Clerk. 



BLACK RIVER UNION. 

Editors Zion's Landmark: 

Please announce in the Landmark that 
the next session of the Black River Union 
is appointed to be held with the church at 
Hickory Grove meeting house in Johnston 
County, N. C, on the fifth Sunday and 
Saturday before in March, 1930. The 
church is located about 7 miles east from 
Benson, N. C. All peace loving Baptists 
are invited. 

W. V. BLACKMAN, Clerk. 

Benson, N. C, R. 2. 



UNION MEETING AT WILLOW SPRINGS 

The next session of the Angier Unloa is 
appointed to be held with the -Church at 
Willow Springs, Wake County, Saturday 
and fifth Sunday in March, 1930. Elder 
T. F. Adams has been chosen to preach 
the introductory sermon, and Elder E. C. 
Jones is alternate. 

Willow Springs Church is located about 
one mlie east from Willow Springs, a sta- 
tion on Norfolk & Southern Railway. 

All lovers of Truth are invited to meet 
with us, especially the ministering 
brethren. 

W. F. YOUNG, 

Union Clerk. 

Angier, N. C. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 
We are requested to announce the 
change of address of Elder T. H. B. Prid- 
gen from Rocky Mount, R. No. 4 to Lu- 
cama Route No. 2. 



UNION NOTICE. 
The next Staunton River Union, the 
Lord willing, will be held with the Union 
Church, ten miles North of Chatham, near 
Red Eye. All lovers of truth are invited, 
especially ministers. 

W. R. DODD, 

201 Broad St., Danville, Va. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
We have secured the services of one of 
Wilson's best Eye-Specialists to make our 
3xaminations this year. There will be no 
sxtra charge for this service. 
Hours 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. 

Denny Bros. Co. 

S. B. Denny, Manager 



DO NOT SEND CURRENCY IN LETTERS 
Please do not send currency in letters 
in remitting for Landmark. It is liable 
to be abstracted from the letter in transit, 
or lost in the mails. The best way is to 
remit either by check or money order. 

J. D. GOLD. 



SONG BOOKS WANTED 
I want to buy 25 (Lester & Durand) 
Hymn and Tune Books for Bush Arbor 
Church. Any one having same for sale 
will kindlv let me hear from them. 

W. C. KING, 

Union Ridge, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

= AT — = 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIII. MARCH 15, 1930 I No. 9 

" _______ 

*<% 

THE RAVENS FEED ELIJAH. *%. 

y h. t 

* 4 ^ 

"And Elijah the Tishbite, who was of the inhabitants of Gilt--', : <i 
unto Ahab, as the Lord God of Israel liveth, before whom I stand, \.V .« 
shall not be dew nor rain, these years but according to my word. 

And the word of the Lord came to him saying, Get thee hence, and 
turn thee eastward, and hide thyself by the brook Cherith which is be- 
fore Jordan. 

And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have com- 
manded the ravens to feed thee there. 

So he went and did according unto the word of the Lord: for he went 
and dwelt by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan. 

And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and 
bread and flesh in the evening, and he drank of the brook. 

And it came to pass after awhile, that the brook dried up, because 
there had beeii no rain in the land. 

And the word of the Lord came to him saying, Arise get thee to Zare- 
phath, which belongeth to Zidon, and dwell there: behold I have com- 
manded a widow woman there to sustain thee." — 1 Kings 17:1-9. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.#0 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Z ion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and irim ds are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 

truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zton'e Xanfcmarfc 

©evotefc to tbe Cause of 3esus Gbrist 



THE DAWN. 

(By Morte H. Craig) 
Orion, the hunter, doth boldly climb 
The steeps of the heavens, serene 

and sublime; 
But up where the portal* of day 

open wide, 
Sweet Venus, the herald of morn- 
ing doth ride. 
Socn far in the east faint flushes of 
light 

Are driving in haste the pall of the 
night, 

And across the deep heavens the 

streamers of day 
Are dimming the stars in the great 

Milky Way. 

In glory the monarch of light now 
appears, 

And strikes from our hearts all our 
doubting and fears; 

How splendid the peaks with their 
crimson crown 

When he from his throne in the 
sky looks down! 

Each flower he touches with scep- 
ter of gold 

In its homage looks up and its leaves 
unfold. 

On the breast of the sea the waves 
leaping high 

Strive to catch the first glance of 
his mighty eye, 

And the forest and field, the moun- 
tain and plain, 

Wear the rich royal robes of purple 
again. 

How tenderly heaven thus smiles 
on her world, 



When the mantle of darkness once 
again is furled! 

Thus often we stagger through 
sorrow and pain 

To dawn of our hope and to morn- 
ing again; 

Thus often with crucified Faith on 
the cross 
We suffer in darkness and mourn 
our great loss, 

'Till wakened we see in the gray 
light of dawn, 

The sepulchre open — its great stone 
withdrawn. 



PRAYER. 

(By Morte H. Craig.) 
When God upon our thought at- 
tends 

'Tis then the prayer to heav'n 

ascends; 
Upward as easy as a dove 
On pinions of His strength and love ; 
But oh, how sad when in the night, 
Forsaken by His guiding light, 
Weary and sore, we've upward trod 
Striving to reach the throne of 

God— 

The stone or pitfall in our path 
Disclosed by lightnings of His 
wrath. 



AN EXPERIENCE. 

To my beloved brethren and sisters 
in the Lord Jesus Christ, Greetings : 
I will try to write a short sketch 
of my past life together with what 
I hope has been the dealings of God 
unto this poor sinner. 



130 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



I am the oldest son of Calvin B. 
and Malinda A. Jones, was born 
July 8, 1886. It was my parents' 
desire from my earliest recollection 
that I would observe the moral law. 
They taught me to be sober, truth- 
ful and honest and to always keep 
good company. 

I have tried to observe this teach- 
ing of my kind parents. Even now 
I am made to remember my mo- 
ther's advice, nevertheless she has 
been dead for over twenty years. 

I remember back in my boyhood 
days that a boy came to our home 
in company with a man who was at 
that time a minister. This boy was 
small and was a member of the 
Primitive Baptist Church. I re- 
member that I would look at him 
and wish I was a good boy like he 
was, but I felt so mean that I did 
not see how that God would favor 
me as he had this little boy. 

Some time after this — I can't tell 
it might have been a year or so — I 
retired as usual and went to sleep 
in my usual manner with a clear 
mind, so far as knowing that I was 
a sinner. But in the slumbers of 
that night I feel like (and I believe 
He did) God came to me and show- 
ed me how great a power He had. 

I dreamed that it was Judgment 
Day and I was brought before Him 
to be judged, being the last one of 
our family of five. He (God) was 
sitting on His throne with His back 
to the east and His face to the west 
and in front of him was drawn a 
cord about the size of a sewing 
thread. This cord was drawn due 
west and upon the right hand side 
of this cord were a people dressed 
in white. They looked as though 
they were at ease and enjoying with 
pleasure the place where they were 
at. While on the left hand side of 



this cord was a multitude of people 
dressed in many colors. These 
people were not like the others. 
They were not at ease nor content 
with the company they were in. 

Now was the time for me to be 
judged by Him who doeth all 
things well. 

In my dreams I thought that my 
father, mother and brother and 
aunt were placed on the right hand 
side and as each one was assigned 
to their position they became dress- 
ed immediately. Now I was led be- 
fore God by the Spirit, and in my 
dream I was not placed on either 
side but I was left standing, beg- 
ging for mercy, seeing my natural 
family enjoying the pleasures of 
heaven and I a cast-away, and I 
awoke in tears and my cries awoke 
my brother who was sleeping by 
my side and he asked me what was 
the matter. 

Now this dream has never left 
me. Even now it is clearer to me 
than the next day. My kindred 
friends, I feel that this was God's 
way of showing me that I was a 
sinner. 

About th\s time there was a man 
preaching in our country that I was 
drawn out to. Why I can't tell, but 
I enjoyed his preaching and I loved 
him for some cause. I would read 
the Landmark and Bible and got 
very much comfort. 

Now while I was coming along 
through those days, I was growing 
older and begun to go around with 
my boy and girl friends and as I as- 
sociated with them I could see that 
I was drifting farther in sin and my 
dream would present itself to me 
and I would meditate upon it for a 
clearer understanding. 

T will state just here that I have 
always loved the doctrine of elect- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



131 



ing grace and reverenced it as the 
only way to worship God. 

I always had a love for music, es- 
pecially the violin and as I began to 
get up in my teens I began to learn 
how to play and I would attend all 
the parties in my community and 
engage in fiddling and dancing 
which was a pleasure to me, but 
ever now and then I would remem- 
ber the things of the past and I 
would have serious thoughts. I 
would go to Middle Creek and hear 
Elder J. A. T. Jones preach, but I 
couldn't see how I could give up my 
violin and parties and young friends 
and live with those old people. So 
I began to look around and I knew 
of some people in my community 
who played the violin that were 
members of other denominations. 
So I began to go to other churches 
to hear preaching. May I state 
just here that while my mother was 
not a member of any church (I be- 
lieve she had a good hope) I was 
taught to observe the teachings of 
the Primitive Baptists. However 
she did not object to my going to 
other churches, and while I would 
attend the different churches and 
Sunday Schools, the young people 
and the old were very kind and 
courteous to me, were glad to see 
me come and asked me to come 
again. 

I began to place in my mind that 
I could follow these people and be 
recognized in the Christian world 
and at the same time affiliate with 
the world in a way that I would 
gain popularity. It was my ambi- 
tion in early life to attain unto 
higher ideals and I couldn't see 
where the Old Baptists afforded 
any opportunities but rather took 
them away, for I could no longer 
play my violin and curse a little 



when I was vexed. I couldn't con- 
tinue with my secret orders. So I 
would go to their meetings and go 
to the mourner's bench, from time 
to time and at the same time I 
would attend the Primitive Baptist 
church also because there was 
where my love and desire was. But 
by this time I had done so much 
that I knew that I was not fit to tell 
so good a people as they were that 
I ever loved them. I would try 
to pray to God that He might have 
mercy upon my soul, but I got no 
relief. My prayers would only 
stay around my head. I would 
continue this way for some time and 
I would find myself back engaging 
in my same old traits for a season, 
until I had got so hardened that I 
felt there was no relief for me. 
About this time I got married and 
entered in the pleasures of life and 
as my wife at that time was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church, it was 
my duty to carry her to her meet- 
ings. 

And as I journeyed along in this 
way I got farther and farther away 
from the doctrine of men. After I 
got married I began to read my 
Bible more and I believed more and 
more in the doctrine of electing 
grace. But, oh! not for me. I 
could go back to my dreams and I 
could see that my lot was with the 
ungodly and the sinner. I would 
go with my wife to her protracted 
meetings and I would beg God to 
have mercy upon me and bring me 
into His fold. But it seemed he 
would cast me farther away. Oh ! 
how vile I was. My prayers were 
no good, only to add to my misery. 
Seasons would come and go but my 
condition was no better. I was 
fast coming to the place to see that 
popularity was not profit to poor 



132 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



lost condemned sinners such as I. I 
had got to the place that I would 
try to keep the law, I would try to 
do more good deeds than bad ones 
so that God would notice me, but 
alas, I worked out of tools and tim- 
ber and had nothing in my hands 
to offer for a sacrifice for sin. The 
more I begged the farther I got 
from the love of God, the thing I 
most desired. 

I began to slice off the things 
that I once admired. First I dis- 
carded protracted meetings for I 
could not find any comfort there. 
While my friends seemed to appre- 
ciate my presence and would ask 
me to join with them, but it seemed 
I could see and feel myself drawing 
away from them. Oh! my longing 
and desire was that I might be fit to 
live with God's people, but when 
I was permitted to look within my- 
self I was full of dead men's bones, 
not fit to even sit under the sound 
of their voice which was the great- 
est pleasure of my life. 

Now I made another slice off 
the idol of my day, secret orders. I 
was drawn away from the idols of 
men so I bid the halls of secret 
adieu. 

Now my burden began to bear me 
beneath the earth almost. I felt 
that if I could not get relief that it 
was useless for me to live. While 
curing tobacco one night I dreamed 
I was led into a body of water so 
wide that I could not see the shore 
and there I was baptized by some 
one that I could not recognize. I 
felt some relief for a season. 

Now my mind was drawn more 
to the church, the pillar and ground 
of truth. I could go to preaching 
and it looked like it was all for me 
and as I would rejoice over the 
good things that I had heard and 
the other things that I felt I could 



vouch was the truth the tempter 
would come along and would show 
me what I was — how vile and un- 
clean and prone to sin and that I 
could not even keep the law. Then 
I would be brought back as low as 
ever. 

I remember one time that I was 
complaining in my mind with an 
impression I had to go to the church 
and I was setting forth the facts 
that I was unclean, unsound and 
full of putrifying sores and that I 
was not fit for this place, and some- 
thing spoke to me as they did to 
Peter upon the house top, these 
words, What God hath cleansed 
call not thou common or unclean. 
So as I journeyed along I had two 
other props that had to be taken 
from me and that was my profanity 
and my violin. While I had, it 
seemed, a love for both of these they 
must go as the others have. I got 
to the place I could not stand to see 
my violin hanging on the wall and 
I gave it to my neighbor boy and he 
carried it away and I began to no- 
tice the profanity had gone also. 

Now I was drawn for some reason 
unknown to me to go to the church 
and tell them that I had a love for 
them and wanted to live with them. 
So I made a vow that I would go 
the next meeting day, so as time 
drew nearer and nearer I felt more 
of my unworthiness and prayed God 
that if he would but just give me a 
little more evidence that I wouldn't 
feel so unfit for I didn't know 
whether I had ever been delivered 
from my sins or not. So as I arose 
from my bed the next morning 
these words of the poet came to my 
mind, 

Come we that love the lord, 
And let pur joys be known, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



133 



Join in a song of sweet accord 
And thus surround the throne. 

Dear reader, I never will forget 
this morning. The sun shone as 
it never shone before. Oh! how 
beautiful everything looked. All 
nature seemed to be praising God, 
and as I journeyed to church it 
seemed if I had ten thousand ton- 
gues I could not praise His name 
enough, and on my way to church 
I came in company with Bro. Jones, 
and before I knew what I was doing 
I was telling him my feelings, which 
met with his admonition as to what 
my duty was. So after preaching 
and in the opening of conference I 
made a vow that I would not go to 
the church, but when they closed 
conference they sang the hymn that 
was revealed to me that morning 
and I could not retain my position, 
but before I realized what I had 
done I was trying to tell them 
something of what I hoped God 
had done for me and that I believed 
I loved them with an everlasting 
love, and I was received into their 
fellowship and was baptized the 
next day, which was the second 
Sunday in May, 1914, by Elder J. 
A. T. Jones. I never will forget 
•how I felt that morning when I left 
home. I took a saw mill path so 
none of my former companions 
would see me going to the water to 
be baptized. When I arrived at 
the water for baptism and the 
brethren began to shake hands 
with me and call me brother, how 
little I did feel. I felt if they could 
only see me as I could they would 
not permit me to live with them, 
and when Bro. Jones took hold of 
my arm and started towards the 
water, Oh! the feeling that came 
over me, tongue cannot express. I 
felt as though I was being carried 



upon the gallows and just a few 
more minutes and I would pass out 
of this world. 

After being baptized we went to 
church and Elder J. A .T. Jones 
preached from the 23rd Psalm, very 
beautifully and after preaching 
came the communion and as I sat 
there and partook of the bread and 
wine in memory of Him who died 
that I might live and as I looked in 
the crowd in the house I saw my 
father and oh! how I felt, for I 
knew that he knew how mean I was 
and there I was seated with the 
people of God commemorating the 
death of the Lord Jesus Christ. The 
next week began to be one of joy 
and peace. Oh ! I was filled with 
joy unspeakable. My soul was re- 
joicing in God my Saviour, until 
some time during the day Wednes- 
day while ploughing something 
spoke to me or my mind was im- 
pressed with the following words: 
Go ye and preach the unsearchable 
riches of Jesus Christ unto the Gen- 
tiles. 

At this instance I was brought 
down. I was made to feel that it 
was impossible for me to speak in 
the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. 
The more I labored under this bur- 
den, the more I saw myself in an 
unprepared state. However I 
could get up before a body of peo- 
ple and debate most any subject, 
pro or con. But now I was con- 
fronting the most serious proposi- 
tion that ever approached me, and 
as I labored I began to pray for 
more evidences that I might not be 
mistaken in this sacred and solemn 
undertaking. I would have dreams 
of baptizing people and preaching 
and these would continue to present 
themselves to me. I would ponder 
all these things up in my mind and 



134 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



as I prayed to be relieved of this 
burden the more it pressed upon 
me. I never told any one of my im- 
pressions even my companion. I 
wanted this burden to leave me and 
let me live in the church as a lay 
member. 

One day in July of the same year 
I started off in a hurry to attend to 
some business and met Bro. J. B. 
Sauls about a mile from home and 
he started to talk to me and I told 
him I didn't have time to talk, that 
I was in a hurry, and he said, Sit 
down I have something to tell you. 
He sat down in the middle of the 
road and began to ask me ques- 
tions all of which I would answer 
him in the negative, at the same 
time knowing that I was not telling 
the truth and as we were talking 
he said he had a dream about me. 
He said he saw me go into a large 
field of wheat with the greatest 
cradle that he had ever seen and I 
laid my hat to one side and began 
to cut wheat the greatest that he 
ever saw any one. He said that I 
would have to preach some time, 
for in his dream it was shown him 
that in my cutting wheat that it was 
a type of my preaching and as we 
sat there and talked until the bells 
began to ring for dinner and we 
parted and each went his way 
home. I did not go where I had 
started but returned back home 
with my heart heavier than before. 
Now, dear reader you might think 
that this would have lifted me up 
but oh, how little it made me feel, 
for I had been trying to put this 
burden aside and not ever tell any 
one and yet the Lord had shown 
it tc my brethren. As I labored 
day by day and day in and day out 
for four months, so the 2nd Satur- 
day in September 1914 1 brought 



Bro. Jones part of the way back 
home and I told him some of my 
feelings and how I had been im- 
pressed to speak but hoped it would 
soon go away. He said that he 
would tell the church the next 
morning for me, and I told him not 
to and if I didn't feel any better by 
next meeting he might tell them. 
So I spent another month begging 
the good Lord to remove this or 
give me more evidence. 

On the second Saturday morning 
in October 1914, we met as usual 
and after singing a few songs be- 
fore preaching, and time came for 
preaching to start Bro. Jones arose 
to his feet and said, Brethren and 
sisters from what Bro. Jones has 
been telling me of late he feels im- 
pressed to speak and I want to ask 
the church to let me take him as 
Bro. Wilson did me, up in the stand 
to start with and there was a move 
and a second and not a single vote 
against the request, and as we went 
into the stand they sung the hymn, 
"Cast down but not destroyed." I 
never will forget that song. Every 
time I hear it sung it carries my 
mind back to that October morning. 
I tried to tell the brethren some of 
my feelings and why I was before 
them trying to speak. It seems 
that is about as far as I have ever 
gotten. Many a stormy season has 
been before me from that morning 
until now, many has been the times 
when I have stood before the peo- 
ple and tried to speak and it seem- 
ed that I was only a failure. While 
I feel like I have been blessed a 
few times in my feeble effort to 
point Jesus as the Way, the Truth, 
and the Life, to a perishing and 
dying world. 

Yet as I look back over the past 
14 years that I have been trying to 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



135 



preach the unsearchable riches of 
Jesus I can view many valleys that 
I have passed through. And as I 
came along in my poor way, trying 
to speak, I was liberated to the cor- 
responding churches to speak, and 
sometime after this the church gave 
me license to preach where ever the 
Lord gave me liberty, and after 
speaking for some time the church 
of my membership asked for my 
ordination that I might be qualified 
to assist Brother Jones who was get- 
ting old and feeble. And the sec- 
ond Sunday in I was or- 
dained to the full work of the gos- 
pel ministry by Elders J. A. T. 
Jones and G. William Stephenson. 
This was a solemn occasion for this 
poor worm of the dust. 

I feel that I have been unprofit- 
able in many respects to the Church 
yet how could I live without her pro- 
tecting arm over me. She protects 
me from the storms, shelters me 
from the rains, clothes me with the 
raiment of love, peace and tender 
mercies, shields me from every foe. 
It is a resting place for the weary, 
strengthens the weak, it's food to 
the hungry, comfort to the poor and 
a prison to the rich. 

And while I have been permitted 
to live in her borders for nearly 15 
years and filled every position in 
her borders, serving as assistant 
clerk, as clerk, as deacon and at 
present trying to serve as its pastor, 
yet I have nothing to boast of feel- 
ing to be the least one of her mem- 
bers, trusting that I am at their 
feet desiring their prayers that I 
might be kept by the power of God 
to go in and out before them in an 
orderly manner 

I will stop just here and await 
until the future to write some more. 

Now to my sons and daughters, 



May Gods' rich reigning grace keep 
you from falling and bless you to 
see some day as I trust He has 
caused your father. 

Now may His grace keep us and 
all the true Israel of God, forever 
and ever. Amen. 

E. C. JONES. 



THE SWEET MUSIC OF THE 
GOSPEL. 

Editor Landmark and 
Dear kindred in Christ: 

I want to write to you, as many 
of you know that I was sick during 
our October Associations. I was 
greatly improved in December and 
January, but now am suffering 
much, probably from the nerves 
near the heart. I will probably be 
in some hospital soon. 

Some of you know that I am a 
lover of singing. I have not been 
able to sing since last September, 
but have felt the joys of listening 
more than ever before. The music 
of the voice reaches my soul and 
often lifts me above earthly mat- 
ters. Singing to me is close akin 
to the sound of the gospel and 
reaches the same heavenly chord 
and makes me rejoice. There is a 
secret in it that I can't tell, but 
them that fear the Lord know this 
secret. I have felt that I wanted 
to write Elder Stanfield and tell 
him how sweet his voice was to me. 
To you all I can say there is some 
good in being sick. I have sweet 
meditations in the goodness of the 
Lord to me. I often feel his pres- 
ence and whether I live or whether 
I die, I know it is His will and is all 
right. 

Saturday was the second quarter- 
ly I have missed since my thirty 
years of membership and most of 
this time clerk of the church. I de- 



136 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



sire our love ana fellowship and if 
it is God's will I'll be well and meet 
you again. 
In love, 

H. L. BRAKE, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



READING LANDMARK 53 YEARS 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Gentlemen: 

Enclosed you will find a check to 
renew my subscription to the Land- 
mark from October 1, 1929 to'Oct. 
1st., 1930. You will please change 
the name now, from Mrs. E. J. 
Hardee to the name of J. S. Ed- 
wards, since my poor old sister in 
the flesh, passed away twelve 
months ago, June 1st, 1929. And 
if not asking too much of you, will 
you correct a mistake I saw in her 
obituary some time ago. I can't 
remember what month, but it read 
that she joined the Primitive Bap- 
tist church August the 13th 1929, 
and should have been Aug. 13th., 
1892. I was waiting to see if the 
one who wrote it would detect it 
and have it corrected, but as yet I 
haven't found it to be so. Hoping 
the good old Landmark may con- 
tinue on and that I may be able to 
take it as long as I live. I am now 
near 68 and have been reading it off 
and on since I was 15 years old. 
I'm not a member of any church, 
but, I hope, have always been a be- 
liever in the doctrine it puts forth, 
for I never have believed in any 
other doctrine I have ever heard 
or read of from my earliest child- 
hood. While I have no other evi- 
dence to give, I'm just selfish 
enough to believe, if it were pos- 
sible, that I could hear every other 
doctrine proclaimed at the same 
time, or could hear every other 



preacher the same day, and if there 
was an old Primitive Baptist among 
them, I believe I could tell him from 
all the rest, because he would give 
God all the honor and all 
the glory and cut poor puny 
man out of it all, like he deserves 
to be. I am only a poor helpless 
sinner, to be saved by grace, if 
saved at all, unworthy, but I hope 
a true believer in the true and liv- 
ing God. 

Yours truly, 
J. S. EDWARDS 
Greenville, N. C, Route 5. 



ENJOYS THE LANDMARK. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Enclosed find check for subscrip- 
tion for another year to Zion's 
Landmark, which I enjoy reading 
so much. I feel like I can't get 
along without it. It does me good 
to read the Landmark and know all 
are in peace one with another. A 
little of my experience comes to me 
right now that I would like to re- 
late. The Sunday morning I join- 
ed the church I never shall forget. 
When I rose from my seat I don't 
remember walking up to the pulpit. 
The first thing I knew I was stand- 
ing right in front of the preacher. 
The preacher said to me, have a 
seat. I felt like I couldn't wait till 
next meeting to be baptized, which 
was a month off, so was baptized 
that afternoon. When we were 
going in the water the preacher 
said to me three times, don't be 
scared. I did not realize what he 
was saying until the third time. I 
felt like I wasn't in his hands. 

My uncle said to me when we 
came out of the water, don't you 
feel good? I always said if ever I 



ZIOWS LANDMARK 



197 



joined the church I hoped the Lord 
would take me there. Also when 
I married I wanted the Lord to be 
with me there. I thought after I 
came out of the water all my trou- 
bles were ended, but I found out 
the following week. I have been a 
member of the Baptist church 48 
years. However, it doesn't seem 
that long. I am just as anxious to 
stay with them now as the day I 
joined. This song comes to my 
mind frequently: 

How sweet the name of Jesus 
sounds, 
In a believer's ear; 
It soothes his sorrows, heals his 
wounds, 
And drives away his fear, etc. 

Mrs. N. D. Gurley, 

Pikeville, N. C. 



ELDER SUTTON PLEASED. 

Dear Elder Gilbert: 

I want to say I appreciate very 
highly your editorial on the text: 
"Many are called, but few are 
chosen." I feel that the present 
editors are keeping the Zion's Land- 
mark well up to its standard of effi- 
ciency. I will renew my subscrip- 
tion in January. I am well, but 
am closed in for the winter. 

The grace of our God be with you 
and yours, 

F. M. SUTTON. 
Garden City, Kansas. 



LIKES THE LANDMARK 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

You will find enclosed a check 
for $4.00 to pay my past dues on 
the Landmark and please continue 
it as far as it will. I am sorry I 
am so far behind. Hope you will 
forgive me for my neglect as I have 
been sick so much I hardly know 
when my subscription expired. I 



don't want to be without the Land- 
mark as we haven't had any 
preaching at our church at Provi- 
dence Island City, Ky., for about 
two years as our pastor Elder L. H. 
Bowlin moved to Oklahoma, and 
Elder William Wilson, our assistant 
pastor, died. So we are left with- 
out any preaching. I hope all the 
brothers and sisters will pray for 
the good Lord to send us preachers 
to preach for us that our little 
church may prosper and we may be 
fed with gospel food. Pray for 
your unworthy sister, if one at all 
who feels to be the least of all. 

NANCY J. SHEPHERD, 
Island City, Ky. 



HELPING OUT. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Friend: 

You will please find enclosed 
$4.00 check for the Landmark. 
Think I am behind one year. I 
wrote a letter to send a few days 
ago, but have not sent it off. Re- 
ceived my paper today and after 
reading it and seeing your appeal 
to the subscribers, stating that they 
were many of us behind with our 
paper so much so that it amounts 
to about $5,000.00. Now brethren 
and sisters this makes me feel sad 
to think that we being members of 
the Primitive Baptist church, the 
setting up of Christ our Lord, 
should become so negligent as to 
cripple the dear old Landmark like 
we have. Now let us all go to 
work and pay this out. We that 
are due let us do this for the sake 
of the dear old church if nothing 
else. 

Your brother in the Lord we hope 
Zach Stephenson. 
Hugo, Oklahoma. 



i:;8 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remuve not the ancient Landmark 
which thy tathers have set." 

Editor 

ilder U. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. G. 

Associate Editors 
Klder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Kla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore Md. 



VOL. LXIII. No. 9 



Entered at the postoftice at Vfilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C. MARCH 15, 1930 



THE HEART MOVES MAN. 

"Man speaketh out of the abun- 
dance that is in his heart." We are 
glad to have our brethren express 
themselves through the Landmark. 

O. J. D. 
LaFayette, Ala. 

Eld O. J. Denny, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
My Dear Brother: 

You express my views exactly on 
the home for disabled ministers. It 
would prove a failure and a shame 
upon Primitive Baptists, if any one 
of them starves among those for 
whom he has labored. I can see 
more for the one starving than I 
can for the ones who will suffer 
such a thing in their midst. What 
yoke is it spoken of in Acts 15:10, 
"Which neither our fathers nor we 
were able to bear"? 

I am, yours to serve, 

(Elder) J. F. Satterwhite. 



WHAT IS THE YOKE SPOKEN 
OF IN ACTS 15:10. 

(Question by Elder J. T. Satter- 
white of LaFayette, Ala.) 

We feel that Elder Satterwhite 
is our superior and he could answer 
this question better than we can 
do, however, acknowledging our 
lack of great ability, we are willing 
to give our opinion. 

Great dissension arose between 
the apostles and their followers, 
true and false disciples, touching 
the necessity of being circumcised 
and the keeping of the law of 
Moses. Some said to the brethren, 
"Except ye be circumcised after 
the manner of Moses, ye cannot be 
saved." 

There rose up certain sect of the 
Pharisees which believed, saying, 
that it was needful to circumcise 
them, and to command them to 
keep the law of Moses, and it was 
due to these contentions, that the 
Apostles and Elders came together 
to consider the matter. Acts 15:6. 

We read with interest, the Bible 
account of this council. It was not 
unlike such councils in this age. We 
read, "And when there had been 
much disputing, Peter rose up and 
taught them that God had made 
choice among them, that the Gen- 
tiles, by his mouth, should hear the 
word of the gospel and believe, and 
that God, knowing the hearts, bear 
them witness that, the Holy Ghost 
was given to the Gentiles even as it 
had been given to the Jews, and 
had put no difference between Jew 
and Gentile, purifying their hearts 
alike, by faith, purifying their 
hearts by the imputed righteousness 
of the Lord Jesus Christ, and not 
by outward forms and customs, 
such as circumcision and the keep- 
ing of the law of Moses. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



139 



To those who were still insisting 
on the outward performance and 
the keeping of the law, Peter 
(though a Jew by birth) said "Now 
therefore, why tempt ye God, to 
put a yoke on the neck of the dis- 
ciples, which (yoke) neither our 
fathers nor we were able to bear?" 
Acts 15:10. But we believe (said 
Peter) that through the Grace of 
the Lord Jesus Christ, We (the 
Jews, chosen of God) shall be 
saved, even as they (the Gentiles). 

We now have and perhaps will 
always have those among us, from 
time to time, Who having begun in 
the spirit, are inclined to contend 
that we must be made perfect by 
the flesh, or would entangle the 
saints with this same yoke of bond- 
age to the law that Peter had in 
mind. 

Paul said to this same class, "If 
the inheritance be of the law, it is 
no more of promise;" and he con- 
tinues by saying, (in substance, just 
what Peter said to this Council) 
"There is neither Jew nor Greek, 
there is neither bond nor free, there 
is neither male nor female; for ye 
are all one in Christ Jsus, And if ye 
(Jew or Gentile) be Christ's, then 
ye are Abraham's seed, and heirs 
according to promise." Gal. 
3:28-29. 

It is interesting to note that Paul 
was one of that council which re- 
ported to the distressed saints, as 
follows: "Forasmuch as we have 
heard, that certain (Ministers) 
which went out from us have trou- 
bled you with words, subverting 
your souls, saying, Ye must be cir- 
cumcised and keep the law; to 
whom we gave no such command. 
It seemed good unto us, being as- 
sembled in one accord, to send 
chosen men unto you with our be- 



loved Barnabus and Paul, men that 
hazarded their lives for the name 
of the Lord Jesus Christ," and the 
crux of the message was "For it 
seemed good to the Holy Ghost and 
to us, to lay upon you no greater 
burden, than these necessary 
things: That ye abstain from meats 
offered to idols, and from blood, 
and from things strangled, and 
nam fornication; from which if ye 
keep yourselves, ye shall do well. 
Farewell." Acts. 15:24-28. 

Circumcision, though not exclus- 
ively a Jewish rite, was an emblem 
of purity. The bible notice of the 
rite describes it as distinctly Jew- 
ish. Paul was a Jew by birth, and 
circumcised in conformity to Jewish 
custom, still he, and others, as- 
sumed toward circumcision an atti- 
tude of absolute hostility, so far as 
the rite or custom, of being circum- 
cised, being necessary to salvation 
or the possession of any religious 
or moral worth. 

Though Paul, and the Council, 
wrote as above, to the distressed 
Gentile brethren of whom demand 
was being made, conveying the 
glad tidings that they were not to 
be held as unworthy for not submit- 
ting for circumcision or to the keep- 
ing of the law, we find that after 
this Council had held its meeting 
and recorded its liberal attitude to- 
ward those who were not circum- 
cised, he (Paul himself) circum- 
cised Timothy, his son in the min- 
istry, Timothy being of Jewish 
descent on his mother's part, and 
his father a Greek. We read, "Him 
(Timothy) would Paul have to go 
forth with him; and he (Paul) cir- 
cumcised Timothy, because of the 
Jews which were in those quarters; 
for they all knew that his father 
was a Greek." Acts. 16:3-4. 



140 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



A careful study of the scriptures 
show that Paul and Peter and 
others who opposed the demands 
for circumcision and the keeping 
of the law on the grounds that it 
was not essential to salvation nor 
to good standing in the Church, 
still they did not oppose the custom 
when it was done, not as a religious 
rite; but solely as a national or 
racial custom. 

Some of the Abysinian Christians 
still observe the rite until this day. 

What lesson if any do we get 
from reading this perusal of a 
troublous problem of the Apostolic 
times? It seems to the writer, that 
entirely too much stress is laid on 
customs and rites in this age, and 
that the essential thing is a circum- 
cision of the heart, and an abiding 
faith, not in the ability of the flesh 
to bear the yoke of the law require- 
ment, which Peter said neither they 
nor their fathers were able to bear, 
but rather a saving knowledge of 
the fact, that all our righteousness 
is of the Lord, to whom be all the 
glory, honour, dominion and praise. 

Yours in humble hope, 

O. J. DENNY. 



GODLINESS A MYSTERY. 

And without controversy great is 
the mystery of Godliness: God was 
manifest in the flesh, justified in 
the Spirit, seen of angels, preached 
unto the gentiles, believed on in the 
world, received up into glory. — 1st. 
Timothy 3:16. 

That the works of God both in 
providence and grace is a great mys- 
tery is not debatable, it is beyond 
all question. Think of a being who 
is able to create the heavens and 
earth out of nothing, as is declared 
by Moses in the first of Genesis, 
and can any one who believes the 



statements of Moses, that God cre- 
ated the heavens and the earth, and 
then made the sun and moon and 
stars, and then formed man of the 
dust of the ground, doubt that he 
can do anything that his soul desir- 
eth? Those who question the 
miracles of the Bible do not have 
faith in him. Job said, I know that 
thou canst do everything. The car- 
nal mind must see to believe. While 
those who have faith look not at 
the things that are seen, but at the 
things that are not seen for the 
things that are seen are temporal, 
but the things that are not seen are 
eternal. 2 Cor. 4:18. 

I cannot explain or understand a 
power that can make a world out 
of nothing, and preserve human 
beings from harm in a furnace of 
fire, and shut the mouths of lions 
so they cannot hurt a man who 
stays all night in their den, and 
keep a man alive three days in the 
belly of a whale; but thank God I 
can believe all these things are pos- 
sible with the God of my salvation. 
I have for many years had a sweet 
hope that God for Christ's sake has 
saved even me, and I feel that a 
God who can save a sinner like me, 
can do anything that it is his will to 
do. So I do not question the Bible 
story that a virgin conceived and 
bore a son, and that that son is the 
son of God. He was God, mani- 
fest in the flesh, the equal of God, 
one with the Father, by whom all 
things were created. Jesus said, 
"No man can say that Jesus is the 
Lord, but by the Holy Ghost." Think 
of the trial of Joseph, when he 
found that his espoused wife was 
shortly to become a mother. He 
was a just man and not willing to 
make a public example of her, but 
was minded to put her away pri- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Ml 



vately, but while he thought on 
these things, behold the angel of 
the Lord appeared unto him in a 
dream, saying, Joseph, thou son 
of David, fear not to take unto 
thee Mary, thy wife, for that which 
is conceived in her is of the Holy 
Ghost, and she shall bring forth a 
son, and thou shalt call his name 
Jesus, for he shall save his people 
from their sins. Matthew first 
chapter. Joseph believed what 
the Lord told him. No man could 
have made him believe such a thing. 
Neither can man today make poor 
sinners believe in Jesus Christ to 
the saving of their soul. With man 
it is impossible but with God all 
things are possible. This Jesus 
was a man living among men and 
feeling all their infirmities, yet 
never was guile found in his mouth. 
He was God, and so he overcame 
all the temptations of the devil, and 
lived a life of perfect obedience to 
his Father. He came not (he said) 
to do his own will but the will of 
the Father that sent him. How 
deep the mystery. God manifest 
in the flesh, he suffered in the flesh 
and so was easily touched with the 
infirmities of mortal flesh and 
being God he cured their ills. He 
also stilled the storm when his disci- 
ples were afraid. No wonder they 
said, What manner of man is this? 
that the wind and sea obey him. 
And he can and does sometimes 
still the raging tempest in the hearts 
of his humble followers and thus 
give them rest. When at the same 
time they have to say with Paul, "In 
me, that is in my flesh, there dwells 
, no good thing." Justified in the 
! spirit. Read Matthew 3:16, John 
1:32, 1st Peter 3:18, 1st John 5:6. 
Jesus said that he always did the 
things that pleased the Father and 



so the Father said, This is my be- 
loved Son in whom I am well 
pleased. Seen of the angels. Read 
Matthew 28:2, Luke 2:18, Ephes- 
ians, 3:10, 1st Peter 1:12. These 
and other scriptures show us that 
the Father who sent him into the 
world, gave those blessed messen- 
gers both heavenly spirits and holy 
men of God to see him and recog- 
nize him as both God and Saviour, 
and so to proclaim him to others. 
Preached unto the Gentiles. The 
prophets had said that the Gentiles 
shall see thy light, also that in his 
name shall the Gentiles trust. And 
when the Jews put the gospel from 
them the apostle Paul said, "Lo we 
turn to the Gentiles, and when the 
Gentiles heard this they were glad 
and glorified the word of the Lord, 
and as many as were ordained to 
eternal life believed." How won- 
derful the Lord's mercy to send 
such a wonderfully glorious light to 
those who sat in darkness, to the 
intent that they should be turned 
from darkness to light. And how 
great is his mercy still in having 
the gospel of his blessed Son 
preached to poor sinners, for it yet 
pleases God, by the foolishness of 
preaching to save them that be- 
lieve, and do not those who hear 
and know the joyful sound glorify 
the word of the Lord? And in their 
hearts thank him for his great 
blessing, for it is food to their hun- 
gry souls and it draws the people 
of God very closely in love to him, 
and to each other. Believed on in 
the world. Is it not wonderful be- 
yond all comprehension that the 
true God of heaven and earth, 
whom the world does not and can- 
not by its own wisdom know or 
even desire to know. So manifests 
unto alien sinners in the body of his 



142 



ZIGN'S LANDMARK 



flesh, that they break out in soul 
confidence and say, "We believe 
and are sure that thou art the 
Christ, the son of the living God, 
and to those who believe he has giv- 
en the precious promise that they 
shall never die, and how it does 
feed and delight their hearts to be 
told over and over again of the 
wonderful things that Jesus has 
done for them. 

Received up into glory. There 
is perhaps no greater mystery in 
anything that the God of heaven 
has done, either in nature or in 
grace than that he took a body of 
flesh and bones up into heaven. 
John says, "If any man sin we have 
an advocate with the father. Jesus 
Christ the righteous. 1st John 
2:10. O how highly favored sin- 
ners are to have such an advocate 
in the courts of glory. He has 
gone there in his body of flesh, 
though out of the reach of mortal 
vision, and pleads the merits of 
that sacrifice which he made of 
himself on the cross, and we have 
his word for it that the Father al- 
ways hears him (heeds him) . And 
hence the blessed assurance that 
sinners helpless in themselves, shall 
at the call of their Saviour arise 
from the grave and meet the Lord 
in the air. For, says Paul, This 
mortal must put on immortality, 
and this corruptible must put on 
incorruption and then shall come to 
pass the saying that it is written 
death is swallowed up in victory. 
1st. Cor. 15th chapter. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



STAND STILL, AND SEE THE 
SALVATION OF THE LORD, 
AND GO FORWARD." 
Exodus 14:13, 15. 

Faith infolds these conditions as 
the product of grace; unbelief 



waives these states, and cries, 
"What must we do? If we stay here 
we shall all perish. Faith answers, 
"Stand still, and see the salvation 
of the Lord." Faith rests; unbelief 
wearies. A prophet hath said, 
"Their strength is to sit still." Faith 
is assured that the Lord hath deliv- 
ered, doth deliver and will yet de- 
liver. If salvation is from the Lord* 
what help does one need from 
man? If salvation is of the Lord, 
why should any man think it is part 
of himself? Did not Job ask, "How 
hast thou helped him that is with- 
out power?" Why will vain man 
intrude upon the Lord's work? "But 
there are two salvations, one of God 
and one of man" — so says vain 
man. But the Bible doth not so de- 
clare, Faith will not receive the 
added words. For why should two 
act when one is able and will do 
all? God's glory will not be divided. 

Who is there that would light a 
candle at midday to help the sun 
give light to the world? If such 
there be, he might be regarded wise 
in comparison to the man who 
thinks he has to do something to 
help the Lord, or to do something 
to get the Lord to help him, or to do 
something without him. Mark, it 
was not said, Stand still and see the 
salvation of God and man. To be 
called to see God's salvation is proof 
that salvation is of the Lord, of him 
only. 

Unbelief is consequent to and 
perfectly consistent with the nature 
of vain man, but it never could have 
gone forward at the command, as 
faith did. The man of faith had to 
learn to "stand still" before he 
could obediently "go forward." In 
the provision of grace he went for- 
ward in the wake of the hand and 
rod, which were stretched over the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



143 



sea. God opens the way and at the 
same instant leads the feet to take 
the first step. There was obedi- 
ence to faith. "By faith they pass- 
ed through the Red Sea as by dry 
land." This sea did not represent 
the blood of Christ, which was in 
ligure sprinkled on the "two side 
posts, and on the upper door posts 
of the houses," before Israel left 
Egypt, but did set forth difficulties 
over which faith triumphed. Evi- 
dently the sea through which Israel 
passed was not opened and made 
dry land throughout before the host 
moved; for in that case, sight and 
not faith would have been the 
measure of their tread. Assuredly 
the sea opened as they went for- 
ward so that their faith at every 
step was cast upon the Lord. Thus 
when they had reached the further 
shore they could sing the Lord has 
triumphed gloriously. Only by 
faith can the Lord's portion go for- 
ward, when from nature's stand- 
point they seemed hedged in from 
every quarter. Such was and ever 
will be the path under which the 
Lord's conducting hand that the 
men of faith "go forward." When 
men of unbelief see an open way 
they may essay to go forward, and 
like Egyptians, perish in the at- 
tempt. It will ever prove defeat 
and confusion when the world tries 
to do what God's people can only 
do when led by faith. 

The real condition of the heart is 
tested by the command, as, "When 
thou saidst, Seek ye my face; my 
heart said unto thee, Thy face, 
Lord, will I seek." "If ye love me, 
keep my commandments." 

"Holy men of God spake as 
they were moved by the Holy 
Ghost." It is the same power 
which leads and guides into 



all truth today. Only when the 
Spirit has engrossed the thoughts 
of any of the Lord's people, do they 
care to walk in the way of Mount 
Zion. The man of faith does not 
act in order to receive the blessing, 
but from it, as the man with a with- 
ered hand did not stretch it forth in 
order for it to be made whole; the 
extended arm is the evidence that 
it is whole, else it would have re- 
mained inert, dangling at his side. 
The immediate commands of the 
Lord are spirit and life, and from 
the same source comes the power 
and will to obey. Human will can 
never produce faith, hope, love, 
salvation, or a spiritual blessing. 
These are fruits of the Spirit and 
flow spontaneously, constraining us 
to serve and worship him from 
whom we have received all things 
that pertain to life and godliness, 
"From me is thy fruit found." Yea, 
his word is effectual, and "shall not 
return unto him void; but, it shall 
accomplish that which I please, and 
it shall prosper in the thing where- 
to I sent it." 

M. L. GILBERT. 



MRS. ADA O. EDWARDS 

Mrs. Ada O. Edwards, daughter of Jas. 
M. and Annie L. Corbitt, was born April 
12th, 1868, died July 2nd, 1929. On De- 
cember 18th, 1890, she was united in 
marriage to J. W. Edwards. In this union 
there were five children, two preceded her 
to the grave. Three were left to mourn 
their loss but they mourn not as those 
without hope. Her eldest son, Dr. S. M. 
Edwards, and eldest daughters, Mrs. N. C. 
Tripp, Ayden, N. C, her husband, J. W. 
Edwards, and son, J. E. Edwards, of 
Grimesland, N. C, two brothers, Elder G. 
M. Corbett, Greenville, N. C., R. F. D. 3, 
James S. Corbett, Greenville, N .C., 1116 
Myrtle Avenue, two sisters, Mrs. J. C. 
Moore, Tuscarora, N. C, Mrs. Charles 
Sumeral, Ayden, N. C. 

With many relatives and friends present 
Saturday before the first Sunday in June, 
1922, she united with the church at Gallo- 
ways and was baptized next day by the 
writer. She was a type of womanhood 
from a child laboring with her hands with 



144 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



patience and endurance. She proved her 
faith by her works and loved the doctrine 
of salvation by grace. She was faithful 
in every duty of life, in the church, in her 
home and to her neighbors, even until the 
end always, gentle and quiet, loved peace 
and the things that made for peace. She 
was a devoted wife, a faithful and sacri- 
ficing mother, a very tender sister. She 
was so afflicted with rheumatism in her 
last days and fell and broke her hip which 
added much to her sufferings but she 
never complained. The nurse said she 
was the best patient she ever nursed. 

Elder J. B. Roberts conducted her fun- 
eral service and the body was laid in its 
last resting place to wait the resurrection 
of the body at the last day and we shall 
be caught up to meet the Saviour in glory 
and ever be with the Lord in Glory. May 
the Lord bless us all. 

Written by her brother, 

JAS. S. CORBITT. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas on Jan. 2nd., 1930, Our Heav- 
enly Father saw fit to remove from earth 
our dear Sister Isabella Fleming, 

In her passing Great Swamp Church has 
lost a devoted member. She seemed ever 
to carry a deep interest in the welfare of 
the church, was devoted to her family, and 
kind and tender towards her friends. We 
miss her and mourn the departure of our 
dear sister. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

First, That we bow in humble submis- 
sion to the will of Almighty God who giv- 
etJtt and taketh away. Blessed be Hia 
name. 

Second, We extend to her bereaved fam- 
ily our deepest sympthy in this hour of 
sadness, and pray the guiding hand of the 
Lord will direct and comfort them. 

Third, That a copy of these resolutions 
be placed on our church record and a copy 
be sent to Zion's Landmark for publica- 
tion. 

Done by order of Conference Saturday 
before the fourth Sunday in January 
1930. 

S .B. DENNY, Moderatar 
LENA HARRINGTON, ' Clerk. 



5TH SUNDAY MEETING 

A 5th Sunday Meeting will be held with 
Spray Church, Spray, N. C, 5th Sunday 
and Saturday before in March. Meeting 
on Saturday to begin at 2 o'clock p. m. 
All day service on Sunday. 

We invite all who love the truth to meet 
with us. 

D. V. SPANGLER, Clerk. 

Cascade, Va. 



APPOINTMENTS FOR ELDERS J J. 
HALL AND L. J. CHANDLER. 

Durham, Sunday night, April 6th. 
Oak Grove, Monday, April 7th. 
Willow Springs, Tuesday, April 8th. 
Angier, Wednesday, April 9th. 
Bethel, Thursday, April 10th. 
Raleigh, Friday, April 11th. 

W. F. YOUNG. 



PIG RrVER ASSOCIATION. 

The Spring Session of the Pig River 
District Primitve Baptist Association will 
be held with the church at Rocky Mount, 
Va., beginning on Friday before the 1st. 
Sunday in May 1930 to which an invita- 
tion is extended to all lovers of Truth. 

ELDER RANDOLPH PERDUE, Mod. 



THE CONTENTNEA UNION 
The next session of the Contentnea 
Union was appointed to be held with the 
church at Moore's meeting house, Wilson, 
Co., N. C. the fifth Saturday and Sunday 
in March 1930. Elder A. M. Crisp was 
Cjhosen to preach the Introductory sermon 
and Elder W. B. Kearney as alternate. 

Moore's church is situated about 8 
miles east of Wilson on highway between 
Wilson and Pinetops. 

A special invitation is extended our 
ministering brethren. 

J. E. MEWBORN, 

Union Clerk. 



NOTICE 

The next session of the White Oak Un- 
ion is appointed to be held with the 
church at Maple Hill, near highway 601, 
on Saturday and fifth Sunday in March 
1930. 

All lovers of truth are invited to meet 
with us. 

Yours in hope, 
R. W. GURGANUS, 
Union Clerk. 



LINVILLE UNION 

The next session of the Linville Union 
is appointed to be held with the Church at 
Sandy Creek, in Raudolph County, North 
Carolina, on Saturday and Fifth Sunday 
in March 1930. 

An invitation is extended to brethren, 
sisters and friends, and a special invita- 
tion to ministers. 

W. L. TEAGUE. 



EASTERN LITTLE RIVER UNION 

The Eastern Little River Union will be 
held with Union Church, Johnston Co., 
N. O. on Saturday and 5th Sunday in Mar. 
1930. Elder E. F. Pearce is appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon. Eld. J. 
T. Collier is appointed his alternate. 

Brethren, sisters, friends and ministers 
especially are cordially invited to atte»d. 

J. A. BATTEN, 

Unioa Clerk. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

= = AT ^^^^^^^^^^ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII. APRIL 1, 1930 No. 10 



THE LOlj ^ED THE WIDOW. 
% 

"So Elijah arose and went to Z t And when he came to the 

gate of the city, behold the wido-\\ \. tan was there gathering sticks: 
and he called to her, and said, Fetch' T pray thee, a little water in a 
ressel, that I may drink. \ 

And as she was going to fetch it, he c 5 ^, . to her, and said, Bring me 
I pray thee, a morsel of bread in thine ha2d. 

And she said, As the Lord thy God liveth, I have not a cake, but an 
handful of meal in a barrel, and a little oil in a cruse: and behold I am 
gathering two sticks, that I may go in and dress it for me and my son, 
that we may eat it and die. 

And Elijah said unto her, Fear not; go and do as thou hast said: but 
make me thereof a little cake first, and bring it unto me, and after make 
Tor thee and for thy sen. 

Fo r thus saith the Lord God of Israel, the barrel of meal shall not 
waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, until the day that the Lord 
sendeth rain upon the earth. 

And she went and did according to the saying of Elijah: and she and 
he, and her house did eat many days. 

And the barrel of meal wasted not, neither did the cruse of oil fail, 
according to the word of the Lord, which he spake by Elijah. — 1 Kings 
17:10-17. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 

TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Z ion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
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state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and fries '.ds are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Bcvotcb to the Cause of ^esus Christ 



A HUMBLE HOPE. 

Dear Brethren in Christ, I hope: 

Today it was my desire to write 
a few words of my humble hope in 
Christ for He has been so faithful 
to me in all my meek and lowly 
ways. I hope to be remembered in 
all the dear brothers' prayers. If 
you have room you can publish 
these few verses if you think they 
are all right. 

May God bless you in the future 
and may we all meet in a better 
world, is my prayer. 
Written by, 

Ada Gay, 

Verona, N. C. 

It was in the year of nineteen 

twenty-four, 
The twentieth day of May 
The saddest day of my life 
That I can recall or remember, 

The sadness was the calling 
Of my dear husband 
Who so softly answered and 
Returned home with a smile. 

But when you were called 

And left your sweet name, 

You left a reputation 

Without a blemish, scratch or stain. 

One consolation is that you're not 
dead, 

But only gone before, 

For life is God and God is life, 

In Him we live forevermore. 

On that hillside they laid 

My dear husband to rest, 

Tho' my heart was void and aching 

I remembered, "God knows best." 



Thy will be done, oh Lord, 
Thy will be done, not mine, 
And cannot we repeat this vow, 
"Not our will, O Lord, but thine." 

Now you are in heaven's repose, 
Though we did all in our power; 
We remember your tender hand, 
Now it holds a sacred flower. 

Now we have a little flower, 
So often we look at this, 
And think of you dear one, 
And there we place a sweet kiss. 

Some bright day we will meet you, 
Up above the azure skies; 
There we will remain 
Where loved ones never die. 



THE FLESH CUT OFF. 

"For we are the circumcision, 
which worship God in the Spirit, 
and rejoice in Christ Jesus, and 
have no confidence in the flesh." 
Phillippians 3:3. Just before this 
Paul had. warned his brethren to be- 
ware of false teachers and exhort- 
ed them not to follow carnal mind- 
ed men, but to follow after Christ, 
to leave off all carnality, that ye 
may be blameless and harmless, 
the sons of God without rebuke, in 
the midst of a crooked and per- 
verse nation among whom ye shine 
as lights in the world. To follow 
Christ is to depart from the ways 
of sin, to be humble and desiring 
the presence of the holy spirit to 
lead us in paths of peace and thus 
prove that we are the circumcision 
of God. The work of the Lord is 
perfect and shows its fruits in a 



146 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



meek and upright life. But we are 
warned against false teachers, who 
go about in sheep's clothing, de- 
ceiving and being deceived. These 
false teachers are often on hand 
and manifesting their idolatry and 
cause much wrath and strife and 
bring about much variance and 
seditious revellings. We are warn- 
ed against those causing division 
and also we are plainly taught in 
holy writ, that they which do such 
things shall not inherit eternal life. 
Such characters are easily spotted 
by what follows where they go. 
By their fruits you can know them. 

The true followers of Christ have 
never yet been loved by the unre- 
generate human race and never 
will be loved by the world for the 
world by wisdom knows not God, 
or understands anything of the 
Spirit of God in man. We must 
put off the old man, which is cor- 
rupt and put on the new man, 
which after God is created in right- 
eousness and true holiness. We 
are told not to be partakers with 
evil men, who are trying so much 
to establish their own righteous- 
ness. So pitiable is the sight of 
such havoc as has followed some 
overwise men in the church, who 
have presumed to establish the 
works of men in lieu of gospel or- 
der or bible discipline. Those 
never having been so afflicted real- 
ize but little of the effects. Surely 
if they who follow such a policy 
are the circumcision of God, they 
are sowing to the wind and will 
reap the whirlwind. If we do not 
see them suffer in this life we may 
know they were not sheep but 
wolves. Our trust should be in the 
Lord Jesus Christ and we be found 
walking in him and knowing his 
righteousness, which is of God by 



faith and conforming to his holy 
law pressing toward the mark for 
the prize of the high calling of God 
in Christ Jesus. As ye have there- 
fore received Christ Jesus, so walk 
ye in him. We are told to let no 
man spoil us through philosophy 
and vain deceit, after the tradition 
of men or rudiments of the world. 
It is so sweet and consoling to have 
evidence of hope in the cleansing 
power and efficacy of his blood, 
having been applied to regenerate 
ajid free us from our guilt of sin. 

If ye then be risen with Christ, 
seek those things which are above, 
membering that if we be the cir- 
cumcision of God in deed and in 
truth, not just by formality but as 
the elect of God, put on holy and 
beloved bowels of mercies, kind- 
ness, meekness and long suffering. 
And whatever is done by word or 
deed let it be accompanied with 
charity, that which is the fruit of 
the spirit and that we may continue 
in prayer and render all honor, 
praise and thanks to God, the giver 
of every good and perfect gift. Re- 
membering that if we be the cir- 
cumcision of God, it will be mani- 
fest by an orderly walk and Godly 
conversation. The eyes of the 
Lord are over the righteous and 
his ears are open unto their pray- 
ers, and if ye suffer for righteous- 
ness sake, happy are ye, and be not 
afraid, but sanctify the Lord God 
in your hearts and stand ye in his 
way. Humble yourselves there- 
fore under the mighty hand of God, 
that he may exalt you in due time, 
casting all your care upon him, for 
he careth for you. We desire fel- 
lowship with those who have fel- 
lowship with God. From all thats 
mortal, all thats vain; and from this 
earthly clod, Arise my soul and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



147 



strive to gain, Sweet fellowship 
with God." 

Submitted in love to the readers 
of Zion's Landmark. 

In humble hope, 

J. W. JONES, 
Peachland, N. C. 



A GOOD LETTER 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co. 

Wilson, N. C., 
Daer Sirs: 

I am sending money order for 
two dollars for the renewal of my 
subscription to the Landmark. 

Am also enclosing a copy of a 
good letter from Miss Bonnie Chick, 
which I wish to share with its read- 
ers if you see fit to publish it. 
Sincerely yours, 
ELIZABETH H. BARBOUR 
Benson, N. C, Route 1. 



Gardiner, Maine. 
Dear Sister Barbour: 

There are days when it seems I 
am more burdened and restless 
than others. Days when I cannot 
settle to natural work. If there is 
any rest it is in reading or writing 
of the dealings of the Saviour with 
His children. Lately the question 
as to whether I truly love Him or 
not has been with me much of the 
time. I cannot doubt He has 
shown me mercy and watched over 
me for surely I would have sunk 
beneath the weight of trials if He 
had not upheld me. As Paul found 
His grace sufficient so have we. 
Has not the joy of the Lord been 
your strength when you have been 
called to pass through sore trials? 
I know He has never failed you. In 
the last trial you spoke of I feel 
sure you were not left without the 
assurance that He would provide 
in every time of need. 



The Monday after my father 
was buried I realized I could never 
teach again and wondered what I 
could do as I was not strong at 
that time. It was as if the words 
"The Lord will provide," were 
spoken to me and all anxious 
thoughts were gone. That even- 
ing I was sitting at papa's desk 
writing when one of my sisters 
came and laid a five dollar bill by 
me and another brought material 
for a dress and a dollar bill. Here 
was the beginning of the fulfill- 
ment of the promise. Neither of 
them knew my thoughts for I told 
no one. From that day to this I 
have been bountifully provided 
for and wonder how I can ever 
doubt again. After seeing many 
manifestations of His power to 
comfort and sustain I am more 
and more distressed because of the 
fear that comes that I don't feel 
love for Him. I know there is a 
love that enables some to rejoice in 
death that they may be with Him. 
I know I am always glad when 
those around me are speaking of 
Him and His salvation or when I 
read of His dealings with others. I 
know there are moments of peace 
which passeth all understanding — 
a peace the world cannot give. 
How comforting the words — 
"Peace, I leave with you, my peace 
I give unto you; not as the world 
giveth give I unto you. Let not 
your heart be troubled neither let 
it be afraid." If God be for us 
who can be against us, but He will 
have all the glory in each deliver- 
ance. He has promised to fight 
our battles for us and He will but 
He will bring us to a place where 
we can only stand still and see the 
salvation of the Lord. With the 
poet we would sing, 



148 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"Let me not murmur nor repine, 
Beneath these trying strokes of 
thine, 

But while I feel affliction's rod, 
Be still and know that Thou art 
God." 

We are told it is through much 
tribulation we must enter the king- 
dom. Has He not granted you 
some of the sweetest tokens of His 
loving watch care right in the midst 
of sore trials? It seems if ever 
His word is precious and I'm led to 
seek Him its when storms are burst- 
ing over my head and I feel I must 
surely be destroyed. 

"Even in the last distressing hour, 
He has displayed delivering 
power." 

We can only "Thank God and 
take courage." 

May His blessings rest upon you 
in every hour of need. How little 
we realize how much we are in 
need of Him each hour, each mo- 
ment. 

With love, I hope in Him, 

BONNIE A. CHICK. 



TO THE BELOVED OF THE 
LORD. 

"Behold the Lamb of God that 
taketh away the sin of the world." 
Have you seen Him? I have seen 
Him on the cross in great agony, 
His cheeks quivered, He was suf- 
fering so. It grieved me very much 
to see Him suffer so. Finally I 
was made to believe that a part of 
that suffering was for me. Then I 
rejoiced. I felt like I would be 
saved. I have seen Him twice. 
After He had given up the ghost I 
cried out, "Glory to God." I felt 
sure that He died for me. In a 



dream I saw myself standing in 
front of the Judge of the quick and 
the dead. He was looking right 
at me. He said, "I reckon I know 
a mean man when I can see him." 
I felt condemned. I felt like I was 
a sinner. Then I saw my blessed 
Saviour pleading with His Father 
for me, and oh, how sweet was His 
precious voice as He plead for me. 
I was forgiven. Turned loose re- 
joicing in His love. I have seen 
Him in black looking haggard and 
worn. I thought it was no wonder 
that He looked so sad, haggard and 
worn when He had our sins to bear, 
and the persecutions of the wicked 
to bear. Oh, it made me feel so 
sorrowful to see or think what He 
had to bear for us poor sinners. I 
have seen Him looking bright and 
lovely. He was in the pool with 
Elder J. A. Ashburn and three la- 
dies at High Point. He raised His 
right hand and passed it over their 
heads and said to me, "These are 
mine," and pointing His finger at 
me said, "You are mine too." Oh, 
the sweet tears I shed, as I walked 
along praising the good Lord. I 
was at that baptising later on and 
enjoyed myself wonderfully well. 
I have seen Him standing in my 
breast praising God. Oh, this was 
so glorious to see Christ in my 
breast praising God. This flesh is 
vile and sinful, but Christ in me the 
hope of glory never has nor never 
will sin. 

Sometime ago I was in the mill 
at my work and while I was resting 
I heard a small still voice say, "Jim- 
mie, how would you like to wash 
your Saviour's feet?" I said, "Very 
well, if I could just have the oppor- 
tunity." In a moment I saw my 
Saviour sitting in front of me with 
iis legs crossed and I was on my 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



14'J 



knees, and I made one effort to 
wash His dear feet. I was so full 
of joy I threw both arms around to 
embrace his dear legs up to my 
breast. Of course His body of flesh 
was not there, yet Him being pres- 
ent in spirit and His peaceful pres- 
ence was very sweet to me. I 
never can tell you all the sorrow 
and trouble that I have seen, lo 
these many years. It may be that 
I had better leave the most of that 
off. The Savour came down and 
put His dear hands on my cheeks 
and made as though He was going 
to kiss me, and said "Salute thy 
brethren with a holy kiss." I felt 
so light it appeared like I hardly 
touched the earth for a few steps. 
Oh, so sweet was His peaceful pres- 
ence. So let us speak words of 
comfort to the dear little ones, that 
are so sad and lonely. 

About six weeks ago I dreamed 
I was standing near Hillsdale 
church and my Saviour walked up 
and sat down in frot of me, and 
crossed His legs, and said to me, 
"You can wash my feet here at 
Hillsdale church." This was very 
sweet to me. So I went to Hills- 
dale last Sunday and washed one 
of His dear little one's feet. He 
said, "Whatsoever you do unto one 
of the least of my litle ones, you do 
it unto me." We had some very 
good preaching, sweet singing, 
took the bread and wine, and wash- 
ed some of the dear saints' feet. 
We felt like the good Lord was with 
us, and blessed us. 

Yours in hope, 
J. R. JONES, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



ENCOURAGED AND BUILT UP. 

Dear Bro. Rowe and Mamie: 

I feel that it is too much for me. 
I do not feel worthy, and maybe I 



should not address you thus, but 
am sometimes made to hope I am 
one of the little ones, but if one at 
all the least. Paul said he felt less 
than the least of them all, so I guess 
we need not expect to go above 
that. I'd rather be a doorkeeper 
in the house of my God than 
dwell in the tents of wickedness for 
a season. If I know my heart I 
hope to live at the feet of my 
brethren and feel that too good for 
me, one so vile, so full of sin as I 
am. When I would do good evil is 
present with me. 

Bro. Rowe, words fail to express 
the enjoyment I received from your 
piece in the Landmark. I have 
wanted to write you ever since it 
came but it seemed from one thing 
to another came up so I haven't. It 
was indeed encouraging to me as it 
vmed our travel was somewhat 
alike. I felt built up and encour- 
aged to press onward. I feel but 
for the restraining hand of God, I 
would be on the floor dancing and 
doing many othe rthings that I am 
not. I am thankful to say I hope 
His almighty hand led my roving 
feet to tread that Heavenly road. I 
was as fond of dancing as any one 
until I was stopped on the floor 
one night I hope by the Lord and 
made to see my lost condition and 
without His mercy was gone world 
without end into everlasting punish- 
ment. I asked to be excused 
from the set. Mattie was there 
that night but wasn't dancing. She 
had quit sometime before that. I 
didn't know why, she didn't or 
hadn't told me I couldn't under- 
stand why she had quit. Little did 
I think that was my last, but it was. 
I went to one dance after that and 
thought I would try it again, but 
my steps failed me. I felt so con- 



150 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



demned for trying I promised the 
Lord if He would forgive me for 
that I would never try again, which 
I have never had any desire to do. 
I hope I have been killed to the 
iove of such things. It is encour- 
aging to know that you (one that I 
hold in such reverence, a pattern 
and example for us all, a man call- 
ed of God to preach the gospel of 
unsearchable riches of His King- 
dom) should have traveled it seems 
a portion of the same path that I, 
one so vile, full of mistakes as I am. 
J, if I could like the life now that 
I would like to, how much more en- 
joyable it would be. It is there- 
fore no more I, but sin that dwells 
in me. In me (that is) in my 
flesh dwells no good thing. We 
are sinners from the beginning and 
sinners still. I am glad He said, 
He came not to call the righteous, 
but sinners to repentance. 

We had a good meeting at Mal- 
maison yesterday. We will have 
the Union meeting there Fifth Sun- 
day in this month. Wish you could 
be with us. We get the Associa- 
tion next year. Hope you can be 
here. Remember me when it seems 
well, and write when you feel like 
it. I enjoy your letters. 

Your unworthy sister if one at all 
saved by grace. I feel to say, it is 
by the grace of God I am what I 
am. 

LENA BUTCHER. 

Rlairs, Va. 



tist cause and God never impresses 
anybody to perform a duty with- 
out giving him the ability and sure- 
ly it was from God for you were in- 
deed given the pen of a ready 
writer and it was I think as "Ap- 
ples of Gold in pictures of Silver," 
words fitly spoken in due season. I 
had been wishing some minister 
would reply to it and said that I 
thought somebody should do so. 
Hope you may "continue in the 
things you have learned — consider- 
ing of whom thou hast learned 
them" for obedience is better than 
sacrifice. 

I know how bad it is to suffer on 
account of disobedience and know 
too there's no promises for such but 
so many precious promises to the 
obedient and His promises are al- 
ways sure. I often feel like I had 
rather be a true follower of Jesus 
than to possess all the temporal 
things of this world but know I 
don't feel that way as often as I 
would like if so I would pray more. 

So often I try to ask for my 
strength to be renewed as the 
eagle's that I might soar above the 
love of the vain things of earth and 
that I may follow Jesus so closely 
that my enemies can't triumph over 
me, that I would not have to look 
for His judgments and fiery indig- 
nations but be able to say whatever 
is — is best. 

I would like to live so near Him 
I could say with the poet: 



THE PEN OF A READY WRITER. 

Elder S. B. Denny, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Brother Denny: 

Just wishing to tell you how glad 
I am to know that somebody felt it 
their duty to reply in defense of El- 
der Hassell and the Primitive Bap- 



"The bud may have a bitter taste, 
But sweet will be the flower." 

There have been seasons in my 
life when the deeper the troubles 
the plainer and sweeter I could see 
the hand of providence in all things 
and I was made willing to endure 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



1 5 1 



believing that tribulations worketh 
patience, patience experience, and 
experience hope." 

When we have faith to feel that 
God is gently leading us and by an 
eye of faith see beyond this vale of 
tears and willing to suffer re- 
proach for Christ's sake and rather 
be a doorkeeper in the house of 
God than dwell in the tents of 
wickedness, that I might be en- 
abled to walk in paths of righteous- 
ness for His namesake. 

After my dear mother passed 
away I felt like trying to ask God 
all the time to bestow upon me the 
same submissive, humble spirit she 
had and that I might hold out a 
faithful soldier of the cross as she 
did. She was endowed with wis- 
dom from on high as some of the 
prophets and apostles of old and 
after all she felt to be less than the 
least of all saints if one at all. 

Nothing less than the grace of 
God could have given her the 
bright face she had in the hours of 
afflictions for years, I might say, 
and not murmuring but always 
grateful to God for her blessings. I 
miss her lots now, but rejoice 
sometimes because she has reached 
eternal bliss. She was too good to 
stay here. This world was not her 
home. There are times now when 
I would give everything to be able 
to talk with her again and see her 
sweet face and feel so vile I wonder 
if I will ever be blessed to go to her. 

Wishing the richest of God's 
blessings for you and family. Love 
to Sister Denny. 

Excuse such a lengthy letter. Did 
not intend it. 

Unworthily your sister in hope, 
SUE MOORE. 
Robersonville, N. C. 



Sister Moore is one of that bless- 
ed number that John saw coming 
up out of great tribulation, having 
washed their robes and made them 
white in the blood of the Lamb. 

S. B. DENNY. 



LOVED ONES WHO HAVE GONE 
TO THEIR REWARD. 

Dear Bro. Stanfield: 

No doubt this is a very lonely 
Sunday to you and while I sit by 
our home fire, thinking of the 
meetings I must miss, maybe 1 will 
do well to write to you. I was not 
surprised when Martha called and 
said sister was dead. She certain- 
ly held up well and her strong reso- 
lution brought many joys and com- 
forts, when many in like condition 
would have given up. 

Sister Amanda's life walk had 
proven her faith, and her hope and 
conversation leaves us to believe 
that she is reaping the reward that 
belongs to the children of God. In 
all her visits here, I never heard 
her complain of her condition, but 
bore with patience. There is but lit- 
tle to this life anyway compared to 
the one promised to those who love 
God. I am often thinking of the 
dear ones who have gone to their 
reward and long to meet with them 
in the Eternal City of God. 

I have much time to meditate on 
these things now and love to see 
the many friends come to see me. 

I think I will be out some when 
the weather gets warm again. At 
present I am staying in except for 
a few minutes at a time. 

The radio entertains us some too. 
From it we learned of Pres. Taft's 
death within 15 minutes after he 
died last night. We get some good 
singing too, but lots more of mod- 
ern stuff that don't fit with me. 



152 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



I am looking for Elder Herndon 
sometime this evening. He will be 
at Pleasant Hill tomorrow. 

I must stop now and hope the 
Lord will be your comforter. 

Your brother, 

• H. L. BRAKE, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



READING IT FOR THIRTY 
YEARS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

I am enclosing money order for 
$2.00 for which please continue my 
subscription to the dear Landmark 
until Janaury 1930. I have taken 
it so long, don't feel like I can get 
on without it. Have taken it for 
thirty years or more and find great 
comfort in reading it. I greatly 
enjoy reading the editorials. 

Yours in hope, 
Mrs. Chas. D. Coker, 
Tarboro, N. C, Route 3. 



ELDER TOPPING DEAD. 

Mr. John D .Gold, 
Editor, Zion's Landmark, 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

I wish to thank you sincerely 
for the kindly interest you have 
taken, on behalf of the Landmark 
and its readers in my late husband, 
Daniel W. Topping, during his long 
illness and suffering that culmi- 
nated in his death March 4. He, 
himself deeply appreciated all you 
did for him, particularly in bring- 
ing to the attention of the Land- 
mark's readers his ailing condition. 
He appreciated communications 
from many of the readers of the 
Landmark, and especially was he 
grateful for your letters and the 
interest you manifested in him. For 



him, and on behalf of all the mem- 
bers of the bereaved family, do I 
wish to thank you personally, the 
Landmark, and its readers, for all 
the sympathetic courtesies and 
kindness shown. 

Should you desire it for publica- 
tion, I shall be glad to have pre- 
pared for you his obituary. I pre- 
sume that, at his death, he had 
been longer in the service of the 
Primitive Baptist ministry than 
any other living minister of that de- 
nomination, he havng been actively 
engaged in preaching for sixty-two 
years. 

Again thanking you for all you 
have done, I am 

MRS. D. W. TOPPING. 
Panego, N. C. 



MANY THANKS FOR THE 
CONTRIBUTION 

Enclosed find money order for 
five dollars ($5.00). Two of which 
pays my subscription to the good 
old Landmark for another year. I 
just can't do without it. And two 
dollars for a new subscriber, Mr. 
Sebe Goforth, Route 6, Dandridge, 
Tennessee. And the remaining 
dollar is for some old person that 
is unable to pay for the Landmark. 

Mrs. Nannie Phillips. 
Dandridge, Tenn. 



We deeply appreciate the efforts 
of Mrs. Phillips to secure new sub- 
scribers, and also her donation to 
assist in sending the Landmark to 
some one unable to pay for it. This 
fund is about exhausted. If our 
subscribers would each secure a 
new one and add something occas- 
ionally to the indigent fund, it 
would help greatly to solve our 
financial problems. 

J. D. GOLD. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



153 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy lathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Klder M. L. Gilbert —Dade City, 
Fl». 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore Md. 



VOL. LXIII. No. 10 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilaon 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. O, APRIL 1, 1930 



THE FAITHFUL WITNESS. 

"Grace be unto you, and peace, 
from Him which is, and which was, 
and which is to come; and from 
the seven Spirits which are before 
His throne, and from Jesus Christ, 
who is the FAITHFUL WITNESS, 
and the first begotten of the dead, 
and the prince of the Kings of the 
earth. Unto Him that loved us, 
and washed us from our sins in His 
own blood, and hath made us kings 
and priests unto God and His 
Father; to Him be glory and do- 
minion forever and forever." — 
Rev. 1:4-6. 

This quotation shows the source 
from which cometh Grace and 
Peace, and the way it comes — 
through the Lord Jesus Christ and 
from the seven spirits of God. Jesus 
Christ, who is the faithful witness, 
is, and was, and will ever be the 
one and only Saviour, who loved us, 
and washed us from our sins in His 



own blood, and hath made us kings 
and priests unto God. 

Men often see a tragic scene; but 
no two of them tell the story in the 
same language. Some seem to see 
more than others, or see things 
differently, and though they may 
all mean well, some may be consid- 
ered false witnesses, by others. 

Jesus Christ — the faithful wit- 
ness, is never mistaken. He being 
like the Father, knows the heart, 
and its contents. Men may mis- 
judge another; but the Lord is the 
righteous judge and David says, 
"Justice and Judgment are the hab- 
itation of thy throne ; mercy and 
truth shall go before thy face. 
Blessed is the people that know the 
joyful sound; They shall walk, O 
Lord, in the light of thy counte- 
nance. In Thy name shall they re- 
joice all the day; and in thy right- 
eousness shall they be exalted. For 
the Lord is our defence, and the 
Holy One of Israel is our King." 
Psalms 89th. chapter. 

What have we here? A Faithful 
Witness that will not lie. Prov. 
14:5. Christ the Lord of whom 
David said "Behold my witness is 
in heaven and my reward is on 
high." He rewardeth not accord- 
ing to our sins; but according to 
His mercy. 

Laban said to Jacob. "Lord 
watch between me and thee, when 
we are absent one from an- 
other." "God is witness betwixt 
me and thee." 

May the Lord, the Faithful Wit- 
ness, watch over us all when we 
are absent one from another, that 
Grace and Peace may be so mani- 
fest among us that we may be 
found walking circumspectly be- 
fore the Lord, though we may be 
alone. 



154 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Grace implies that there is a 
great need for mercy. Peace that 
cometh from above, is so unlike 
the confusion of tongues that is 
heard when men are left to their 
own surmisings, that there is no 
comparison. 

When we meet, in the name of 
worshippers, there is often some 
confusion of tongues. This is oniy 
proof that we are carnal. Our de- 
praved nature is such, that we are 
often like spoiled children, bent on 
having our way. Want to have 
others see through our glasses; 
but our own vision may. be imper- 
fect and there is need for charity 
toward others. None are perfect, 
save as they are made perfect 
through faith in God, and the Lord 
Jesus Christ. 

Touching the imperfections of 
the natural man, we may well re- 
call what David said, "God looked 
down from heaven upon the chil- 
dren of men, to see if there were 
any that did understand, that did 
seek God. Every one of them is 
gone back: they are altogether be- 
come filthy; there is none that 
doeth good, no, not one." Psalms 
53:2. 

As to the need for mercy we 
need not say more, and yet unless 
God, in His mercy, gives the heart 
of flesh, or quickeneth, they do not 
realize their need. 

The foregoing quotations show 
the walking of the Lord's people to 
be in the light of His countenance, 
and that it is in His righteousness 
that they are exalted. 

This one and only Faithful Wit- 
ness, who spake as never man 
spake, said: "Blessed are the p >or 
in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom 
of Heaven." 

May we not justly say that all 



who have in the past, do now, or 
that will in the future, feel the 
poverty of soul that enables them 
to say, from the hearth, "Lord be 
merciful to me a sinner," will in 
the end be blest to meet the Lord, 
and the redeemed of the Lord, in 
glory. We read, "As a Father of 
the Faithful, His name shall be 
called Wonderful, Councillor, The 
Mighty God, The Everlasting Fath- 
er, The Prince of Peace," and that 
"Of the increase of His government 
and peace there shall be no end," 
but it shall be ordered and estab- 
lished forever. 

O. J. DENNY. 



THE LOVE OF GOD SHED 
ABROAD IN THE HEART. 

Dear Mr. Gold and readers 
of the Landmark: 

I hope I may be excused for pub- 
lishing these very personal letters. 
Brother Dodson's letter, while very 
personal, breathes so strongly of 
the love of God at heart that I feel 
it is worthy a place in our family 
paper. 

Yours for the good of our be- 
loved Zion. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



Elder J. T. Rowe, 
Dear Brother: 

For the last few days and nights 
I have been thinking of you and 
wondering how long since first we 
met. The thought and memory of 
it all, is pleasant indeed. And 
when I think of the real cause that 
binds us until this moment my hope 
is strengthened and I am comforted 
to think it is solely because I saw 
the image of Jesus in your life and 
walk, and hearing you preach the 
gospel of our Saviour, and if you 
preached it, and I could hear and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



155 



understand it, that is good evidence 
that we are related, and both have 
life. It seemed from the very first 
the better I knew you the more I 
loved you, and some times I think 
this love is stronger than death, and 
if it is truly the love of God in our 
hearts in a sense it will abide, 
never die, Oh happy thought! 

You remember Elders Gold, 
Stone and Harriss were all at that 
Association. Now they are all 
dead, and this reminds us we soon 
shall fall asleep, then what a com- 
forting thought that we can some- 
times feel we know the joyful 
sound. Now my prayer is that 
you may be faithful to the end, 
that you may obtain and wear the 
crown laid up for God's children. 
I wish to say that you have so many 
times in preaching made my poor 
heart to rejoice. I just wish I could 
in some way while we live, hand 
you a bonquet of flowers, that I 
might see you smile, that we both 
might rejoice together in the good- 
ness and mercy of our God. 

With love to your family, I am 
as ever, your fond brother in hope 
of eternal life. 

R. L. DODSON, 
147 Broad St., Danville, Va. 



Mr. R. L. Dodson, 

Danville, Va. 
My dear Brother in a 
precious hope: 

Yours of the 17th came to me 
about noon on the 18th, and I as- 
sure you my dear brother that nei- 
ther my pen or tongue can tell how 
much I appreciate it. You express- 
ed the wish that you might some 
time while we both live be able to 
hand me a bouquet of flowers. You 
have in this letter, my dear brother, 
given me that which far exceeds 



the gift of any natural token of 
fleshly favor. You have given me 
a sweet evidence of the Christian 
love and fellowship that dwells in 
your heart for me and knowing 
you as I do to be a genuine Primi- 
tive Baptist, truly sincere in your 
profession, it affords me joy un- 
speakable. From the first to the 
last time we met it has always been 
a pleasure to me to meet and talk 
with you of the great mercies of 
God bestowed upon unworthy sin- 
ners. I have always felt that I was 
in the company of a true child of 
God and an humble follower of 
the meek and lowly Jesus, and 
have often wished we could be to- 
gether more. You said you were 
wondering how long it has been 
since we first met. I may be mis- 
taken but I think it was in August 
1892. I well remember the occas- 
ion and the pleasure it was to me. 
It was my first visit to the Staunton 
River Association and I well re- 
member the circumstances connect- 
ed with it. I was living at that 
time near the coast of N. C, and I 
saw in the Landmark the notice of 
the next session of the Staunton 
River Association to be held with 
the Stonewall Church in Appomat- 
tox County, Va., and although I 
did not know any of the people, or 
how to get there, I wanted to go, 
and could not get rid of the im- 
pression to go. So I had a friend 
to take me to New Bern, twenty 
two miles from my home which at 
that time was our nearest railroad 
station. I told the agent where I 
wanted to go and asked him to tell 
me how to go. He could not, but 
told me to go to Goldsboro, and he 
thought I could get the informa- 
tion I wanted there. So I went to 
Goldsboro, and there I was told to 



L56 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



go to Greensboro. So I went to 
Greensboro, and found that the 
place to which I wanted to go was 
some miles east of Lynchburg. So 
I took a ticket to Reidsville, arriv- 
ing there I think about eleven 
o'clock at night. I knew no one 
there except Elder J. M. Harris. So 
I made inquiry and went to his 
home and found on arrival that he 
was already in Virginia on his way 
to the same association that I was 
trying to get to. Sister Harris and 
her daughter, (now sister Lester) 
took me in and treated me very 
kindly, and I left the next day about 
noon, and while waiting at Lynch- 
burg for the train going east, I no- 
ticed a party of people that I felt 
were old Baptists, but said nothing 
to them, and no one spoke to me 
until we got off the train. I do 
not now remember the name of the 
station. The first man I spoke to 
after getting off the train was one 
there looking for visitors to the as- 
sociation. Then came my meeting 
with you, and others, many of whom 
have gone to their reward. It was 
a good meeting and I was blessed 
to enjoy it, and to form an acquain- 
tance with several dear ones who 
have ever been true friends and 
dear to me. The Elders you men- 
tion as being at the meeting are all 
gone and I doubt not are resting 
with their Saviour, Jesus. Dear 
Brother Gold, the last one whose 
like we shall not see again. He 
was a stalwart in the militant king- 
dom, yet gentle and humble as a 
child. 

This friendship and fellowship 
formed thirty seven years ago still 
exists and is sweet beyond expres- 
sion. And your statement that 
you have many times rejoiced while 
I preached is a blessed evidence to 



me that the Lord gave me to preach 
his truth to the comfort of his dear 
children. Yes, dear brother, these 
things are blessed evidences to us 
both, and I thank God and take 
courage. 

Your brother in Christ I hope, 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



ELDER G. W. STEWART 

0. J. Denny, 

brother in the Lord: 

your request I am now writing a 

ccount of the life and death of our 

ed brother, Elder G. W. Stewart. 

quested his daughter-in-law to 

of him, and she desired to do so, 

10 now writes me, saying, "You 
it." I notice in the Landmark of 
5 tli at I wrote Mr. Gold that he 
ad, and I said "Too much can't be 
f this good and great man." Early 

second Saturday his daughter-in- 
Lth whom he lived and died wired 
at Eld. Stewart died at 5 o'clock 
lorning, January 11, 1930. 

11 sending for your use clippings 
wo secular papers, and all can see 
e had a "good report" of those 

cording to Eld. Pittman's 
aphical History" he would have 
8 years old had he lived until May 
0. Or, he was 78 years old at the 
f his death. His only son, John W., 

few years ago and the shock of 

death was too much for the old 
ind though at times he appeared as 
i nothing had happened, he grieved 
....in- d his death until the last, 
e had an idol it was John W., but 
>rd took John some years ago, and 
l he was so useful in so many ways 
>rd called and John, and all of us 
abey. In the passing away of Eld. 

Stewart our cause is called on to 
p one of its greatest advocates. For 
I love the gospel truth. And it to 
is very instructive to listen to him 
\\ 'liiie we lived in the same state 
ire near two hundred miles apart, 

few times I was elected by his 
i at Five Mile to join him and others 
lire days meeting beginning on Fri- 
ifore the third Sunday in July. 

months I have been reading his 
1 views upon various Bible subjects, 

affords me great pleasure to say 
hat his ability to write was unusual. 

Eld. J. B. Little of Abbott Creek 
y, "I have never seen anything from 
a that did not appear to be biblical. 

thought that he said too much for 
en he first introduced me to his peo- 
tte said, "Bro. Satterwhite is a Bible 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



157 



The first time I heard him preach was 
at the famous "Ranah Counsel," and I 
asked Eld. J. E. W. Henderson, "Who is 
the man preaching?" And being inform- 
ed I felt that he was a "servant of the 
most high God, that shows unto us the 
way of salvation." He was authority on 
order, having written a book entitled "Or- 
der and Disorder." A few years ago 
some elders undertook to set him right on 
some of his church work, but it was only 
an invasion, and they appeared to have 
forgotten that his superior knowledge gave 
him an advantage, which deserved first 
consideration. 

No need to come at him with swords 
and staves as a thief, for he possessed 
wisdom from above which is first peace- 
able, gentle, easily entreated, etc. But 
volumes would not be sufficient to tell 
of his virtues, so we had as well sto pat 
one place as another. 

His last deep concern was on the sub- 
ject of "Evolution," and it moved him to 
write a booklet, titled, "David's Sling." 
And his last blow at this great modern 
error will live on and on, and like a 
pebble dropped into the ocean, its wave 
can not be stayed until it has accomplish- 
ed the things whereunto God has sent it. 
This work of his has the endorsement of 
wise men and women all over the country, 
and he, though dead still speaks in this 
maner. Had he lived I believe he would 
have asked the next legislature to pass a 
bill to prohibit the teaching of this heresy 
"Evolution" in the schools of the state of 
Alabama as some states had already done. 

But few men die and leave to the gener- 
ation which is to follow the great amount 
of true testimony of thing essential for 
our upbuilding as George W. Stewart. 

"Blessed are the dead that die in the 
Lord, yea, saith the spirit, they rest from 
their labor and their works do follow 
them." 

Funeral services were held Sunday af- 
ternoon at the Primitive Baptist Church 
which deceased had erected some years 
ago and which he served as pastor, con- 
ducted by Elder Henderson of Troy, an 
able minister of his denomination. The 
speaker paid appropriate tributes to the 
memory of deceased. The services were 
very largely attended by people from far 
and near who came to pay their last trib- 
ute of respect to the emomry of deceased. 
The burial was in the cemetery near the 
church. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE, 

Lafayette. Ala. 



SAMUEL T. PARSONS 
It is with sad hearts that we write of 
the death of our beloved father, whom it 
has pleased God to remove from our midst 
by death, and may we ever bow in hum- 
ble submission to Him that doeth all 
things well, realizing that He makes no 
mistakes and that it is He alone that can 



bind up broken hearts and give us grace 
ever sufficient for the day of our trials. 

Our father, Samuel T. Parsons, was 
born January 16th., 1852, and departed 
this life March 10th., 1930, making his 
stay on earth 78 years, 1 month and 22 
days. He was bom in Pittsylvania Coun- 
ty, but moved to Charlotte in Nov. 1892, 
which luis been his home ever since. 

He was n kind husband, a loving father, 
and a good neighbor. His most notable 
trait of character was his love for little 
children. Even alter his affliction, his 
love for children was pathetic. He was 
not a member of any church, but was a 
believer in salvation by grace, and often 
spoke of joining the Old Baptists, but 
never did. 

He was amrried early in life to Miss 
Elmer Allen Hardy. To this union were 
born nine children, three of whom preced- 
pd him to the grave. He is survived by 
his loving wife, two daughters and four 
sons, Mrs. H. W. St. John and Jimmie S. 
Parsons of Charlotte C. H., Va., George 
T. and David B. Parsons of Cullen, Va., 
Airs. T. W. Roach of Phoenix, Va., and 
Richard M. Parsons of Danville, Va., 26 
grandchildren, 2 sisters and 2 brothers. 

Father's health failed two years ago 
and his mind became so weak that he 
was confined at home where he was lov- 
ingly cared for by his devoted wife and 
youngest son, Jimmie S. Parsons who will 
gri atly miss him. but we hope our loss is 
his eternal gain. We feel that all was 
done for him that kind friends and lov- 
ing relatives could do but none could 
stay the icy hand of death and he passed 
away quietly and peacefully without much 
apparent suffering after a stroke of 
paralysis which lasted 19 days. 

He is gone but not forgotten, 

Never shall his memory fade, 

But sweetest thoughts shall ever linger 

'Round the grave, where he is laid. 

The beautiful floral tributes attest to 
the love and esteem in which he was held. 

The funeral services were conducted by 
Rev. Eu banks of Phoenix and Rev. Harris 
of Cullen. The pallbearers were his 
grandsons and nephews. The flower girls 
were his granddaughters and nieces, and 
amidst a host of friends and relatives his 
body was laid to rest, beneath a beautiful 
floral mound in the family burying 
ground at his home to await the resurrec- 
tion morning when the dead in Christ 
shall rise and go shouting away to that 
home of glory to sing praises to God for- 

Submitted in love by his three young- 
est sons: 

George, David and Jimmie- Parsons. 
The following little poem is submitted 
to the memory of S. T. Parsons, by his 
wife his children and grandchildren: 



158 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Dearest husband, you have left me, 
In this world to mourn and sigh 
But beyond this world of sorrow, 
I hope we will meet again on high. 

Dearest father, how we miss you 
In our humble home below, 
But the Lord of Glory called you, 
And to Him you had to go. 

Dearest grandfather how we loved you 
No one here on earth can tell 
But the Lord did love you better, 
And so we say, dear one, farewell. 



MRS. LULA DODD TERRY 

It is with a sad heart I try to write the 
death of my only sister, Mrs. Lula Dodd 
Terry, daughter of W. S. and Fannie T. 
Dodd. Born November 2. 1871, near 
Sandy Level, Pittsvania, she died Decem- 
ber 20, 19 29, near Brookneal, Virginia, at 
the home of her daughter, Mrs. Dewev 
Holt. 

She leaves one sister, writer of this, one 
daughter, Mrs. Ruth Holt and five grand- 
children, seven brothers, J. R. Dodd, J. W. 
C. S., W. T., R. A., W. R. and S. H. Dodd. 

She was a sister and a great helper to 
all of us She was one of the finest, pur- 
est, truest, ladies I ever knew. She never 
lost an opportunity to speak a kind word 
to every one she met. She was gifted in 
telling people of their wrong and making 
friends. By so doing all were benefit- 
ted by kind loving advice, made those who 
knew her best love her most. No one had 
more friends. All was done to save her 
life that could be done. Her brother, Dr. 
W. T. Dodd was sitting by her bedside, 
talking when she passed away, without 
a struggle. 

I know when she was bidding her loved 
ones goodby here, it was only saying good 
morning in Mansions that her heavenly 
Father had prepared for her. 

The day she was buried was terrible. 
This did not keep the crowd away though. 
A large crowd came, some from long dis- 
tance to bid farewell to the last of her 
remains. She was buried at Fallen River 
Baptist Church by the side of her father 
and mother. 

Truly she is now rejoicing with many 
loved ones gone on before. She wished 
every one well. Doubtless she had wel- 
comed more guests in her home than any 
one of her circumstances. She was al- 
ways glad to have an opportunity to do 
something for others. Being a widow she 
worked as a milliner thirty-three years, 
most of the time regular. Often sending 
cards of cheer and visiting the sick. 

A young lady said to me, "We will al- 
ways remember her with kindness and 
love and few in the community but what 
had some remembrance from her." 

She lived some distance from her 
church, but would go twenty miles on 
train and then walk two miles, and loved 



to do it thinking it a privilege and blessed 
food that she was receiving that lasted her 
through life and today she is with the re- 
deemed. 

Her faith in God made her a willing 
example and all of her bright smiles are 
missed, but I know she today is rejoicing 
with her Saviour, who said, "Well done, 
enter into thy rest forever to be blest, no 
more tears to shed, no sorrow or disap- 
pointment, no more farewells. 

She Joined Windfall Primitive Baptist 
Church, fourth Sunday in July, 1915, and 
was baptized by her pastor and surely a 
said of God was entering toin service of 
the Master. She enjoyed trying to show 
others the place of salvation, God had In 
love and mercy shown her. She was one 
of the kindest persons I ever knew, in 
such a true and loving, unselfish way, of- 
ten doing for others and denying herself 
of things she needed. 

I think it must have been as Paul said. 
"By the grace of God I am what I am." 
for only God's hand and guidance could 
work the work of Godliness she did in 
her humble way. She made the world 
better by living her true and pure life. 
Her example is worthy of emulation and 
I pray we may all so live as to meet her 
in the heaven of rest. 

Her sister, 

NANNIE DODD CANADA. 

Phoenix, Virginia, Charlotte County. 



ELDER HARDY DIES SUDDENLY. 

Elder L. H. Hardy passed away sudden- 
lv Saturday, March the 29th. He was 
preaching in the church at Mullins, S. C. 
or near there when the summons came 
and he was called to a higher service with 
his Master whom he loved so well and 
served so faithfully. 

His remains were taken to Atlantic, his 
home, and the funeral was conducted at 
eleven o'clock Monday the 31st., by Elder 
E. L. Cobb of Wilson and Elder Joshua 
Mewborn of Green County. 

Both spoke of his faithfulness, and de- 
votion to the Primitive Baptist cause, and 
of his ministry which has covered the 
greater portion of his life of 79 years. 

His health has been poor for the past 
few years ,and his wife who has minister- 
ed to him so kindly and who accompanied 
him wherever he went was with him when 
he died. 

There was a gerat outpouring of people 
at his funeral and the affection with 
which he was held, both in and out of the 
church was in evidence. 

DEACON AV. G. TURNER 

He was born Aug. the 11th 185 7 the son 
of .7. P. and Nannie G. Turner, and was 
married to Mary L. Eddy June 1879. To 
them were born five children, R. O. of 
Homestead, Fla., Mrs. E. H. Bernard of 
Roanoke, Va., and G. C. and P. H. of Roa- 
noke, Va., and C. W. of Bristol, Va. Bro. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



159 



Turner received a hope in Christ and 
united with the church in Roanoke, Va., 
May 29, 1921 and was baptized June 26, 
1921 by Eld. G. F. Dyer. Soon after this 
the church asked for him to be ordained 
to the office of deacon. On Apr. 29, 19 22, 
a presbytery consisting of Elders Lester, 
Dyer and Helms, set him apart as a dea- 
con. This office he continued to fill till 
Oct. .'lO, 1929 when he was called away in 
death, leaving his companion and children 
together with the following brothers and 
sisters to grieve for Rim, C. II. Turner of 
Richmond, S. E. of Roanoke, Va., J. V., 
East Falls Church, Va,, A. P. of Martins- 
ville, Va., Mrs. Bettie Woody and Mrs. T. 
E. Turner of Richmond, Va. Brother 
Turner was a strong believer in salvation 
by grace, well established in the faith of 
Cod's elect, filled his seat in the church 
and acted faithful according to his under- 
standing. Therefore has left evidence 
sufficient for us to say he has fallen 
asleep as one of God's children, and is 
resting in His love. Funeral services were 
held in the Church at Roanoke by Elder 
Randolph Perdue to a host of friends and 
kin. Then he was laid away in Fairview 
to await His Lord's coming. 

J. P. HELMS. 



IN MEMORY OF MY WIFE 

She was born January 27, 1862 and 
died November 17, 19 29. She was the 
daughter of J. E. Vainwight and wife. We 
were happily united in bonds of marriaae 
December S, 18S0, living happily together 
for 4 9 years. In October of 1887 I made 
an offer !o the church at Galloways and 
was prepared for baptism the following 
day. My wife at the water that day of- 
fered herself to the church and we both 
were led in the water and baptized by Eld. 
John A. Williams. This was the greatest 
day of our lives. We never regretted 
our marriage and always rejoiced in our 
baptism together. She was a good Chris- 
tian woman and made Christian marks 
through her life. A kind and loving mo- 
ther and a very useful neighbor always 
willing to lend a helping hand to the sick 
as long as her health permitted. While 
she was attending to the chlidren during 
the night hours she contracted a cough 
and never was cured of it, and in the lat- 
ter years she suffered severely. I spent 
much in trying to cure her but it was alj 
in vain. 

After we joined the church I was elect- 
ed as a Deacon and she was always ready 
and willing to make ready for the com- 
munion services. She gladly prepared to 
help take care of our brethren and sisters 
who visited our church. It was the pleas- 
ure of her life to be able to do something 
for some one, never expecting anything in 
return. 

There were twelve children born to this 
union, four boys and eight girls. She is 
survived by two boys and seven girls. The 



two boys died when infants. There are 
numerous grand children and great grand 
children to this union. 

We have a sweet assurance of her rest- 
ing in Jesus for I have heard her say so 
many times, "I trust in God with a strong 
hope of being saved by His grace." Words 
would fail me to give a full course of her 
life of sweetness and tenderness and kind- 
ness and care for us. But she is gone to 
a better world than this, and I am so 
lonely but I am abundantly blessed with 
the tenderest care by my good children 
and son-in-laws and .daughter-in-laws. 

Composed by C. M. Corbitt, her loving 
husband and written by Geneva Corbitt, 
our daughter-in-law. 



W. R. HOUSE 

Whereas it has been the will of our 
Heavenly Father to take from us our 
dear brother, a faithful deacon, we are 
begging for a spirit of resignation to His 
will; therefore we resolv.e, 

1st, To extend our deepest sympathy to 
his bereaved widow and loved ones. 

2nd, That this be recorded in our 
minutes. 

3rd, That a copy be sent to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication. 

Done by order of the church at 
Kehukee Saturday before third Sunday in 
March 1930. 

A. B. DENSON, Mod. 
WILLIE A. RIDDICK, Clerk 



LAFAYETTE BARNES 

On February 2nd., 1930, just as the 
sun was sinking low the death angel visit- 
ed our home and took from us my beloved 
brother, Nathan Lafayette Barnes. For 
three years he had been troubled with 
high blood pressure and was not able to 
do any hard labor. But we did not think 
his condition serious. On his way to San- 
ford the day before he died he was taken 
finite sick and went to see a physician. All 
that night he suffered. Next morning he 
was better and said so. He insisted on 
sitting up by the fire, but would become so 
weak he would have, to lie down. Late in 
the afternoon he was sitting up talking 
and seemed so cheerful. He said, I feel 
so mnch better. Later he went to move. 
He said. "Oh! I moved too quick." Sud- 
den fy he suffered a heart attack. I rush- 
ed to his side and held him in my arms 
as he passed away. I never, O, never, 
will forge*: these moments of agony. Soon 
all was quiet and still and a smile settled 
on his face and since that moment I have 
been satisfied that all is well with his soul. 

He had never united with any church, 
still he was not satisfied on the outside, 
and often talked with me about it. He 
read his Bible so much he could tell you 
where to find any passage of scripture. He 
said, "I love to hear the gospel preached 
no matter where, in the church or out in 



100 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



the open. He went to hear all denomina- 
tions, but was partial to the Primitive 
Baptists. He had much sorrow in his life, 
having lost his wife and two children years 
ago. He bore his sorrows with patience 
awaiting the time when the Lord should 
call him home. He would often say, "I am 
not afraid to die." Often he would tell 
me not to worry so over the things of this 
world. O, I am so glad he spent his last 
days with me. His life will be an inspira- 
tion to me. 

The funeral was' held on Wednesday at 
11 o'clock at the home of his brother, 
Royelle L. Barnes, after which interment 
was made in the family cemetery. 

Rev. G. W. Boswell of the Primitive 
Baptist Church conducted the service. 

Lafayette Barnes was the son of George 
W. and Lucinda Barnes and spent his en- 
tire life except the last year, in Wilson 
County. He was 36 years of age. He 
married Miss Addie Skiner of Wilson, 
N. C, who preceded him to the grave eight 
years ago. He is survived by one son, G. 
H. Barnes of Bailey, N. C, one brother, 
Royelle L. Barnes of Wilson, N. C, five 
sisters, Mrs. Hilliard Boykin, Bailey, N. C., 
Mrs. Robert E. Lamm of Carthage, N. C, 
Mrs. Pharoah Bullock of Cameron, N. C, 
Mrs. John P. Parker of Pinehurst, N. C, 
and Mrs. B. M. Cummings of Florida. 

He was loved by young and old. His 
genial disposition and friendliness won for 
him a host of friends, and many will learn 
with genuine regret of his passing. 

I do believe that just the 
But glorified, is waiting 
Where we shall meet, 
If only I am counted \ 
by-and-by. 
Written by his sister. 



MARY ELIZA WRIGHT 



am pleased to say that Sister Wright 
was always ready to bear any burden that 
seemed good for the cause of her 1 



We feel sure that she was redeemed of 
the Lord, that she is gone to the land of 
paradise, there to await the morning of 
the resurrection. There to rise an im- 
mortal body, fashioned like unto the Son 
of Glory, that she will meet our Saviour 
in the clouds and take that sweet flight 
home to glory to praise God the Father 
and the Son forever and ever. 

Written bv 

E. L. VAUGHT, 
Clerk of Simpson Creek Church 

Loris, S. C, R. 2. 

MRS. W. T. CHANEY. 

Please publish a notice of the death of 
my beloved wife who died August 6, 1929. 
Her stay on this earth was 67 years and 
one month. She certainly believed in 
prayer. She always knelt and said her 
prayers before going to bed. She told me 
a few days before she died not to be sur- 
prised if I came home and found her dead, 
and that I might know she was all right. 
I am left alone and I hope that you will 
pray for me that I may meet her in the 
promised land. 

. CHANEY. 



: Co., Va. 



S. I). SIMPSON 

with request from the Deacon 
Creek church I will try to 
■t notice of the death of our 
her, S. D. Simpson, who de- 
life very suddenly September 
o. Simpson was born Feb. 17, 
g his stay on earth 55 years, 
9 days. He was married to 
King, January 2, 1900. To 
ere born 7 children ,all living. 
;ed a hope in Christ and offer- 
urch at Cypress Creek on Sat- 
i Second Sunday in August 
?ceived and baptized on Sun- 
r Isaac Jones, lived a consis- 
• until death, claimed him. 
ie church as clerk for many 
as loved and respected not 



Nea 



iths 



ed and 



alk 



six weeks before her death she was again 
confined to her bed. 

All that two pi 
dren and kind fri 
claimed His own. 

This sister is gone but not forgotten. 
The life she lived is worthy to be remem- 
bered. Her husband was and is yet dea- 
con of Simpson Creek Church and Moder- 
ator of the Mill Branch Association. I 



Written by one that loved him as a bi 
ler in Christ I hope. 

R. W. GURGANUS. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

: AT ^^^^^^^^^ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIII. APRIL 15, 1930 No. 11 



ELIJAH HEALS THE WIDOW'S SON. 



"And it came to pass after these things that the son of the woman, 
the mistress of the house fell sick; and his sickness was so sore, that 
there was no breath left in him. 

And she said unto Elijah, what have I to do with thee, O thou man 
of God? art thou come unto me to call my sin unto remembrance, and 
slay my son? 

And he said unto her give me thy son. And he took him out of her 
bosom, and carried him into a loft, where he abode, and laid him upon 
his own bed. 

And he cried unto the Lord, and said, O Lord my God, I pray thee, let 
this child's soul come into him again. 

And the Lord heard the voice of Elijah; and the soul of the child came 
into him again and he revived. 

And Elijah took the child, and brought him down out of the chamber 
into the house, and delivered him unto his mother: and Elijah said, see 
thy son liveth. 

And the woman said to Elijah, Now by this I know that thou art a 
man of God, and that the word of the Lord in thy mouth is truth. — I 
Kings 17:17-24. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 

TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Zion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

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Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
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If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and frier ds are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zton's landmark 



©evotefc to the Cause of ^esus Cbdst 



GRACE AND TRUTH BY JESUS 
CHRIST. 



"The law came by Moses but 
grace and truth came by Jesus 
Christ." — John 7th chapter, 
17th verse. 

My well beloved brethren, 
sisters and friends: 

It has been on my mind for some 
time to write something for the 
Landmark as I have been reading 
it so long. I have been a reader of 
the Landmark 50 years. I do love 
what it sets forth. 

Feeling this would be the last 
time I would make such an attempt 
in this life, I am 73 years years old 
and I know I can't live much lon- 
ger. 

The subject at the head of this 
article has been on my mind since 
last Friday. I attended a debate 
between four missionary ministers 
of a very high type, two on each 
side. The question of the debate 
was, which was the greatest leader 
Moses or Joshua? 

The first speaker spoke very 
highly of Moses, and very slight- 
ingly and weakly concerning 
Joshua. The other side spoke very 
highly of Joshua and degraded 
Moses. 

Now brethren, I want to speak of 
both of these men as men of our 
God. Every man in his own order. 

The head of this article says the 
law came by Moses. God gave us 
the law through Moses. All the 
ceremonial law came by Moses. The 



Lord preserved Moses and saved 
his life because he was a proper 
child. The Lord loved Moses and 
raised him up in Pharaoh's courts 
and he was called the son of Pha- 
raoh's daughter, but when he came 
to years he refused to be called the 
son of Pharaoh's daughter, choos- 
ing rather to suffer affliction with 
the people of God than to enjoy the 
pleasure of sin for a season esteem- 
ing the reproaches of Christ great- 
er riches than all the treasures of 
Egypt. 

The Lord took Moses by the 
hand and he took the Israelites by 
the hand and the Lord led all Israel 
out of Egypt by the hand of Moses. 
Hence we see he had them by the 
hand and not by the heart. They 
followed Moses, while they were in 
Egypt they were under task mas- 
ters, in the plural masters. Now 
Moses has got them by the hand, 
this one only Moses the lawyer or 
law giver or by whom the law 
came. 

To my mind Moses was a servant 
of his God as was Joshua and God 
led him about and instructed him. 
Moses was helpless and weak and 
and couldn't do anything without 
the Lord. Moses was leading na- 
tional Israel in the wilderness and 
through the desert, though they 
found it waste and bare. Moses 
could do no more for those people 
away out there in the wilderness 
than the law of Moses can do for 
we poor sinners here in this wilder- 
ness of sin and sorrow. 



L62 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Moses of course was a great man 
and should be honored and will 
be honored by all who love him. It 
should not be Moses that we hate, 
but sin which dwells in us. David 
said, great peace have they that 
love the law, and nothing shall of- 
fend them. These people were 
worried with Moses, and Moses 
was worried with them. Israels 
travel and trouble in the wilderness 
is like the poor sinner's travel from 
nature to grace. He is following 
Moses, the Law which never could 
make the comers thereunto perfect, 
the law is our schoolmaster to bring 
us to Christ in whom we have de- 
liverance through his blood, the 
forgiveness of sin. 

Blood, the blood of human beings 
is red. Moses is leading these 
chosen people of God through the 
wilderness to the Red Sea. Moses 
had disobeyed God on one occasion 
when God told him to speak to the 
rock that the children of Israel 
might get water to drink for their 
tongues failed for thirst. Moses 
smote the rock and the Lord told 
him he shouldn't go over in the 
Promised Land. It seems to me, 
the further Moses led these people 
and the longer he was with them, 
the more trouble they did see. I 
don't believe brethren that God 
ever intended Moses to go over Jor- 
dan. Moses went as far as he 
could go in delivering God's chosen 
people from Egyptian bondage. 
Moses led them in the wilderness 
40 years. It was only a three day's 
journey could they have gone 
straight, but they weaved about, 
turned and twisted, crossed their 
paths and grumbled at Moses and 
would to God he had let them 
alone, let them stay in Egypt 



around the flesh pots and die and 
be buried in their own graves. 

But, oh Israel, grace reigned 
from Adam to Moses, even over 
them that had not sinned after the 
submilitude of Adam's transgres- 
sion, for by the law is the knowl- 
edge of sin, by Moses is the knowl- 
edge of sin and God will not con- 
demn the sinner by Moses' law and 
justify him by the same law. 

Brethren we will have to look 
around and see if we can find an- 
other law, for Moses' law in cove- 
nant form is dead. Moses is dead. 
The Lord let him view the Prom- 
ised Land and upon the Mount 
Nebo and was buried by angels and 
we know not where his grave is to 
this day. 

These Israelites came out of 
Egypt, all the way through the wil- 
derness and came to the Red Sea 
where they found themselves 
hedged up. Walls all around them. 
The Egyptians were behind them, 
the mountains on each side and 
the sea in front. 

The poor child of God in the 
travel of his soul from natures dark- 
ness to the light and liberty of the 
children of God, he tries to satisfy 
the law, he tries to save himself by 
the works of the law, but poor sin- 
ner the more you try to be justified 
by the law, the more it will con- 
demn you. 

When to the law I trembling 
fled, it cursed me and pronounced 
me dead. I fell beneath its weight. 
Joshua must take this people across 
the Jordan. Moses, their great 
leader, is gone and they know not 
where. The Lord gave them into 
the hands of Joshua, which to my 
mind is a type of the Lord Jesus. 
Grace and truth came by Jesus 
Christ. John 1st chapter, 17th 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



163 



verse. Grace — what is grace? It 
is love and kindness bestowed upon 
man without merit. It is written 
in the scriptures, by grace ye are 
saved, through faith, and that not 
of yourselves. It is the gift of God, 
not of works, lest any man should 
boast, for we are His workmanship, 
created in Christ Jesus unto good 
works, which God afore-ordained 
we should walk in them. 

Joshua was one of the spies to go 
over into Canaan and view it. He 
and Caleb brought the news that it 
was as God had said, though there 
were great giants over there, but 
we can possess the land. It flows 
with milk and honey. There are 
orchards over there, and we shall 
eat the fruits of them. There are 
cool springs of water over there, 
and we shall drink of them. There 
are houses already built over there 
and we shall live in them. To be 
sure it is a great and wonderful 
land and God has given us the land 
to possess it, everywhere we set the 
soles of our feet. 

Joshua showed that he was 
ready to fight and willing to fight 
those great big giants. He said, 
though I be 85 years old I am as 
strong as ever I was. In every- 
thing Joshua did there was deliv- 
erance. His God told him what to 
do and he did the command, and 
like God commanded him and he 
led Israel to victory. Moses led 
the Israelites from the land of 
Egypt to and across the Red Sea, 
which was the end of his journey. 
He couldn't go over the Jordan. 

Another great man, which was 
put in charge, and he led them to 
the Jordan, into the Jordan and 
across the Jordan. Thus Joshua 
was a type of our spiritual Joshua, 
to-wit, the Lord Jesus Christ, by 



whom the grace of God is bested. 
The Lord pitieth his children as a 
woman pitieth her child and he is 
full of grace and truth, and of his 
fullness have we all received and 
grace for grace. Our God's grace 
was treasured up in him for these 
people before the world began. 
And in due time it is manifested to 
his people by Jesus who has abol- 
ished death and brought life and 
immortality to light through the 
gospel. After the Israelites cross- 
ed the Red Sea, they could look 
back and see the enemy drowned 
or destroyed by the power of our 
God in and through the Red Sea. 
It is even so with a child of God. 
After he has tried to obtain salva- 
tion by the law, which is impos- 
sible, he is drawn to the mercy seat 
and to the throne of grace. Here 
he begs for mercy and finds grace 
to help in this and every time of 
need. Here at this throne the poor 
sinner can see through Jesus he can 
be saved. And if saved at all it is 
Jesus, that fountain that was open- 
ed to the house of David and to the 
inhabitants of Jerusalem, for sin 
and uncleanness. Surely it is not 
of him that willeth nor of him that 
runneth but of God that showeth 
the mercy — and every child of God 
can sing the song of Moses and of 
the lamb, that was slain from the 
foundation of the world. Read 
15th chapter of Exodus. The Lord 
wont save you by the law, and he 
wont save you without the law. 
The law was fulfilled by Jesus 
Christ, by whom grace came. He 
magnified the law and made it hon- 
orable. So the true child of God 
loves the law because it is good. 
The commandments are holy. Oh 
what wonderful grace is this that 
Jesus gave us. My dear one it is 



164 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



so wonderful the sea gave way and 
the Jordan rolled back and swelled 
its banks, as soon as they put their 
feet or their toes in the brink of 
this river, it swells its banks, 
and oh, child of God, don't you 
well remember the baptizing that 
blessed water washed all our sins 
away. The Israelites went down 
in Jordan and built an altar and 
sacrificed unto the Lord. They 
carried the stones down in the Jor- 
dan with them. Our bodies go 
down in the water and are bap- 
tized. Our heart is the altar, that 
was once as hard as a stone, but is 
now made soft by the law that ham- 
mered on it, and the handle of that 
hammer is in the hand of Jehovah, 
who will never stop hammering un- 
til the heart is broken. Then His 
mercies in Jesus draws you to him, 
Jesus, who forgives our sins by his 
rich sustaining grace. 

Then, dear child of God, you can 
sing the song of the Lamb, which 
is the Lamb of God. And they sang 
as it were a song which is the 
song of Moses, the servant of God 
and the song of the Lamb, saying, 
great and marvelous are thy works 
Lord God Almighty. Just and true 
are thy ways thou King of Saints. 
Rev. 15 chapter, 3rd verse. So we 
see that Moses and Joshua were 
great men in the sight of our God 
and in the sight of His people. 

Now, brother Denny, I hope you 
will bear with my weakness and 
imperfection and after you have 
gone over this and corrected mis- 
takes publish same in the Land- 
mark if you think it is worthy a 
place in so great a periodical as th- 
blessed old Landmark which I have 
read now for 50 years. I am now 
73 years old and have been bap- 



tized in the fellowship of the old 
Moratock Church by Elder N. H. 
Harrison 50 years ago and have 
been reading the Landmark since 
that time. 

And as I am aware my time is 
near a close, I feel like this is 
my last writing. 

So goodby my well beloved 
brethren. I remain as ever your 
poor unworthy Brother if one at all 

George Robbins, 
907 Elizabeth St., Durham. 



COMFORT WHEEL-CHAIR CLUB 

Dear Brethren, Sisters and Friends : 
Comfort, the well-known maga- 
zine, published in Augusta, Maine, 
gives an invalid rolling chair for 
$75.00 worth of subscriptions. By 
this means many unfortunate shut- 
ins have been provided with wheel 
chairs free, and I am trying to get 
this club of subscriptions to get my 
sister a wheel chair. She hasn't 
walked a step in twelve years, and 
she will probably never walk again. 
The chair would be so much help 
to her family in caring for her, and 
it would also enable her to escape 
from the confinement of her room 
and give her a chance to get a peep 
at the beautiful world out doors. 
The Comfort is only 25c a year, 
or four years for $1.00 in this club. 
It is a good paper and cheap for the 
money. It is very interesting for 
young folks and contains only the 
best and most profitable reading 
matter published in any magazine 
of its kind. I shall be very grate- 
ful for any amount of subscribers 
from any one. Trusting you will 
help me in this work, and thanking 
you for your kindness, I am your 
brother in hope. 

(Elder) G. W. PRESNELL. 
Matney, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



1G5 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert —Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore Md. 



VOL. LXIII. No. 11 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, APRIL 15, 1930 



JERUSALEM THE OLD AND THE 
NEW. 

Brother E. A. Stanfield again 
requests our view on a New Testa- 
ment quotation, Matt. 23:37. 

"O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, thou 
that killest the prophets, and ston- 
est them which are sent unto thee, 
how often would I have gathered 
thy children together, even as a hen 
gathereth her chickens under her 
wings, and ye would not! Behold 
your house is left unto you desolate, 
For I say unto you, Ye shall not see 
me henceforth, till ye shall say, 
Blessed is he that cometh in the 
name of the Lord." 

JERUSALEM is a composition 
word taken from the Hebrew word 
Y'ra meaning foundation and Sha- 
leim or Salem, meaning peace. It 
is said it was given as a prophetic 
reference to the sacrificial death 
of the Lord Jesus Christ, whose vol- 



untary death, as the sent of God, is 
the only foundation of Peace be- 
tween Heaven and Earth, between 
God and man. 

The City of Jerusalem was the 
Capital of the Kingdom of Judah, 
and has, perhaps, known more of 
the horrors of war and conflict than 
any other earthly City. 

The New Jerusalem, which is 
from above, is a quiet habitation, 
the City of Peace. 

Moses, the representative law- 
giver, before his death, said, "And 
this is the blessing, wherewith 
Moses the man of God, blessed the 
children of Israel, and this is the 
blessing of Judah, and he said, 
Hear, Lord, the voice of Judah, 
and bring him unto his people, let 
his hands be sufficient for him and 
be Thou an help to him from his 
enemies. Deut, 33-1-7. 

In fulfillment of this blessing it 
is recorded, in 1st Kings, Chapter 4, 
2-25, that "Judah and Israel were 
many as the sand which is by the 
sea in multitude, eating and drink- 
ing and making merry." What a 
blest estate; but prosperity seems 
to lead to idolatry. Men seem to 
be disciplined by adversity and 
make better examples of faithful- 
ness, than when in great prosper- 
ity. 

Under the good reign of King 
Solomon, Judah and Israel dwelt 
safely, every man under his vine 
and fig tree, from Dan even to Ber- 
sheba. 

Yet this favored people of God, 
after the reign of Solomon and 
other good kings, were ruled by 
wicked Kings, went into idolatry, 
and we read "They served Idols, 
whereof the Lord said unto them, 
Ye shall not do this thing, and 



166 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



again the Lord said unto them, 
"Turn ye from your evil ways, and 
keep my commandments and my 
Statutes; but they hardened their 
necks, rejected His Statutes, and 
became vain, and left all the com- 
mandments of the Lord, their God, 
therefore ; the Lord was angry with 
Israel, and removed them out of 
His sight; there was none left but 
the tribe of Judah only, also Judah 
kept not the commandments of the 
Lord, their God; but walked in the 
Statutes of Israel which they made. 
2nd Kings 17. 

In treating the text, O Jerusalem, 
Jerusalem and etc., we should keep 
in mind the relation of that City to 
Judah and National Israel. 

The Prophet Isaiah said of this 
same blest; but sinful nation, as 
follows. "A sinful nation, a peo- 
ple laden with iniquity, a seed of 
evil doers, children that are cor- 
rupt, they have forsaken the Lord, 
they have provoked the Holy One 
of Israel unto anger, they have gone 
away backward." Isaiah 1 :4. 

To this same people he said, 
"Wash you, make you clean, put 
away the evil from before mine 
eyes, cease to do evil, learn to do 
well; seek judgment, relieve the op- 
pressed, judge the fatherless, plead 
for the widow. Come now, and 
let us reason together saith the 
Lord; though your sins be as scar- 
let, they shall be white as snow, 
though they be red like crimson, 
they shall be as wool. If ye be 
willing and obedient ye shall eat of 
the good of the land." "But if ye 
refuse and rebel ye shall be de- 
voured with the Sword; For the 
Mouth of the Lord hath spoken it." 
Isaiah 1:16-20. 

There is no promise of eternal 



life in the above; but there is a 
promise of natural blessing in the 
keeping of the commandments and 
Statutes of the Law Covenant. 

In calling attention to the back- 
slidings of the children of Israel 
and the tribe of Judah, we read. 
"Behold the Lord, the Lord of 
Hosts, doth take away from Jerusa- 
lem and from Judah the stay and 
the staff, the whole stay of bread, 
and the whole stay of water, For 
Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is 
fallen, — (Cast down but not de- 
stroyed) because their tongue and 
their doings are against the Lord, 
to provoke the eyes of His glory." 
Isaiah 3:1-8. 

Because of their sins, their house 
is left desolate, the work of their 
hands is not sufficient, the natural 
blessings and protection that the 
Lord gave to them, sheltering them 
as a hen doth her brood was not 
theirs to enjoy, and yet they were 
left without excuse, and, doubtless, 
felt condemned for their own sins; 
but we read further, from the same 
writer, as he exults, in the sure 
mercies of the Lord, saying: "In 
that day shall this song be sung in 
the land of Judah: We have a 
strong City; Salvation will God ap- 
point for walls and bulwarks, Trust 
ye in the Lord for ever, in the Lord 
Jehovah is everlasting strength." 
Isaiah 26:1-4. 

As to the conviction for sin, we 
read, "The sin of Judah is written 
with a pen of iron, and with the 
point of a diamond." How sure the 
writing and the point of diamond 
makes no failures. Written, yes, 
written where? Not on tables of 
stone, written not in a strange or 
uncertain language that the most 
ignorant cannot read, written not 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



167 



in the books of the Mosaic law; but 
written with a pen of iron, and with 
the point of a diamond, it is en- 
graven upon the table of their 
hearts. Jer. 17th. chapter. 

How truly this writing is felt and 
how justly, (it being engraved up- 
on the tables of the heart) , we are 
condemned. But to this sinful peo- 
ple, justly condemned, the Prophet 
says, "Thine eyes shall see the 
King in His beauty: They shall be- 
hold the land that is very far off. 
Look upon Zion, the City of our 
solemnities. Their eyes shall see 
JERUSALEM, a quiet habitation, a 
tabernacle that shall not be taken 
down, not one of the stakes thereof 
shall ever be removed, neither shall 
any of the cords thereof be broken. 
Isaiah 33rd chapter. 

The rebellious people of God, 
though defiled with their sins, the 
true Israel of God, shall be redeem- 
ed by His blood and righteousness, 
and shall behold Him in His beauty 
and we read, "The wilderness and 
the solitary place shall be glad for 
them, and the desert shall rejoice 
and blossom as a rose, and in the 
end of the same chapter we are as- 
sured "The ransomed of the Lord 
shall return, and come to Zion with 
songs and everlasting joy upon 
their heads; they shall obtain joy 
and gladness, and sorrow and sigh- 
ing shall flee away." Isaiah 3rd. 
Chapter. 

They can then say, not unto us, 
not unto us; but unto thy name be 
all the glory, and rejoice not in the 
work of their own sinful hands ; but 
can say of a truth, "Blessed is he 
that cometh in the name of the 
Lord." 

Although Judah and Israel were 
at times in great distress, we read, 
"In Judah God is known (God 



is known in Judah) His name is 
great in Israel. In Salem (the city 
of peace) also is His tabernacle, 
and His dwelling place in Zion." 
Psalms 76:1-2. 

Salvation is by grace. "And if 
by grace, then it is no more of 
works; otherwise grace is no more 
grace, But if it be of works, then it 
is no more grace; otherwise work 
is no more work." Romans 11:6. 

Paul said to the Church in Rome. 
"I would not, brethren, that ye 
should be ignorant of this mystery, 
lest ye should be wise in your own 
conceits; that blindness in part has 
happened to Israel, until the fulness 
of the Gentiles be come in. And 
so all Israel shall be saved ; as it is 
written, There shall come out of 
Zion the deliverer, and shall turn 
away ungodliness from Jacob: for 
this is my covenant unto them, when 
I shall take away their sins. For 
God hath concluded them all in un- 
belief, that he might have mercy 
upon all. O the depth of the rich- 
es both of the wisdom and knowl- 
edge of God! how unsearchable 
are His Judgments and His ways 
past finding out." For of Him and 
through Him, and to Him," are all 
things: to whom be glory forever." 
Romans 11th Chapter. 

Submitted in love, 

O. J. DENNY. 



THREE PARABLES. 

In the 15th chapter of Luke 
there are three interesting stories: 
The Lost Sheep, The Lost Piece of 
Money, and The Prodigal Son. The 
chapter begins thus: "Then drew 
near unto Him all the publicans 
and sinners for to hear Him. And 
the Pharisees and scribes murmur- 
ed, saying: This man receiveth 
sinners and eateth with them." Let 



168 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



us notice the different motives of 
the Pharisees, and the publicans 
and sinners, in hearing Jesus. We 
read in Matthew 22:15, "Then went 
the Pharisees and took counsel how 
they might entangle Him in His 
talk." Matthew 12:10, And, behold 
there was a man which had his 
hand withered. And they asked 
Him, saying, is it lawful to heal on 
the Sabbath day? that they might 
accuse Him. Luke 11:54. Laying 
wait for Him, and seeking to catch 
something out of His mouth, that 
they might accuse Him. John 8:6. 
This they said, tempting Him, that 
they might have to accuse Him. 
These scriptures all show that the 
scribes and Pharisees were seeking 
an occasion against Jesus, while 
the publicans and sinners drew near 
for to hear Him. The aim of the 
Pharisees was sinister, while the 
aim of the publicans and sinners 
was noble. May God grant that 
the aim of all of us in coming to 
the house of God may be to hear 
Jesus, for His words are truth, life 
and salvation. The Pharisees mur- 
mured that He received and ate 
with the publicans and sinners. But 
Jesus knew their hearts, and He 
put forth this parable unto them: 
"What man of you having an hun- 
dred sheep, if he lose one of them, 
doth not leave the ninety and nine 
in the wilderness, and go after that 
which is lost, until he find it? And 
when he hath found it, he layeth it 
on his shoulders, rejoicing. And 
when he cometh home, he calleth 
together his friends and neighbors, 
saying unto them, rejoice with me, 
for I have found my sheep which 
was lost. Now it is not because 
the lost sheep was worth any more 
than those at home that the shep- 
herd is more concerned about it, 
but it is his and lost and so he 



leaves those who are safe and goes 
seeking the lost one. And having 
found it he comes home with it on 
his shoulders rejoicing, and asks 
his friends and neighbors to rejoice 
with him because the lost is found." 

The same lesson is in the story 
of the woman, who having ten 
pieces of money lost one piece. It 
was worth no more than either of 
the other pieces, but it is lost ,and 
this gives her concern for it, and 
when she finds it she is glad and 
asks her friends to rejoice with her. 
So the man with the two sons. It 
is not because he loves the one who 
went away and spent his substance 
with harlots more than he loved the 
one who remained at home, or be- 
cause he approved the conduct of 
the wayward one. But he was lost 
and is found. He comes home 
penitent. He has seen the error of 
his way. He is willing now to 
hear his father, saying make me as 
one of thy hired servants. The 
father did not rejoice that his son 
went astray, but that he comes 
home penitent and begging. Now 
the seventh verse: "I say unto you 
that likewise joy shall be in heaven 
over one sinner that repenteth 
more than over ninety and nine just 
persons, which need no repentance. 
Those in heaven (the Church) do 
not rejoice that men and women 
have sinned, but being sinners they 
do rejoice to see them come, or 
brought home penitent. The son 
who stayed at home did not need to 
repent that he had spent his sub- 
stance with harlots. He had not 
done that. In Matt. 18:12-13. 
How think ye? If a man have an 
hundred sheep, and one of them be 
gone astray, doth he not leave the 
ninety and nine and goeth into the 
mountains and seeketh that which 



ElON'S LANDMARK 



169 



is gone astray. And if so be that 
he find it, verily I say unto you, he 
rejoiceth more over that sheep 
than over the ninety and nine which 
were safe. Now to the extent 
that the Lord's sheep do not stray 
they are just persons and need no 
repentance. One does not need to 
repent of the things of which he is 
not guilty. It is not because those 
members of the church who do not 
go astray are worth less than those 
who do, but the joy in heaven (the 
church) is in seeing the lost ones 
found, the straying ones return 
manifesting the true spirit of re- 
pentance. 

It is the absent ones of the family 
we are the more concerned about, 
pot because they are worth more, 
or that we love them better, but 
just because they are absent, and 
we are anxious for their welfare. 
Hence their safe return gives us 
especial joy. My mother raised 
two daughters and four sons. Some 
one asked her which one of your 
children do you love the most? She 
said, "Always the one who is ab- 
sent." So the church has more joy 
in seeing sinners draw near con- 
fessing their sins, than in seeing the 
self-righteous Pharisee standing 
around criticising and feeling them- 
selves to be just and need no repent- 
ance. And they also have especial 
joy in seeing those who have 
strayed from the fold come home 
self-abased and asking only a ser- 
vant's place. The straying son was 
his father's child as was the one 
who remained at home. The one 
who stayed at home was doubtless 
a comfort to his father every day, 
while the straying one was a source 
of grief. He felt he was lost to 
him, perhaps dead, and now to see 



him return home confessing his 
guilt and shame, it of course gave 
him joy that he could not express 
in any other way so well as to kill 
the fatted calf and clothe him in 
the best robe, (full and free for- 
giveness) and put a ring upon his 
hand, an emblem of his endless 
love. The son who stayed home is 
not appreciated less, but the return 
of the wandering one has filled the 
bosom of the father full to over- 
flowing, and hence the blaze of joy 
and merry-making. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



THE WICKED ARE NOT TO BE 
ANNIHILATED. 

A dear friend, who claims to be- 
lieve in Christ, but it seems he does 
not believe the word of truth, says 
that death is the end of the law, 
and as the wages of sin is death, 
that when wicked men die they are 
annihilated ; for being made sinners 
by the disobedience of another man, 
a just and righteous God would not 
punish them everlastingly. 

In his criticism of the word of 
God he would make it false, and his 
own theory true. Now that God's 
ways and thoughts being as far 
above man's ways and thoughts as 
the heavens are above the earth, 
man will utterly fail, from a human 
viewpoint to measure any of Je- 
hovah's covenant will and purposes. 

God's Word, not man's opinion 
should be the basis of all evidence 
that the wicked "shall go away into 
everlasting punishment." Matt. 
XXV. :46; and shall be cast "into 
the fire that never shall be quench- 
ed; where their worm dieth not 
and the fire is not quenched." Mark 
IX:43, 44. Man will admit that 
these are scriptural expressions but 
his unbelief holds that those scrip- 



170 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



tures are metaphorical, and had 
reference to the fires, which an- 
cient Jews kept burning near Jeru- 
salem to burn up the garbage and 
the bodies of people, who were 
executed, called the Valley of Ge- 
henna. 

I would not question that God's 
denunciations are clothed in figura- 
tive speech; but does that teach 
that they are meaningless? It is 
true, that the word "forever," Exo- 
dus XXI :6, and "everlasting," Le- 
viticus XVI :34, are used in refer- 
ence to persons in that generation. 
But in every place where the expres- 
sions "ever," "everlasting," "for- 
ever," or "forever and ever" are 
used in reference to God, to Heav- 
en, to hell, to the punishment of 
the wicked or joys of the righteous 
after death, they mean an endless 
eternity. Such expressions are no- 
where used in the New Testament 
in regard to time things, as "the 
son of God abideth forever," John 
VI:51; "to whom is reserved the 
blackness forever," Jude 13; "com- 
mandment of the everlasting God," 
Rom. XVI :26. Now, who would 
believe those expressions, "The Son 
abideth forever," and "everlasting 
God," should be used in a limited 
sense? Or these, "God who liveth 
forever and ever," (Rev. XV :7) ; 
"They shall reign forever and 
ever" (Rev. XXII : 5) ; "The smoke 
of .their torment ascendeth forever 
and ever" (Rev. XVI :11) ; "The 
devil shall be tormented forever and 
ever" (Rev. XX:10). Here we see 
the same expressions, "forever and 
ever" that refer to God and the 
joys of the saints are used to set 
forth the punishment of the wicked. 
The learned tell us the same root 
word is used in each quotation. 



Again, if the following references 
are inspired of God the wicked 
shall suffer in all eternity. Matt. 
X, 28; XXV, 41, 46; Mark IX, 
43-48; John III, 36; Luke IX, 19-31; 
2 Thess. I, 6-10; Rev. XIV, 11; 
XIX, 20; XX, 4, 14, 15; XXI, 8; 
XXII, 11. With the Bible open 
one would have as much evidence 
to believe that those who have the 
hope of eternal life from the prom- 
ise of Him who cannot lie and the 
everlasting joys, can only mean un- 
til death or short time afterward, 
as he can that the wicked who are 
promised to be punished with "ev- 
erlasting punishment" in torment 
"forever and ever" can mean a re- 
stricted futurity. 

I grant there may be such a pun- 
ishment for the devil and his angels 
says objector, but it would not be 
just for human beings. God's word 
replies, "But the fearful and un- 
believing and abominable, and 
murderers, and whore-mongers and 
sorcerers, and idolaters, and liars, 
shall have their part in the lake 
that burneth with fire and brim- 
stone, which is the second death, 
XXI, 8. The second death cannot 
be construed to mean annihilation. 
However, the following scriptures 
are relied on to bolster such a 
theory: "But the wicked shall per- 
ish and the enemies of the Lord 
shall be as the fat of the lambs; 
they shall be consumed; into smoke 
shall they be consumed away," 
Psalms XXXVII, 20: "The wicked 
shall not be; yea thou shall dili- 
gently consider his place, and it 
shall not be," Psalms XXXVII, 10. 
It is true these quotations have the 
foreshadowing of the wicked being 
destroyed; but the context shows 
they were to perish "out of the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



171 



land," and destroyed "from among 
the people, but nowhere says in a 
lake of fire after death, when they 
shall have been judged out of those 
things written in the books accord- 
ing to their works, being cast into 
a lake of fire to exist "forever" 
from the presence of God. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



MRS. AMANDA MOORE GOFF 
It is with a sad heart, I will attempt to 
write the death of my dear mother, who 
departed this life, September 23, 1927, 
making her stay on earth, 61 years, 9 
months, and 11 days. 

She was born in Wilson County, De- 
cember 12, 1865 and was married to B. F. 
Goff of Edgecombe County, October 12, 
1887. They lived together nearly forty 
years. I know there has never lived a 
more faithful wife, and devoted mother 
than she was. She was a kind neighbor, 
and always doing something for the wel- 
fare of her community. The weather was 
never too bad, nor was she ever too tired 
to go in the time of need. "To know 
her was to love her." 

So hard, so hard, to break the ties, 
That love has bound together, 
So hard to speak the words, 
We must part forever. 

But we weep not as those without hope 
for the Christian lite she led will always 
be a guiding star to heaven. Her faith 
in God was strong. She bore her afflic- 
tions with patience. As she was walking 
through the valley of the shadow of death 
she feared no evil. 

She was always bright and had a com- 
forting word for every one when in trou- 
ble. She was loved by all who knew her. 
But since it has been God's will to take 
her we must be submissive, ever looking 
unto Him for all things and may each of 
us follow her example and if it is God's 
will meet her in the great beyond. 

She joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Autrey's Creek under the preaching of 
Elder Isaac Jones and was baptized first 
Sunday in October 1920, by Elder A. M. 
Crisp. Mother was a faithful member, 
and was always longing to see the time 
when she could go to her church. She 
loved all the brethren and sisters and de- 
voted her life to the Heavenly Father. 

She was taken with apoplexy three 
weeks before her death, and was soon 
able to be up, and went to see all her chil- 
dren before the fatal stroke the 22nd 
of September, which lasted only a few 
hours. Oh, how shocking to us, for we 
did not realize the end was so near, hav- 
ing called our family physician, he as- 



sured us she would soon be well again, 
but we should not weep for it was her 
wish not to be down sick long. God knew 
best, and we must reconcile ourselves to 
His will, for "He doeth all things well." 

The funeral service was conducted at 
her home near Fountain, N. C, by Elder 

A. M. Crisp, and she was laid to rest in 
the Fountain Cemetery. There was a 
mound of beautiful floral offerings placed 
on her grave, as the last tribute of love 
and respect that friends and relatives 
could pay her, there were many people 
gathered at the grave side to see her sweet 
face for the last time. 

She is survived by her loving husband, 

B. F. Goff, two sons, five daughters, and 
a loving sister, R. L. and B. C. Goff of 
Fountain, N. C, Mrs. John T. Gardner of 
Farmville, N. C, Mrs. W. D. Baker, Mrs. 
W. J. Beaman and Mrs. H. F. Owens of 
Fountain, N. C. and Mrs. Elisha Dilda of 
Walstonburg, N. O, and sister, Mrs. J. B. 
Speight of Fountain, N. C. 

Sleep on dear mother, 
And take your rest, 
God called you home, 
He knew best. 

The golden gates were open, 
A gentle voice said come, 
And with farewells unspoken 
You calmly entered home. 

Why God has taken you from us, 
We cannot understand, 
But. He needed another angel, 
To complete His holy band. 

In our hearts your memory lingers, 
Sweetly, tenderly, kind and true, 
There is not a day, dear mother, 
That we do not think of you. 

In silence you suffered, 
With Patience you bore, 
Until God called you home 
To suffer no more. 

So sleep on, dear Mother 
And we that are here, 
Will wait for the day, 
That we may join you there. 

Written by a heart broken daughter, 
Mrs. John T. Gardner, 
Farmville, N. C. 



FRANCIS MARION SUTTON 

Francis Marion Sutton was born in 
Miami county, Ohio, April 5, 1839. He 
was the son of David and Lucinda Wilson 
Sutton. David Sutton was born in Vir- 
ginia, where his father was born and 
where his grandfather, Joshua Sutton 
had settled. 

F. M. Sutton was one of nine children 
born to David and Lucinda Sutton. The 
family emigrated to Montgomery county, 
Ind., in 1850 where the deceased grew to 



172 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



manhood. He was a graduate of Wesley 
Academy and attended Wabash College. 
On March 26, 1863, he was married to 
Elizabeth Marshall Shanklin. Two chil- 
dren were born to this union: Lillie M., 
now Mrs. E. E. Kelley, and Bessie L., who 
became the wife of A. W. Webb, of Toron- 
to, Kansas, and died in 1904. Mr. Sutton 
taught school in his younger days, and 
was county superintendent of schools of 
Warren county, Ind. He read law in the 
office of James McCabe, afterward a judge 
of the supreme court of Indiana. In 1887 
Mr. Sutton and family moved to Toronto, 
Kansas, where he was engaged in the prac- 
tice of law until 1924, when he closed his 
office on account of the continued illness 
of his wife, and came to Garden City in 
September of that year, where they made 
their home with Mrs. Kelly until taken by 
death. 

Mr. Sutton was a member of the Primi- 
tive Baptist church and for the past 35 
years was an ordained elder of the church, 
preaching to various congregations of the 
church in southeast Kansas as called upon 
to do so. Since coming to Garden City he 
has, on several occasions, preached for 
Primitive Baptist meetings in southwest 
Kansas and southeast Colorado. 

He lived a life of usefulness and ser- 
vice. In southeast Kansas he was known 
as a lawyer of sound judgment and wise 
counsel. As a preacher he was an able 
exponent of the doctrines of his church. 
He was upright in life and always was 
devoted to his family and found his great- 
est happiness in family associations. 

Though he was almost 91 years old, his 
mental faculties remained unimpaired un- 
til last Saturday, when he passed into 
unconscious sleep which lasted until Tues- 
day evening, when he passed from earthly 
to eternal life. 

He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. E. 
E. Kelley, eight grandchildren, and eight 
great-grandchildren. 



ELDER W. M. MONSEES 

Whereas, Brother W. M. Monsees, the 
beloved and highly esteemed pastor of the 
church at Concord, Washington County, 
N. C, passed away on date unknown to 
the writer as we were only notified of his 
death. He is not dead but has fallen 
asleep in Jesus, and resting in sweet peace 
to wake at the sound of the trump when 
all the redeemed shall be fashioned like 
the glorious body of Christ Jesus and 
dressed in a robe of righteousness to sing 
praises throughout eternity to the God 
which he has so beautifully held up as a 
Saviour and a whole Saviour, one who 
doeth all things well and according to his 
own purpose. 

Brother Monsees was a wonderful man. 
Amid his afflictions he was alway cheer- 
ful, no one for complaining. He said ev- 
ery one had their own troubles and why 
should he burden the other fellow with 
his troubles. 



He has been pastor of our church for 
quite awhile and was true and dutiful, 
never missing appointments without leave 
of the church. So I feel like he is on 
the train that he so beautifully portrayed 
in the old Concord church some years ago 
before his afflictions came on. He had a 
great influence in the building of a new 
house at this place which he was blest 
to visit one time only, and to preach on 
the 4th Saturday and Sunday in Septem- 
ber, 19 29, together with T. C. West of 
Tarboro and W. M. Styron of Cedar Island 
and he with all others present did enjoy 
it so much. 

'Twas heaven below 

The Redeemer to know, 

And the angels could do nothing more, 

Than to fall at his feet 

And the story repeat, 

And the Saviour of Sinners adore. 

We wish to bow in humble submission 
to the will of an all wise God who doeth 
all things well, feeling our loss to be his 
eternal gain. 

Written by a poor sinner, trusting in an 
all wise God for redemption. 

MRS. M. E. AMBROSE 



W. W. HOUSE 

The death of our dear father and uncle 
has brought sadness in the church, in the 
home and community. We deeply feel 
the loss of one who was so faithful in all 
his duties. His seat in the church was 
never vacant if it were possible for him to 
be there. One of his chief joys was sing- 
ing the sweet song of Zion and talking of 
the goodness and mercy of God. He ob- 
tained a sweet hope in early life and 
united with the church at Flat Swamp in 
1879. His faith was strong in the doc- 
trine of salvation by grace and always 
followed the old path, the good old way 
which alone brings peace in the church of 
God. 

Father had been afflicted with heart 
trouble for several years and always bore 
his suffering with great patience. He 
gently fell asleep on February 22, 1929. 
He was born Jan. 10, 1855, was thrice 
married. First to Susan Emily Jones, 
who was the mother of his ten children, 
five preceding him to the grave. After 
her death he married Mrs. Lucy Warren. 
She only lived a few years. He then 
married Mrs. Sarah Leggett. She with 
his five children, 27 grandchildren are left 
to mourn the loss of a dear companion 
and father for surely there was never a 
better in his home and community. His 
honest, truthful, upright life speaks for 
itself. He was so devoted to his wives. 
Each one of them were members of the 
dear old Baptist Church and were ever 
ready to stand by him in every trial and 
do all for him that loving, faithful wives 
could do. 

We grieve not for him without hope, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



173 



for we feel assured that he has now enter- 
ed into that rest that remains to the peo- 
ple of God. 

His funeral services were conducted in 
the home by his pastor Elder J. N. Roger- 
son, assisted by Elders B. S. Cowin, W. E. 
Grimes, Tilman Sawyer, S. B. Denny and 
S. L. Ross, who all spoke comforting 
words to the bereaved family and friends. 
His body was taken to the family burying 
ground and placed beside his first wife, 
there to await the resurrection morn. 

The large crowd and many beautiful 
flowers which covered his grave shows the 
high esteem in which he was held. 

His son, E. C. House, and 

Niece, Caddie House, 

Eld. J. N. Rogerson, Moderator, 

E. C. House, Clerk. 



GERTIE JONES 

The people of God never die but fall 
asleep in His arms. Such I truly believe 
was the case of this dear sister for she 
lived a shining example of the goodness 
of God. She showed her faith by her 
works, ever filling her seat at her church 
when possible always with a kind word 
and pleasant smile for every one. 

She was born Oct. 22, 1861 and was 
married to S. M. Jones Nov. 15, 1882. To 
this union were born 11 children, 4 of 
whom preceded her to the grave, leaving 
her husband, seven children and many 
relatives and friends to mourn her loss. 

She united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Flat Swamp, November 1902 
and was a true and faithful member until 
her death on January 16, 1930. She was 
taken with a deep cold, and in a few days 
developed pneumonia. All that a dear 
husband, children, doctors and nurses 
could do could not stay the hand of death. 

Funeral servises were conducted at her 
home by her pastor Elder John N. Roger- 
son, assisted by Elders W. E. Grimes, 
E. L. Cobb and S. B. Denny, her son-in- 
law J. P. Harris and Mr. Melton of Nor- 
folk, Va., also made comforting remarks, 
after which her body was taken to the 
family cemetery for interment there to 
await the call of the Master. The large 
crowd and many floral offerings showed 
the high esteem the people had for her. 

Dearest sister thou hast left us, 
And your loss we deeply feel 
But 'tis God who has bereft us 
He can all our sorrows heal. 

Peaceful be thy silent slumber, 
Peaceful in the grave so low 
Thou no more will join our number 
Thou no more our songs shall know. 

LUCY WILLIAMS 
Done by order of conference, Saturday 
before first Sunday in February, 1930. 

W. E. GRIMES, Moderator 
E. C. HOUSE, Clerk. 



DELLA HOUSE ALLSBROOK 
By request of a member of her family, 
I shall attempt to write the obituary of 
my aunt, Delia House Allsbrook. 

The subject of this sketch was born 
February 10, 1851 and died December 
24, 1929 making her stay on earth 78 
years, 10 months, 14 days. She was the 
daughter of the late William and Amanda 
House. She was married in early woman- 
hood to Ben Ira Allsbrook, November 27, 
1867, and unto this union were born 
thirteen children, seven of which preceded 
her to the grave, four having died in in- 
fancy and three lived to be grown, then 
died. Her husband also having died Jan- 
uary 10, 1921, leaving her an invalid 
widow. 

She united with the church at Kehukee 
Saturday before the third Sunday in March 
1874, and was baptized the following 
Sunday with her mother, father and hus- 
band, by her pastor Elder A. J. Moore. 

I have visited her home all my life and 
I have never known a more faithful wife 
nor mother than she was to her family. In 
training and managing her children she 
always tried to teach them higher and 
purer ideals in life, looking ever unto God 
who is the author and finisher of her 
faith. 

It can truthfully be said of her she was 
as faithful to her church and in serving 
her God as she was to her family, always 
filling her seat unless Providentially hin- 
dered. We shall miss you at church as 
well as at home. Your seat is vacant but 
your sweet memory lives in our hearts. A 
place is vacant in your home that never 
can be filled but the precious example at 
home and in church, the wise counsel you 
have given will ever be to us a beacon 
light of good things to come. So many 
times during preaching she was seen with 
the tears streaming down her cheeks, an 
evidence that the gospel she was hearing 
preached was a great feast to her hungry 
soul. 

In May 1915 she had a great fall which 
made her an invalid the rest of her life. 
And for a year or two before her death 
she became so blind she could not see to 
do anything. She often spoke of herself 
as a poor blind beggar. She was a great 
sufferer, but patient and strong in the 
faith until the end. After her husabnd's 
death she made her home among her 
children. She leaves to mourn her de- 
parture three daughters and three sons: 
Mrs. C. H. Bell and D. N. Allsbrook of 
Norfolk, Mrs. Wiley Cherry and B. I. 
Allsbrook of Rocky Mount, Mrs. Walter 
Cherry of Tarboro and Sherwood Alls- 
brook of Scotland Neck, three brothers 
W. R. and Allie House of Scotland Neck, 
Osco House of Speed, one sister, Mrs. W. 
J. Briley of Wilson, several grandchildren 
and a host of relatives and friends. 

She died at her daughter's, Mrs. Wiley 
Cherry, Christmas Eve night about ten 
o'clock. Her body was brought to Scot- 



174 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



land Neck Christmas day and laid to rest 
in the Baptist cemetery by her husband. 
The funeral was conducted by her pastor, 
Elder A. B. Denson, who spoke very com- 
fortingly to the bereaved family, assisted 
by the Presbyterian minister, Rev. Wilson 
of Tarboro. 

We feel our loss is her eternal gain, and 
we mourn not for her as one for whom 
we have no hope. We believe she is rest- 
ing in the sweet Paradise of God, and she 
believed in that glorious doctrine Salva- 
tion by Grace. We feel that the days of 
her suffering and mourning are ended, 
and she has gone to God to receive that 
crown He has promised to give unto 
those who keep His faith. 

The large crowd and beautiful floral 
offerings attested the love and high esteem 
in which she was held. 

Written by her niece, 

Mary Delia White 



THOMAS F. HOIilDTA 

I met him first if I remember right in 
the spring of 1880, and for many years 
was very intimately associated with him. 
I served the church of his membership 
for about twelve years, have been in his 
home and in his neighborhood many 
times and feel that I knew him well. He 
was a true, noble man who so lived as to 
have the respect and confidence of all 
who knew him. His brother and he ran 
a coach business many years ago, and 
the stamp of Holidia Brothers was a guar- 
antee of good quality. 

He was a good husband, a kind father 
and faithful friend to all about him. He 
was a member of the church at Bethlehem 
in Tyrrell County, N. C, where I first 
met him. After I began to visit his 
church somewhat regularly he got into 
much trouble of mind and so great was 
the trouble that he showed it in his man- 
ner and conversation and many of his 
friends not being able to understand why 
so good a man should be so troubled fear- 
ed that he was going to lose his mind. At 
Communion meeting he would ask the 
church to excuse him, saying: "Brethren 
I have nothing against any of you, it is all 
in myself." They would excuse him for 
all loved him, and knew that he was an 
honest man. While this was going on his 
brother joined the church. Elder J. I. 
Ambrose baptized him. (I was present.) 
And when his brother and Elder Ambrose 
came out of the water he met them and 
asked Elder Ambrose to baptize him. He 
took him in and baptized him, but his 
trouble continued for quite awhile after 
this, and his conviction for sin was so 
deep and pungent that it was pitiful to 
hear him tell of it, but he presently found 
relief in a blessed hope in Jesus. In the 
meantime I had been called as pastor of 
the church and Brother Holidia was im- 
pressed to join the church and be bap- 
tized, but feared he said that he was 
making a mock of the sacred ordinance. 



But such were his impressions and unrest 
that finally he came before the church as 
though he had never been a member, told 
his experience, said that when he was 
baptized the first time he had never been 
convicted for sin, that he had not received 
a hope when baptized the second time. 
And now having received a precious hope 
in Christ, he wanted to be baptized in his 
dear name, if the church would allow it. 
The church very willingly agreed, and so 
the next day I baptized him, and Brother 
Holidia enjoyed his church privileges and 
fellowship and there was no more signs 
of his losing his mind. He was a ready 
and willing talker on the subject of relig- 
ion and was a useful member of the 
church, helping his pastor both spiritually 
and financially, and in the absence of a 
preacher conducting the meetings. His 
gift was mostly in prayer. His honesty 
as a man and his devotion as a Christian 
won for him the confidence of all, and 
now he is gone but he yet speaketh, and 
his bereaved widow, Sister Holidia, her 
sons and her daughters have much to be 
thankful for the life of their husband and 
Father, and from the standpoint of the 
scriptures may confidently look forward 
to the time when his mortal body which 
they put in the earth will come forth im- 
mortal and in the image of that Jesus, 
whom he loved and trusted, to be forever 
with the Lord. 

His one time pastor, 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



MRS. S. M, JONES 

In loving remembrance of this dear sis- 
ter and neighbor, Gertrude Whichard 
Jones, I will write a few lines concerning 
her life. 

To know her was to love her. She was 
the only daughter of Willis Whichard and 
wife, Martha Congleton Whichard, born 
Oct. 22, 1861 and died Jan. 16, 1930 mak- 
ing her 68 years and three months old. 
She leaves to mourn a good husband and 
seven lovely and obedient children, Mrs. 
V. A. Ward, Robersonviile, N. C; Mrs. J. 
P. Harris, Beaufort, N. C. ; Dr. Paul Jones, 
Farmville, N. O; Willis R. Jones, Balti- 
more, Md.; Mrs. Will Spencer, Raleigh, 
N. C; Mrs. S. S. Farabow, Varina, N. C; 
Miss Olive Jones, Bethel, N. C, a step- 
mother, Mrs. Amanda Whichard; and 
four brothers, Claude, Will, Walter and 
Roy Whichard. She was a member of the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Flat Swamp. 
They have lost one of their best members, 
few her equal and none her superior. 

I have heard her say so many times that 
when she could not wait on herself she 
hoped the Lord would take her and He 
granted her wishes. She was in bed two 
weeks with pneumonia in both lungs and 
never complained of anything. We would 
ask her and she would say that nothing 
hurt her. I asked her a few mornings 
before she died how she was and she said 
"I am well." I told her I knew all was 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



175 



well with her and she said it was. The 
next morning she asked me to kiss her, 
twice. I said "I know you are still trust- 
ing in the Lord and He is near, so near 
that you can almost touch the hem of His 
garment." She was growing very weak 
but said "He is all in all to me." She had 
been feeble for about three years. We 
weep, but not as one without hope for the 
Christian life she lived will always be a 
guiding star to heaven. Her faith in God 
was strong but since it has been God's 
will to take her, we must be submissive to 
His will, ever looking unto Him for all 
things. May each of us follow her ex- 
ample. 

Her pastor, Elder John Rogerson spoke 
comforting words of her beautiful life at 
the funeral. Also Elders W. E. Grimes, 
E. L. Cobb and S. B. Denny. 

Her journey thru life is ended 
Her work here on earth is all done 
And now she's at home with her Savior 
With a battle well fought and a victory 
won. 

Written by one who loved her, 
Mrs. Mollie Staton. 



W. R. HOUSE. 

About the hour of noon Feb. 13th. the 
death angel entered the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. R. House ad claimed for its vic- 
tim, "Uncle Bob" as he was familiarly 
called, not only by his nieces and nephews, 
but a number of others not even related 
to him. I do not feel that I can do jus- 
tice to such a noble and God fearing man 
as I knew him to be. 

He was born February 22nd, 1855, 
making his stay on earth 74 years 11 
months, 22 days. He was the son of Wil- 
liam and Amanda House, was married to 
Lydia Taylor, February 22nd, 1877 and 
unto this union was born one son, Eddie, 
who died about the age of two. 

Although they had no children of their 
own, they raised four other children, 
namely: Messrs. Spencer Wommack, John 
Davis, Mrs. Don Hyman and Miss Susie 
Shields. He joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Kehukee 3rd Saturday in Janu- 
ary, 1882 and was baptized by his pastor 
Eklrr A. J. Moore. He remained a true 
and faithful member of this church until 
his death. He will be greatly missed in 
all of his churches, especially the home 
church, he took such an interest in his 
meetings, always filling his seat unless 
providentially hindered. To serve God 
and his family was joy of his life. He 
was a good neighbor, kind, generous and 
loving husband. I have visited his home 
all of my life and I have never known a 
more devoted couple than Uncle Bob and 
Aunt Lydia. Their lives were so closely 
united whenever you saw one, the other 
was close by. The love, devotion and 
companionship between them was beau- 
tiful. 



He was afflicted for several years be- 
fore his death, and the last year of his 
life he could not walk without assistance. 
His daily prayers were that Lydia should 
out live him, for he know there would be 
no one to care for him as tenderly and 
kindly as she. It comes to me just here 
to remark of her faith in God, when she 
saw he was going in her heart she was 
comforted to know his prayer was being 
answered, that he might go first. She 
waited on him night and day without 
a murmur. 

He was taken sick Sunday before he 
died Thursday. All was done for him that 
loving hands, kind friends, and a skilled 
physician could do, but nothing could stay 
the icy hand of death. 

We shall miss you at church as well as 
at home. Your seat is vacant, but your 
sweet memory lives in our hearts. A 
place is vacant in your home which never 
can be filled, but the precious example at 
home and in church, the wise council you 
have given will ever be to us a beacon of 
god things to come. He leaves to mourn 
his departure his bereaved widow, one 
sister, Mrs. W. J. Briley of Wilson, two 
brothers, Albert and Oscar House of Speed 
several nieces and nephews, a host of rel- 
atives and freinds. We feel our loss is 
his eternal gain. We believe he is rest- 
ing in the sweet paradise of God, for he 
believed in that glorious doctrine, "Salva- 
tion by Grace." We feel his suffering 
and mourning are over, and his Spirit has 
taken its flight to God who gave it. He 
has gone to live with his blessed Redeem- 
er on high. "Where sickness, sorrow, 
pain and death are felt and feared no 
more." 

The pall bearers were his nephews: 
John House, Willis Briley of Wilson, B. 
J. Allsbrook of Rocky Mount, Sherwood 
Allsbrook, Sidney White, Dick, Arthur 
and Oscar House of Scotland Neck. 

The funeral services were held in the 
home by his pastor Elder A. B. Denson, 
who spoke very comforting to the be- 
reaved. The Baptist choir sang sweetly, 
"Jesus Lover of My Soul," "How Firm a 
Foundation," and "Asleep in Jesus." The 
body was taken to Kehukee Cemetery and 
laid to rest, to await the morning of the 
resurrection when it shall "be raised and 
made like that of Jesus. 

The large crowd and beautiful floral 
offering attested the love and high esteem 
in which he was held. 

Written by his niece, 

Mary Delia White. 



MRS. VIRGINIA E. SPIVEY 

It is with a sad and aching heart that 
I attempt to write a few lines in memory 
of my dear mother who departed this life 
December 29, 1929. 

She was born in Martin County, N. C, 
May 17, 1859, being the oldest daughter 
of Richard A. and Lucinda Manning. She 
had one brother and one. sister, both 



176 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



preceding her to the grave several years 
ago. 

She was united in marriage to C. H. 
Spivey, November 7, 1877 and unto this 
union seven children were born, six 
daughters and one son. The son died in 
infancy, and one daughter died in young 
womanhood. 

She left a devoted husband, C. H. 
Spivey, five daughters, Mrs. Annie E. 
Combs, Mrs. Lillie Taylor, Mrs. Edna Lee 
Adcock, Mrs. Maud Bryant, and Mrs. Em- 
ma Lewis, one adopted son, Theodore For- 
est Spivey, sixteen grandchildren and 
three great grand children, to mourn their 
loss. 

She united with the church at Wil- 
liams the third Saturday in September, 
1886 and was baptised with her husband 
the following day, by Elder J. W. John- 
son. She remained a faithful member, 
filling her place always unless providen- 
tially hindered. 

She was very active until last April. 
She was taken sick and began to get more 
feeble as the summer waned and the last 
of August she took her bed to never arise 
again. For four months she suffered un- 
told agony ,an dall that physicians' skill, 
nurses and loving hands could do was 
done, but to no avail. The Master called 
and she had to answer it and leave us. 
Amid a large gathering of sorrowing 
friends and relatives she was laid to rest 
at Williams Cemetery. Burial services 
were held by Elder J. C. Moore, her pas- 
tor, and Elder W .B. Denson of Rocky Mt. 

She was a true wife and mother, and we 
her loved ones shall miss her as such, 
and the church has lost an humble, faith- 
ful member but our loss is her gain for 
we believe she is safe in the arms of Jesus, 
where there will be neither sorrow, pain, 
nor death. 

May God bless and keep her loved ones 
on earth and let them so live that each 
and every one of us may meet her and the 
Master around that great white throne. 

God doeth all things well. Blessed be 
His holy name. 

Written by her daughter, 

Mrs. Annie E. Combs. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION, 
ETC., REQUESTED BY THE 
ACT OF CONGRESS OF 
AUGUST 24, 1912 

Of the Zion's Landmark, published 
twice a month, at Wilson, N. C, April 1, 
1930. 

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

COUNTY OF WILSON. 



Before me, a Notary Public for the 
State and County aforesaid, personally ap- 



peared John D. Gold, who, having been 
duly sworn according to law, deposes and 
says that he is the Business Manager of 
the Zion's Landmark and that the follow- 
ing is, to the best of his knowledge and 
belief, a true statement of the ownerahlp, 
management (and if a daily paper, the 
circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publi- 
cation for the date shown in the above 
caption, required by the Act of August 
24, 1912 embodied in section 443, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the re- 
verse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publisher, editor, managing editor, 
and business managers are: 

Publisher P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 

Editors, O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C; S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C; M. L. 
Gilbert, Dade City, Fla., and Joshua T. 
Rowe, Baltimore, Md. 

Business Manager, John D. Gold, Wil- 
son, N. C. 

2. That the owners are: P. D. Gold 
Publishing Co., John D. Gold. 

3. That the known bondholders, mort- 
gagees, and other security holders owning 
or holding 1 per cent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or other se- 
curities are: First National Bank, L. S. 
Hadley. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, 
giving the names of the owners, stockhold- 
ers, and security holders, if any, contain 
not only the list of stockholders and se- 
curity holders as they appear upon the 
books of the company but also, in cases 
where the stockholders or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company 
as trustee or in any other fiduciary rela- 
tion, the name of the person or corpora- 
tion for whom such trustee is acting, is 
given; also that the said two paragraphs 
contain statements embracing affiant's 
full knowledge and belief as to the cir- 
cumstances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who do 
not appear upon the books of the company 
as trustees, hold stock and securities in a 
capacity other than that of a bona fide 
owner; and this affiant has no reason to 
believe than any other person, association, 
or corporation has any interest direct or 
other securities than as so stated by him. 

JOHN D. GOLD, 
Sworn to and subscribed to before me 
this 14th day of April, 1930. 

ELIZABETH S. CLARKE, 
Notary Public. 
My Commission expires April 18, 1931. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

AT = 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIH. MAY 1, 1930 No. 12 



ELIJAH SHOWS HIMSELF TO AHAB. 



And it came to pass after many days, that the word of the Lord came 
to Elijah in the third year, saying, Go shew thyself unto Ahab; and I will 
send rain upon the earth. 

And Elijah went to shew himself unto Ahab. And there was sore 
famine in Samaria. 

And Ahab called Obadiah which was the governor of his house. 

(Now Obadiah feared the Lord greatly: 

For it was so, when Jezebel cut off the prophets of the Lord, that 
Obadiah took an hundred prophets and hid them by fifty in a cave, and 
fed them with bread and water.) 

So they divided the land between them, to pass throughout it: and 
Ahab went one way by himself, and Obadiah went another Avay by him- 
self. 

And as Obadiah was in the way, behold Elijah met him: and He knew 
tiim and fell on his face and said, Art thou that my Lord Elijah? 

And he answered him I am; go tell thy lord Behold Elijah is here. 

And he said, what have I sinned that thou wouldst deliver thy servant 
into the hand of Ahab, to slay me? 

And Elijah said, as the Lord of hosts liveth, before whom I stand I will 
surely shew myself unto him today." — 1 Kings 18:1-15. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER If. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



The Purpose of Zion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in. 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and frie* ds are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communictions, busines* letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Eton's Slanbmark 

2)ev>otet> to the Cause of ^esus Christ 



PUBLICATION REQUESTED. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

This enclosed poem was memor- 
ized by a reader of Zion's Land- 
mark 47 years ago. It was publish- 
ed then in your columns. We won- 
dered if you would republish it. If 
not please return same. My father, 
Eld. J. M. Adams is too afflicted to 
write but asked me to send this 
to you. He still lives in the faith 
once delivered to the saints and has 
many sweet meditations. It 
grieved him to hear of the loss of 
your father and others. 

I am respectfully, 

Mrs. G. W. Peters. 

Monroe, Ga. 



I will tell you a few things which 
have passed through my mind, 

To you as good people, I feel now 
inclined, 

Whilst Christians are searching, 
their duty to know 

The Devil is busy his work to pur- 
sue. 

A wolf in sheep's clothing, he's 

seeking you. harm, 
A cloak of hypocrisy covers his 

form, 

A hoodwink he has to put over your 
eyes, 

He shows you his wonders set forth 
in disguise, 

A kind hearted creature he profess- 
es to be 

And greatly desires us all to be free. 
He draws forth your feeling with 
sermons and books, 



And robs all your pockets with 

sanctified looks. 
He is the spirit which tempted old 
Eve 

And his work ever since has been 

to deceive. 
He comes to the church with his 

sympathies great, 
Stands up in boldness in matters of 

State, 

Extensive benevolence he doth pro- 
fess 

For people and nations that are in 
distress, 

A light to the heathens he longs to 
extend, 

And begs hard for money his Gos- 
pel to send. 

He sheds many tears and heaves 
many groans, 

See how with great sympathy o'er 
them he moans, 

He will rave and exhort and his 
note he will swell, 

The heathen are dying and going 
to Hell. 

And when to the height of his pas- 
sion he got 
He will send his sub-agents around 

with the hat. 
Come brothers and sisters, come 

open your store 
And give to the Lord and he will 

bless you with more. 
Such preachers he sends forth all 

over the world 
To gather up dimes with banners 

unfurled. 
To assure them success he gives 

them a hook 



178 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



And sends them a fishing with 

God's Holy Book. 
So neat are they clad, so bright do 

they shine 
One surely would think them quite 

truly divine, 
But deceivers you find them, wolves 

in disguise 
And known by their bleating for 

money their cries. 
Another great genius quite lately 

arose, 

In whom this benevolent spirit all 
flows, 

To relieve unfortunate drunkards of 
rum, 

We are told they call him the tem- 
perance Son. 
A father he has or he has a son, 
For nothing finished that never 
begun, 

God's not his father from record we 
see, 

A father he has and the Devil is he. 
His mother the Harlot of Rome we 
conceive, 

She gives her babe suck all his 

wants to relieve, 
She calls good teachers for her lit- 
tle sonny, 
Benevolent preachers who come 

for the money. 
With coats made of broadcloth and 

buttons that shine, 
With shoeboots and leggings and 

linens most fine, 
These teachers go forth but strange, 

strange to tell, 
They all take the sheep shears, a 

bag and a bell. 
When all put together and taken 

as one, 

Societies, Missions and Temperance 
Son, 

They constitute wholly to stop at 
the least, 

The body and spirit of John's Sec- 
ond Beast. 



HOW WE LEARN OBEDIENCE. 

We learn obedience through and 
by the things we suffer. The scrip- 
ture tells us "if ye know my will 
and do it not, ye shall be beaten 
with many stripes." Now I believe 
that every true child of God is a 
witness to this truth. They have 
or will learn it is through trials and 
tribulations that we enter into the 
kingdom. One poet has said, 
"Shall I be carried to the skies on 
flowery beds of ease, while others 
fought to win the prize and sailed 
through bloody seas?" The child 
of God has many sore conflicts to 
endure, and were it not for the 
sweet promises of our redeemer we 
could never endure. But the Lord 
knows our every need. He works 
and none can hinder. He sends 
the sun and the rain at the time 
most needed and suited to our case. 
When we come to the dark river of 
woe feeling all our hopes of every- 
thing are lost, then it is that the 
Lord appears to us with some sweet 
promise that revives our drooping 
hearts and makes us to sing the 
song; Redeeming Love has been my 
theme and shall be till I die. We 
are taken away awhile from every 
cumbering care, and made to love, 
praise and adore the God that is 
able to do all things. When a per- 
son gets so low down in feeling 
that he is made to see himself a 
lost and ruined sinner in His sight, 
and all earthly comforts have gone, 
then he is in a position to pray and 
his prayer is this, "Lord have mercy 
on me." "Lord remember me this 
one." This was Sampson's prayer 
the last hours of his life. And 
many has been the times that I 
have repeated these precious words 
and oh how many, many times the 
Lord has come to my rescue. The 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



179 



more suffering we do, the more 
praying we have to do, for we learn 
from experience we are weak and 
very weak and too, we learn more 
and more of the power and knowl- 
edge of God. There is no prayer 
so faint that He can't and don't 
hear, (real prayer) . There is no 
wound or bruise that he can't heal. 
No matter how dark and stormy 
the night may be, if the Lord ap- 
pears there is glory and rejoicing. 
"I'll be a wall of fire round about 
you and the glory in the midst." 
Now this is a safe place to be. 
Satan with all his stumbling stones 
can't thwart one single purpose of 
the Almighty God. Although he 
goes just as far as possible, but the 
Lord don't suffer Satan to go but 
just so far and then no further. 
(Aren't you glad of that?) He gets 
a big hold on a lot of us that could 
do better. Now there is no such 
thing as a Primitive Baptist doing 
anything wrong that comes along 
and not suffer for it. Because af- 
ter being called out of darkness 
into His marvelous light we are 
commanded to walk worthy of the 
vocation wherewith He has called 
us, laying aside all malice and 
hatred and press forward, and if 
we do this we have a fearful look- 
ing forward to of fiery indignations 
to devour the adversary. 

The child of God no doubt but 
every one of them has or will suf- 
fer the very depths of bitterness 
and woe and the heighth of joy, 
comfort and peace. When the 
Lord withdraws his presence so 
that we are not able to recall one 
promise or one bit of light, then 
we can say with one of old, "that 
surely the Lord has forgotten to be 
gracious, but He knows just how, 
when and what we need. When 



we get this low down we are at the 
end of our strength and then it is 
when we call upon His holy name, 
and say with the poet, "Return O 
holy dove, return, sweet messenger 
of rest. I hate the sins that made 
thee mourn and drove thee from 
my breast." 

The greatest lesson that has ever 
been taught was the lesson that 
Jonah learned when he was cast in 
the sea, because he refused to 
preach the unsearchable riches of 
Christ, after the Lord had com- 
manded him. But the Lord pre- 
pared the whale to swallow him 
that he might be saved and not 
drowned. And in three days the 
whale vomited him up on land. 
After such a wonderful experience 
Jonah could say "Salvation is of 
the Lord." For he knew no human 
could have prepared the whale and 
had him in the exact spot to get 
Jonah before he was drowned, 
neither could any human keep him 
alive in the whale for three days, 
and the greatest of all, brought him 
safe to shore. 

"My soul repeats his praise 
whose mercies are so great." These 
words are very fitting to a poor 
sinner who has been called out of 
darkness into His marvelous light, 
who feels to be the least of all 
saints, and yet the Lord has so 
graciously condescended to his low 
estate, and has taken his feet out 
of an horrible pit, out of the miry 
clay, and established his goings, 
and put a new song in his mouth. 
David realized this when he said, 
"Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all 
that is within me, Bless His holy 
name. Who forgiveth all thine in- 
iquities, who healeth all thy dis- 
eases: who redeemeth thy life from 
destruction; who crowneth thee 



180 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



with loving kindness and tender 
mercies." Psalms 1-3-4-103. "He 
will not always chide; neither will 
he keep his anger forever," 9th 
verse. In reading Psalms we 
gather the fact that David was very 
much afflicted, and realized some- 
thing of his low estate. Therefore 
he was a praying character. He 
knew something of God's goodness 
and mercy, and we find him contin- 
ually begging the Lord for mercy. 
"As a hart panteth after the water 
brook, so panteth my soul after 
thee, O God." 1-42 Psalm. There 
were times with David that he felt 
that the Lord had forgotten to be 
gracious. "My God, my God, why 
hast thou forsaken me? Why art 
thou so far from helping me, and 
from the words of my roarings. 
1-22 Psalm. While there were 
times that he felt to say, "The Lord 
is my shepherd." 

David was a blessed man, even 
though he was afflicted. For the 
children of God need afflictions to 
keep them down at a sovereign 
throne of grace. We need the 
bitter things of life, before we can 
be thankful for the sweet. One 
poet has said, "The bud may have 
a bitter taste, but sweet will be the 
flower." If I know anything 
about the experience of the child 
of God, they have just such a one 
as David did. They are made to 
cry in the wilderness for bread. 
Their prayer is the same as David's. 
"Lord be merciful, forsake me 
not." David prayed night and 
day. So does the little weary, 
fainting child of God that has no 
other place of refuge. No other 
place can rest be found. David 
said, "I waited patiently for the 
Lord, and He heard my cry. He 
established my goings and put a 



new song in my mouth. Even 
praise to my God." Oh, I had 
rather have such an experience 
than to have the god of Opher or 
the cattle of a thousand hills. What 
would it be worth without this 
hope. For all of this world's rich- 
es end with this life, and how short 
it is! Therefore, dear child of God, 
"Despise not thou, the chastening 
of the Lord, for whom the Lord 
loves he chastens," I for one feel 
to say that suffering and affliction, 
though they seem severe, are better 
for us than prosperity. For they 
keep us down in an humble state 
of mind. We are in a state to 
pray, and when the awful suffer- 
ings are made lighter we are in a 
state to praise God from who all 
blessings flow. 

This world is a wonderful place 
to live in, were it not for so much 
sin. The Lord has placed every 
single useful, pleasant and beautifu 1 
thing that human mind could at- 
tain to. The world is so full of in- 
terest that it seems that all humans 
could be content, but they are not. 
Even though we have hardships, 
we have enough blessings to over- 
balance them. If we could and 
would look at it in that light, es- 
pecially the little child of God that 
has a hope in the Lord Jesus Christ. 
What more could we wish for than 
to feel that "the Lord is my Shep- 
herd." What a wonderful con- 
soling promise it is to have a resting 
place beyond this vale of tears. To 
feel as one of old. I know that my 
redeemer lives. I have the sweet 
hope treasured up in this heart of 
mine that Jesus suffered, bled, and 
died on the rugged tree of the cross 
for my sins. If so, when done with 
this life, I'll be through suffering 
and sin, and be at rest in that man- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



181 



sion above, where all is peace and 
joy and love. I desire the prayers 
of those who feel so impressed. 
Pray that I might be faithful and 
dutiful in every respect. 

With love, 

Annie Hooks. 



EXPERIENCE. 

The following is an experience 
by brother W. E. Davis, who was a 
native of Anson County, N. C, but 
who for a number of years prior to 
his death lived in Georgia. He 
addressed his letter to his father 
and other relatives in Anson Coun- 
ty and some of them yet living, 
request the same published in the 
Landmark. 

J. W. Jones 

Peachland, N. C. 



The letter follows: 
Dear father, brothers and sisters: 

The subject on my mind, and 
has been for some time is now, to 
write to you on the charge I passed 
through last November, while my 
brother John was visiting North 
Carolina. I had been in trouble 
over my sinful condition for twenty 
seven years. I did not know what 
was the matter with me, but it 
pleased the good Lord to remove 
my trouble and great burden last 
November. At that time, happy 
as any poor mortal that ever lived 
and this happy condition lasted sev- 
eral weeks. I joined the church 
third Sunday in following Decem- 
ber and was baptized. Before the 
change, I cannot describe to you 
what a condition I was in. About 
1878, the year I moved to Georgia, 
I was in a settlement of old Primi- 
tive Baptists, but I did not believe 
their doctrine. I was determined 
not to believe it. I was among 



strangers of course but strange to 
say, before I knew or could help it, 
I was believing every word of their 
doctrine and my faith in them 
grows stronger and stronger — un- 
til now I believe I know its the 
truth. For six or eight years be- 
fore this change it seemed I could 
hardly live nor die. I did not want 
to go to meeting and could not stay 
away. I would go off to the woods 
all times of nights seeking some 
secret place to beg for mercy, but 
my condition only seemed to get 
worse. I felt like I did not have 
a friend on earth or in heaven. I 
felt to be the worst person on earth. 
Some people noticed my desolate 
condition and said it was the Lord's 
work but this I did not believe. If 
so, why was I doing as I was. I 
often tried to hide my troubles. I 
then set my head to quit going to 
meeting and thereby overpower my 
bad feelings. So I refused to go to 
meeting for three months, but the 
strokes seemed to come heavier 
than ever in spite of me or what I 
did. Again I went to meeting but 
no relief day or night. Then, as I 
had often done before, I requested 
Nannie to pray for me, as I was in 
a most awful condition and then 
when it seemed I must die, the 
first thing I knew, I was made as 
happy as I could be and found my- 
self giving the Lord all the praise 
for my happy change. I could not 
help from praising him, for my 
heavy load of sin and condemna- 
tion was gone. Everything calm 
and serene and not a thing bother- 
ing me, and I felt clear of sin and 
thought I would never sin again. 
What a happy state instead of my 
former misery. I felt, should I 
live a thousand years all should 
be spent in praising the dear Lord 



182 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



for His goodness and mercy. Then 
I wanted to join the church and be 
baptized. Meeting time was three 
weeks off but I did not feel like I 
could wait. I went to see Elder 
Stanford and told him my feelings. 
He and I had a good meeting to- 
gether. If any of you have been 
where I have been, you understand 
just what I mean and understand 
me. No tongue can ever tell it all, 
but you who have had such experi- 
ence know what it is. I don't think 
I am guessing for I feel to know it 
is so. I know there was a great 
change in me and I hope it was by 
the good spirit. The Lord's work 
is a lasting and perfect work. By 
grace are ye saved. 

The world does not believe in 
salvation by grace. The change 
from nature to grace convinces us 
that salvation is of the Lord. This 
is an experience I shall never for- 
get. I was taught that I was help- 
less and without God or hope and 
that in my flesh was no good thing 
and that I was a mass of sin and 
corruption and could not of myself 
please God. God is a spirit and 
must be worshipped in spirit. There 
is no life in the law, otherwise 
Christ Jesus would not have had 
to die to redeem us from the curse 
of the law. If I am a child of God 
my life is hid with Christ in God. 
I have not said all I wanted to say 
for the half has never been told 
but I hope some of you my dear 
kin people in the flesh have ex- 
perienced some of what I have 
hinted at and let us keep our bodies 
in subjection for there is yet sin in 
our mortal bodies, for often we do 
not do as we should because of the 
weakness of the flesh. 

(Signed) W. E. DAVIS. 
Lindale, Ga. 



EXPERIENCE. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I have intended for some time to 
write a small sketch of my experi- 
ences in life. I am one of the 
Daughters of the Confederacy. I 
now have neither father, mother, 
sister, brother, nor husband living. 
My dear father, Iven J. Shivers, 
was slaughtered on the battlefield 
at Bunker Hill. He left my mother 
on the loom bench with me only 8 
months old, to volunteer in the 
army for the south, in the Civil 
War. He was seriously wounded 
at or near Bunker church at Bun- 
ker Hill and was taken to the hos- 
pital. He died three weeks later. 
He is buried in Mt. Olive cemetery, 
Frederick City, Maryland in a line 
with eight hundred or more of his 
soldier comrades. A neat marble 
slab with his name engraved upon 
it, marks the spot where he was 
laid by hands, unknown to his dear 
little family. His wife, her maiden 
name being Miss Mary Jane An- 
drews, and his three little children, 
my brother, Frank Shiver, buried 
in Maplewood cemetery at Kinston, 
N. C, my sister, Mary Ann Shivers, 
buried in Onslow County, near Rich- 
land, N. C, and myself. I feel per- 
fectly happy about them all as they 
received a hope and died in the 
Lord, I am sure by their walk in 
life. I have letters from my father 
to my mother bearing these words: 
Wife, wife, raise my three children 
honest and true and educate them 
and prepare to meet me in heaven 
for I can never come to you on 
earth, but I am at peace with God 
and all mankind. I am ready and 
waiting to go. You see this left 
me in the world, fatherless of my 
earthly father, but with a heavenly 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



18:5 



father that has ever cared for me 
through all time. 

I married William Dixon Hous- 
ton in the year 1880. My relatives 
were practically all Primitive Bap- 
tists and I desired to be one, but 
felt so unworthy. Soon after I 
was married I joined the Free Will 
Baptist Church and continued 7 
years with them, a miserable life. 
I was not at home. I had many 
dreams. Jesus appeared to me in 
one and asked me to go with him. 
I said, "I can't go, I am so weak 
and unworthy." He said, "I am 
going to give my people their 
punishment here and after death 
their troubles are over." In an- 
other dream I was at the foot of a 
mountain and two beautiful lambs 
came down that mountain after 
me and turned and went back up 
looking back after me and bleating 
just as far as I could see them and 
I rendered no excuse. Something 
was continually calling me and I 
wanted to go but I felt like a poor 
cast-away. I went to Sand Hills 
to quarter^ meeting. Old Brother 
Jimmie Cavenough was pastor. The 
time came for me to go. They 
were singing those words. I knew 
if I stayed away I must forever die. 
I went and was received. Five 
weeks later I was baptized and 
have been satisfied in confessing 
the faith since my husband had 
never been a member but he al- 
ways was so faithful to go with me, 
but he expressed a hope fully as 
early as I did, but was very quiet 
about it, until the time came for 
him to join us. He came as a little 
child, too, I am sure. 

I had some kind of a stroke the 
last Wednesday in last March and 
haven't walked a bit since, only 



when I hold to something or get 
around a little on a wheel chair. 
But God's sheep know his voice 
and they wander for a while, but 
He knows His own and will gather 
them in in His own good time and 
give them their crowns and com- 
fort without pay or price. 

I lived with Sister Sallie Petway 
twelve months when I was a girl 
and I loved her. She is now living 
in Florida if she is not dead. She 
wrote her experience to the Land- 
mark. It was so much comfort to 
me. Her address is, Postoffice 
Box 1372, Tampa, Fla. Please send 
her a copy containing this. I have 
suffered much in life. I have 8 
living children and 2 dead ones, 
5 sons and 3 daughters and a large 
number of grandchildren. 

Dear Brother Gold, publish this 
in Zion's Landmark and send Sister 
Sallie Petway a copy for poor un- 
worthy me, if you see fit, for if I 
am saved at all, I am saved by grace 
and not of any good thing I have 
done within myself for it is God 
that worketh within, both to will 
and to do, lest any one should boast 
of their good works to their human- 
ity surroundings. I want all true 
Primitive Baptists to pray for a 
poor little unworthy sister in the 
Lord, I hope, and as the poet says, 
"Jehovah is a God of light. He 
formed the earth, He built the skies 
and what He speaks is surely right; 
the strength of Israel will not lie." 

Sarah Catherine Houston, 
Hallsville, N. C. 
R. F. D. No. 1, Box 39. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

Elder J. D. Vass has changed his place 
of residence from Galax, Va., to Fancy 
Gap, Va. 



184 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



EXPERIENCE. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I am nearly seventy-six years old 
and am quite feeble, though I am 
able to be up and about and have 
many things to be thankful for. I 
had good kind parents. My mo- 
ther joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Stewart's Creek when I 
was a small boy and was baptized 
by my grandfather, Elder John 
Jones. I joined the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church in my thirty-third year 
at the same place and was baptized 
by Elder Isaac Webb. These are 
things that have been long remem- 
bered by me, a poor unworthy sin- 
ner, yet I feel that I am precious in 
His sight. He has done so much 
for me I feel like I want to glorify 
His great and grand name. 

My father, John J. Jones, had a 
good hope for thirty years before 
he joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Union and was baptized 
by Elder M. J. Harrison. He served 
as deacon there for some years up 
to his death. My step-mother was 
a noble and Christian woman. She 
joined at Union also. They all 
lived good Christian lives up to 
their death. There were twelve of 
us children, eight boys and four 
girls. There are only three of us 
living now, Brother T. A. Jones, 
sister Eliza Keyes and myself. Sis- 
ter Eliza is the wife of Elder J. A. 
Keyes. While some of my broth- 
ers and sisters never did join the 
Church I have been made to feel 
and believe that they were all 
saved. I am satisfied that my wife 
and the two of my children that are 
dead were saved, and also the eight 
living ones will be saved. 

It was made manifest to me years 
ago that all of my children shall be 



saved, the last one of them. I 
praised the Lord aloud. I could 
not keep quiet. I have many other 
relatives, both living and dead who 
were and are members of the 
Church and some outside that have 
a good hope, through grace. 

I was raised in Surry County and 
have lived in Rockingham and 
Guilford. I have attended many 
Church meetings and Associations 
and have met many of the dear bro- 
thers, sisters and friends in the 
different sections which was a very 
precious privilege. To be blessed 
to meet so many of the dear ones 
here on earth, many of whom are 
gone on before to the Glory World 
where all is love, joy and peace for- 
evermore. I hope to be blessed to 
meet them again in the "Sweet Bye 
and Bye." 

Yours in hope of that blessed im- 
mortality. 

J. R. JONES, 
Rockford, N. C. 
Route 1, Box 74. 



ENJOYED HIS TRIP. 

Elder S. B. Denny, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Brother: 

I want to say through the Land- 
mark that I feel very thankful to 
the Lord that I was blest to fill all 
my appointments in N. C. And I 
have i"^a«ion to hope that it t. *• a 
comfort to th« brethrea, and to tk« 
glory of God. Judging from the 
many kind and comforting «xpres- 
sions of the brethren, I have reason 
to hope that my labor was not in 
vain in the Lord. 

I especially enjoyed the monthly 
meeting at Scott's church on 1st Sat- 
urday and Sunday, when on Satur- 
day after preaching four came for- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



185 



ward and told what great things 
the Lord had done for them, and 
were received into the fellowship 
of the church, and were baptized 
Sunday morning in Contentnea 
Creek by you. This baptism was 
witnessed by many brethren and 
friends, and I felt that the Lord is 
blessing your labor at that place. I 
was also glad to be at the Falls 
Church Saturday and Second Sun- 
day. Elder Denson is serving this 
church, and they seem to be in a 
healthy condition. I especially en- 
joyed the Communion Service, the 
largest I ever attended except it 
was a union meeting. 

I also enjoyed the singing at this 
church, as well as at other church- 
es. I think it should be encour- 
aged, as it is a very important part 
of the worship. "Singing and mak- 
ing melody in your heart to the 
Lord."— Eph. 5:19. 

I was also at Contentnea Church 
on Saturday and 3rd Sunday. Elder 
George Boswell is serving them. He 
is a faithful servant of the Lord, al- 
though he is not as active as he has 
been, having suffered a stroke of 
paralysis a few years ago. Yet he 
is faithful in serving his churches, 
and is held in high esteem by the 
brethren and the community at 
large. 

I also visited the churches that 
are under the care of Elder A. M. 
Crisp. He is also held in high es- 
teem among the brethren, and "has 
a good report of them that are 
without." I especially enjoyed the 
hospitality of the brethren, not only 
in their kind homes, but conveying 
me from one appointment to an- 
other. 

I am sorry that the lack of space 
forbids me to mention the names of 



all the brethren who showed me 
kindness, but I assure you that I 
am very thankful, and will say, 
"The eyes of the Lord are in every 
place, beholding the evil and the 
good." 

In hope of eternal life, 

J. E. HERNDON, 
R. 2, Danville, Va. 



A COMFORTING LETTER. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend: 

Please find enclosed a good let- 
ter from a precious sister, Sister 
Bertie Williamson. She is a sister 
to Elder S. B. Denny's wife. They 
are worthy members of the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church. I surely was 
glad to get her good letter. As I 
have been to the hospital and had 
an operation I have not been able 
to attend church but very little for 
three months. Such good letters 
from her and others make me feel 
like the Comforter has come in a 
time of great need. 

Yours in hope, 

J. R. JONES, 

Rockford, N. C. 



Dear Brother Jones: 

As I went into church today and 
saw your seat but not you, I prom- 
ised myself to write you a few 
lines at least. 

I was absent last meeting, as we 
stayed in Tarboro S weeks. We re- 
turned 11th of January. Had a nice 
visit with mama. She was wtll. 

Brother King preached so ably 
today. His text was Isaiah, 61st 
chapter and the first three verses, 
I believe. He spoke of mourning 
being turned into joy, etc. 

When he sat down Brother Hill 
got up and said Brother King had 
spoken of a certain God, and he was 



186 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



glad he was there and heard him. 
It was all so sweet. Brother Hill 
was sick with a cold and did not 
stand long. 

Mr. Crim said Brother King 
preached a good sermon last night. 
I was not present. 

Brother King went home with 
Miss Rosa and Miss Bertha Brooks 
for dinner today. I thought it was 
nice for them to have him. Mrs. 
King did not come this time. There 
was so much snow and, too, Bro- 
ther King said his brother's baby 
was sick. They were afraid it was 
pneumonia. 

Sister Norman and Annie Milton 
were there. They brought us 
home. Sister Norman's pretty sis- 
ter and family, Mrs. Strickland, 
you remember her, were there. Bro- 
ther Charlie Gold was present, too. 
In fact there was a large crowd. 

Hope you will be able to be pres- 
ent before long. The union is to 
meet here the 5th Sunday in March. 
Brother Fagg wants to visit us soon, 
it was announced by Brother Hill. 
I hope he will soon come. Brother 
Fagg has been sick, I saw in the 
Landmark. 

Hope you are still improving and 
up and going as usual. Mr. Wil- 
liamson has just walked down to 
the postoffice. The day is about 
done. It has been a pleasant one. 

All good wishes for you, 

Bertie Harris Williamson. 
706 Walker Ave., 
Greensboro, N. C. 



A SWEET SPIRIT. 

Mr. H. L. Brake, 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Dear Bro. Brake: 

Since I have learned through the 
Landmark of your afflictions you 
have been constantly on my mind. 



I have always had the utmost con- 
fidence in your religion. You bear 
the marks of a child of God and I 
feel that God will give you sustain- 
ing grace for every trial. Pray for 
me that I may live as you have, so 
when afflictions come to me I may 
feel as you have expressed it. There 
is something good in being sick. 
Those were sweet words to me. 
Such a sweet spirit of reconcilia- 
tion. I hope if it can be the Lord's 
will you will again be able to 
mingle with the brethren which 
has been your chief joy. It has 
been my greatest pleasure in life. I 
joined the church when I was fif- 
teen years old. I am now nearly 
fifty-nine. I have never grown 
tired. It is a sweet resting place 
to me, and when afflictions befall 
me, and I can't attend my church, 
I hope the Lord will put it in the 
hearts of my brethren and sisters to 
visit me, for I can easily see how 
they can do without me, but I 
can't do without them. 

With love to you and family, I 
remain your little sister, 

Willie Raper Strickland, 
Fremont, N. C. 



A GOOD MEETING. 

Elder Roberts and wife, 
Greenville, N. C. 
My dear pastor: 

I have been wanting to write you 
ever since Brother West came this 
morning. He told me about the 
good meeting you had Saturday 
and Sunday. It made me feel glad 
and thankful within my poor soul, 
for if I know my poor heart, it does 
me good to learn of good meetings 
at our churches everywhere. Oh, 
how I long for sweet fellowship 
among our people. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



187 



Brother Roberts, I wasn't well 
and the roads were very bad. I 
was sore all in my muscles and I 
didn't feel that I could drive the 
Ford on those bad roads. I have 
always wanted to fill my seat. I 
f 3el that it is my duty and all the 
other members, too. It is encour- 
aging to our pastors. I know it 
makes them feel better than to 
preach to empty seats. I do de- 
sire to do my duty and hold out 
faithful to the end. Then I hope 
to hear the joyful sound of the 
heavenly Father saying, "child, 
your Father calls, come home." 
The greatest pleasure this world 
affords is to go and hear the glad 
tidings from the kingdom of our 
God. 

Oh, Brother Roberts, I am so 
glad that I love the doctrine you so 
beautifully preach. The first Sun- 
day I was in church I could exclaim 
with the poet, "I need not go 
abroad for joy. I have a feast at 
home." I want you to know that 
I love that meek and humble spirit 
that you are so blessed with of the 
Lord. I feel the good Lord is 
richly blessing you with His won- 
derful message from above to de- 
liver to His people. We want you 
to know we love and esteem you 
greatly, for the sake of the Cause. 

Oh, I feel that there are some 
who are praying true prayers to 
our blessed Saviour for the welfare 
of Zion. I feel thankful He has 
taught me that He is God and that 
besides Him there is no God. He 
speaks and it is done. The wind 
and the sea obey His command. 
He is too pure and holy to be un- 
kind. I would love to honor and 
adore Him all the days of my life, 
but I am here in the tabernacle of 



flesh and sin is mixed with all I do. 

Brother West said that he hoped 
that you would be with us at our 
next prayer meeting at Sister 
Coker's next Sunday night. She 
told me to tell you to come. She 
will be very glad to have you, and 
wants to see you very much. I 
surely hope you can come. 

I will come to a close. I didn't 
intend to write all of this. I hope 
you will pardon all mistakes and 
pray for me when at a throne of 
Grace. 

Billie joins me with love to you 
and Sister Roberts. 

A very little sister, 
LULA H. HYMAN, 

Tarboro, N. C. 



READING LANDMARK MANY 
YEARS. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Bro. : 

Enclosed find check to pay on 
my subscritpion and as I see so 
many expressing their appreciation 
for the Landmark I wish to say that 
I have been reading it for a long 
time. I will be 74 years old if I 
live till the 25th day of this month 
and my mother used to read it way 
back in the 70's when old sister R. 
Anna Phillips wrote for it. I re- 
member Elder Leland's sermon at 
the rich widow's house and a great 
many others. I learned to love it 
and I have been reading it 
nearly ever since and I hope to read 
it as long as I stay here. May the 
household of faith ever remember 
me at a throne of grace. 

S. A. Goolsby. 
Stokesdale, N. C. 



188 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



LETTER FROM ELDER TRENT. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend: 

Please find enclosed a good let- 
ter from Elder G. M. Trent of 
Reidsville, N. C We spent many 
pleasant moments together while I 
lived at Reidsville and also since at 
different times. 

There has been something among 
our people that has caused much 
sorrow and grief but I feel, as I 
hope, from the depths of my heart 
and thank God that I am not for- 
gotten by the dear brethren and 
other precious ones. 

Yours in hope, 

J. R. Jones, 
Route No. 1, Box 74, 
Rockford, N. C. 



The Letter. 

Mr. J. R. Jones, 
Dear Brother: 

I am sure you will be surprised 
to hear from me. I wanted to come 
to see you while in the hospital but 
was providentially hindered and 
when I did go you were gone home 
with your brother, which I was 
glad to know. I am hoping you 
are getting on well and will be able 
to come and see us again. My wife 
hasn't been very well this year. She 
has just got out of bed. The past 
two days she has been up trying to 
help me with the work. 

I have been sick ever since Tues- 
day after the last third Monday. I 
had to get out of bed to take care 
of my wife. I am not well yet, 
though I am intending to go to my 
meeting as usual, if the Lord is 
willing and we keep up and well. 
As we had a good meeting last 
time, a young man about 20 years 
old joined, I am looking for another 



this time. I am trusting that the 
blessed Lord will still prosper my 
labors as long as it is His will for 
me to serve them. 

I often think of you and the trav- 
els with you for my church and 
your seeing so many added to the 
church. Dear brother, you have 
been a most wonderful blessing, for 
the blessed Lord to show you so 
much and then to see it come as it 
was revealed to you. Dear bro- 
ther, my days are about over. I 
shall soon have to lay this armor 
by and leave all these things be- 
hind. I am not so much interested 
in the things of this life as I have 
been. The church and its welfare 
is what I am mostly concerned 
about and as the scripture says, 
"looking forward to the hearenly 
and divine things, which are far 
better." I am making this too 
long. Excuse my bad writing and 
spelling. May the Lord continue 
his blessings to you. Remember 
me at a throne of grace. 

Your friend and brother, I hope, 
G. M. Trent. 

Reidsville, N. C. 



IN NEED. 

Dear Readers of the Landmark: 

My mother has been operated 
on for cancer of the breast, and as 
God would have it she is getting 
along fine. 

Times are so tight I want to agk 
the dear readers of the Landmark 
that feel able and willing to help 
us in this time of need. If there is 
any one who wishes to help, please 
mail it to, 

Your brother in hope, 

W. A. ARMSTRONG, 
Tarboro, N. C, R. 1. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



189 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

E'der S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIII. No. 12 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, MAY 1, 1930 



ARE WE, AFTER ALL, 
PRIMITIVE BAPTISTS? 

It is rather amusing to read the 
editorial of Elder W. H. Crouse in 
Banner Herald of April 1, issue 
upon the above subject. While he 
exults that his people are progres- 
sive, he repudiates the name, "Pro- 
gressive Baptists," which he says 
their opposers gave them. 

Now, this Elder's people were 
driven out of the Primitive Baptist 
ranks some thirty years ago for 
certain innovations, either progres- 
sive or retrogressive. Evidently 
both. At any rate, this order of 
believers tried to bring into Primi- 
tive Baptist Churches, which had 
been content to remain apostolic in 
faith and order, things that could 
not be tolerated. It is both queer 



and startling news to learn how 
this Editor restablished (?) this 
modern order to their lost estate. 
See! he tells how he did it: "A few 
years ago the Government asked us 
to take the census of our people. 
We did so. It proposed to list 
us as Progressive Primitive. We 
refused to be so listed. It was then 
proposed to put us in with the 
Regular Baptists. This we de- 
clined. Who was responsible for 
such a suggestion we do not know. 
We elected to remain out of the 
census unless we were counted in 
with the Primitive Baptists. This 
was finally done and we have been 
so listed ever since." 

In the first part of the nineteenth 
century the mission spirit and its 
kindred brood sprang up among the 
Primitive Baptists, but it was not 
until 1832 that they finally ex- 
punged that element from them. 

Here and there, some of those 
people are found claiming to be 
Primitive Baptists. Wonder if 
some of the Missionaries, who are 
making such a claim, with all their 
auxiliaries, which were never in the 
Primitive Churches and never will 
be, will try to make them Primitive 
Baptists? 

It is strange that this highly es- 
teemed editor should think to elect 
and denominate people what they 
are not, by saying so, even when 
he knows that his people are hold- 
ing to the same things without re- 
pentance, for which they were non- 
fellowshipped by the Primitive 
Baptists Churches. Since then, 
like other denominations, they have 
introduced other things not held by 
our people equally as offensive. 

Then he quotes the criticism of 
J. B. Cranfill, a Misisonary Bap- 
tist, whose father was a Primitive 



] 90 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Baptist preacher. The Editor 
seems to delight in Cranfill's tirade 
of abuse, misrepresentation and 
ridicule of these people who are 
still holding and contending for the 
apostolic faith and order. He said, 
"No matter how many preachers 
were together on a given Sunday 
they all had to preach." Another 
great fault this religionist found to 
his father's people were that they 
were nearly all anti-prohibitionists 
and Democrats; and said that they 
claimed, "in order to be temperate 
one had to drink a little, some prac- 
ticing more vigorously what they 
preached, exceeded the speed limit, 
or rather drink limit, and later 
along found it necessary to make 
acknowledgement to the church 
and be forgiven." This honorable 
Christian ridiculer of his father's 
church, goes on to say: "The story 
was current after the adjournment 
of the Association that year that 
following the meeting the neigh- 
bors picked up two wagon loads of 
empty whiskey bottles, which J. M. 
Baker, (the pastor) indignantly 
denied, averring that there was 
only one wagon load of whiskey 
bottles." 

Knowing Elder Crouse as I 
thought I did, I was surprised that 
he should quote such stigmas from 
an enemy of all righteousness, but 
the more so, when he should add 
to his "brother" Cranfill's slurs by 
saying, "I have heard them tell 
about ministers who would take a 
drink before going to church, 
claiming it helped them to have 
'the Spirit'." Then he was wont 
to exclaim, "Our people are rated 
as sober as any people on earth. Of 
all the ministers identified with the 
brethren represented by the Ban- 
ner Herald, I know of very few 



who are not ardent prohibitionists." 
This he adds by way of contrast, as 
Mr. Cranfill had in scoffing way 
referred to the old line Primitive 
Baptists; as, "They are nearly all 
anti-prohibitionists and Demo- 
crats." Doubtless those Primitive 
Baptists of forty years ago were 
true men then as now, few being a 
"Hoover-Democrat" — of one party 
yesterday and of another today. I 
am sure our people love the prin- 
ciples of truth, temperance, hon- 
esty and righteousness as well, yea, 
better than other religious denomi- 
nations, even those represented by 
Eld. Crouse, not excepted. Let me 
ever stand for the church of God, 
the pillar and ground of the truth. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



RUBY JEWELL, CLAYTON 

With a sad and broken heart I make 
the attempt to write the death of my dear 
daughter, Jewell. 

She was born Jan. 15, 1908 and died 
July 8, 19 29. Her death was attributed 
to blood poison and a complication of dis- 
eases. 

Jewell was a girl that whatsoever fell 
to be her lot always went well with her. 
She was a dear lover of little children. 
She had great sympathy for anything that 
was afflicted. Although she did not 
make any open profession, I believe she 
was a child of God. I saw a difference 
in her before she was taken sick. AH 
during her sickness she was a patient suf- 
ferer. Before she became unconscious 
she laughed off and on all day. She 
seemed to be perfectly submissive. God 
only knows how heart rendering it is to 
give up a loved one at her age. It is a 
wound that can never be healed. 

I feel that she is sweetly resting, 
where sad partings, sorrows, sickness 
pain, and death are felt and feared no 
more. 

She leaves to mourn their loss mother, 
father, two sisters, and a host of relatives 
and friends. 

Her sweet voice we love is still. Her 
vacancy in our home can never be filled. 
My desire is to meet her in heaven above, 
where all is love. 

Funeral services were conducted by 
C. L. Woods at Eno Primitive Baptist 
church, her body was laid to rest in the 
church cemetery. 

Written by her broken-hearter mother, 
Mrs. C. C. Clayton. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



191 



MRS. EFFIE GILLESPIE 

Mrs. Effie Gillespie was born in Lenoir 
County February 26, 1857, and departed 
this life October 16, 1929. She was hap- 
pily married to Professor D. G. Gillespie 
of Tarboro August 4, 1875 in Wilson, N. 
C, who preceded her to the grave. 

Sister Gillespie began teaching in the 
Tarboro Academy in 1881 and taught 
for more than forty years in the city and 
county schools of Edgecombe county and 
was regarded as one of their most effi- 
cient teachers. 

Sister Gillespie joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church about 1881 and remained 
a faithful and devoted member to her 
death. She held her membership with 
the Little Creek church near Conetoe in 
Edgecombe county and took great delight 
in her church and always filled her seat 
unless providentially hindered. She was 
very kind to every body and wanted to 
administer to their comforts. Sister Gil- 
lespie was a strong believer in the doc- 
trine of salvation by sovereign grace, and 
adorned her profession by an orderly 
walk and a godly conversation. 

Sister Gillespie was tenderly cared for 
during her last illness in the home of her 
son-in-law, Mr. Harry Smith, where her 
lovely daughter Daisy and her grandchil- 
dren administered to her so gently. She 
leaves one brother, Mr. Joshua Rouse, two 
sisters, Mrs. Meniva Vines and Miss Millie 
Rouse, and three grandchildren together 
with a host of friends to mourn her de- 
parture. 

The funeral was conducted by the 
writer in the midst of a large concourse 
of relatives and friends and her body was 
laid to rest in the family burying ground 
near her lovely country home beneath a 
beautiful mound of flowers to await the 
second coming of our gracious Redeemer. 
Written by request, 

S. B. DENNY, 

Wilson, N. C. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas the all wise Heavenly Father 
has seen fit to remove from our midst by 
death, our much beloved sister Lucettie 
Johnson. Sister Johnson was born April 
27, 1846 and died February 6, 1930, mak- 
ing her stay on earth 8 3 years, 9 months 
and 9 days. She joined the church Au- 
gust 14, 1S9 7 and was baptized by her be- 
loved pastor, Elder J. T. Coats. 

Therefore be it resolved that the 
church at Sandy Grove has lost one of its 
best and most highly esteemed members 
and surely a mother in Israel, one that 
never failed to fill her seat as long as she 
was able. 

Second, that we extend our Christian 
sympathy to the bereaved family. 

Whereas the church has lost a faithful 
member, one worthy of our love and re- 
spect, further resolved that we submit a 
copy of these resolutions to the family, 



enter a copy on our church records and 
send a copy to Zion's Landmark for pub- 
lication. 

Done by order of church in conference 
Saturday, February 15, 1930. 

Elder L. H. Stephenson, Moderator 
Alex Dupree, Committee. 
S. L. Ogburn, Committee. 



NANNIE A. KEATON LEAKE 

Nannie A. Keaton Leake was born Aug. 
5th., 1845, and died November 4th, 1929, 
making her stay on earth 84 years, 2 mos. 
and 29 days. When quite young she was 
married to Wm. T. Hopkins, who preceded 
her to the grave, and from this union 
four children survive. These being Mrs. 
Lou Hundley of Danville, Va., Mrs. Joe 
Hundley, of Axton, Va., Mrs. John Strat- 
ton, of Ridgeway, Va., and E. D. Hopkins 
of Cullowee, N. C. 

On the 18th day of July 1876 she was 
married to John Leake who with five chil- 
dren, a host of grandchildren, great- 
grandchildren and great-great-grandchild- 
ren survive her. These children are: 

J. L. Leake of Price, N. C, S. F. Leake 
of High Point, N. C, W. M. Leake of 
Spencer, Va., Mrs. J. W. Eaves of Axton, 
Va., Mrs. W. L. Eaves of Martinsville, 
Va. 

When young she united with the old 
school Baptist Church and lived a life of 
consistent devotion to God, until He saw 
fit to take her to live with Him in that 
good home, she spoke of so often. She 
was a faithful wife, a devoted mother and 
grandmother and will be greatly missed 
by the many friends and relatives who 
loved her so dearly. 

Mrs. L. M. Hundley, 

Danville, Va. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas on the 16th day of December, 
19 29 our Heavenly Father has seen fit to 
call home, our dearly beloved and faith- 
ful brother, T. F. Holidia. 

Resolved: First, That the church at 
Bethlehem Tyrell county sustains a great 
loss in the passing of our dear Brother 
and Father in Israel. 

Second, That we deeply feel the need 
and pray God to give each of us, whose 
hearts are saddened, especially his aged 
and afflicted widow, divine grace as a 
mantle which will overshadow and en 
able us to bow in submission and meekly 
kiss the rod that makes our hearts sore, 
being assured that our loss is his eternal 
gain. 

Third, That we send a copy of these 
resolutions to Zion's Landmark for pub- 
lication. And a copy be on our church 
record. Done by the order of the confer- 
ence. 

March 1st. 1930. 

W. R. HINES, Mod. 
J. B. HOLIDIA, C. C. 



192 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas, it has been the Lord's will to 
remove from us our beloved sister, Geor- 
gia A. Dunn, who departed this life on 
Sept. 29th, 1929, age 76 years. She had 
been a faithful and loving member at 
Red Banks church for about 38 years, al- 
ways filling her seat when not providen- 
tially hindered. While the church has 
lost one of her best members, yet we 
mourn not as those without hope, for we 
feel that our lois is her eternal gain. 
May the Lord of hosts prepare each and 
every one of us to meet her in that beau- 
tiful city beyond the river of death, where 
the saints walk the gold-paved streets, 
clothed in white, and the glory of God and 
the Lamb illume the place, and glad hal- 
lelujahs are sung in sweet never ending 
strains. 

Resolved, 1st, That we bow in humble 
submission to God's just and holy will. 

2nd, That we extend our heart-felt 
sympathy to the bereaved ones, trusting 
that He who does all things well may 
reconcile them to His divine will and 
cause them to try to emulate her life. 

Resolved further that a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to Zion's Landmark for 
publication 

Done by order of Conference 2nd Satur- 
day in March 1910. 

Elder Luther Joyner, Mod. 
J. R. Mills, Assistant Clerk. 
Mrs. Z. R. Gay, Clerk. 
Farmville, N. C. 



LIZZIE HARRISON 

By request I will write the death of 
Sister Lizzie Harrison. She was born 
November S, 1889 in Martin County. She 
wa» the daughter of John J. Roberson and 
Bettie Roberson. 

She joined the Primitive Baptist church 
at Bear Grass third Saturday in June, 
1910 and was baptized Sunday by her 
pastor Elder J. N. Rogers. 

She was married to Walter Harrison, 
March 13, 1912, and to this union seven 
children were born. Five of them survive 
Two died in infancy. 

She died October 24, 1929, making her 
stay on earth 40 years. 

She leaves an aged mother, two sisters, 
Mattie Harrison, Mittie Roberson, of 
Bear Grass, and one brother Dawsie Rob- 
erson of Robersonville. 

She never had an opportunity to attend 
her church regularly on account of her ill 
health. 

When our days on earth are over, 
And from all afflictions we are free, 
We hope to land on that bright shore 
And join to praiee with thee. 

Written by her aunt by marriage, 
MILLIE STALLS. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas it has been the will of our 
heavenly Father to remove from us our 
clear and much loved sister, Delia Alls- 
brook, it is with great sorrow of soul, we 
say "Thy Will O Lord, not ours be done." 

Resolved, 

1st, That we extend our heartfelt sym- 
pathy to the bereaved family. 

2nd, That we put a record of this on 
our church books. 

3rd, That we send a copy to Zion's 
Landmark for publication.. 

Done by order of the church at Kehukee 
Saturday before third Sunday in January, 
1930. 

A. B. DENSON, Moderator 
WILLIE RIDDICK, Clerk. 



MISS JOSEPHINE BUNTING 

In memory of our sister, Josephine 
Bunting, who departed this life on the 
13th day of February, 1930. 

She joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Flat Swamp on the first Saturday in 
November 1902, some years after, she 
moved her membership to the Church of 
Rogersonville for convenience. 

Resolved First: That we bow in humble 
submission to that God who is able to 
give and able to tak away. 

Second: That we extend our sympathy 
to the bereaved family. 

Third: That a copy of these resolutions 
be placed on our Church book and a copy 
sent to Zions Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of the Church in Con- 
ference Saturday March 1, 19 30. 

B. S. Cowin, Moderator 

W. E. Robertson, 

J. L. Robertson, Committee. 



ELDER BEN MARTIN 

Please publish in the May the first issue 
of Landmark the following appointments 
for Elder Ben Martin, of Burlington, N. C. 

Upper Town Creek, May the 17th and 
18th, 3rd Saturday and Sunday. 

Elm City., Sunday night the 18th at 
7:30. 

Falls of Tar River, Monday the 19th. 
Autrey's Creek, Tuesday the 20th. 
White Oak, Wednesday the 21st. 
Contentnea, Thursday the 22nd. 
Lower Black Creek, Friday the 23rd. 
Aycocks, Sat. and Sunday, 24th and 
25th. 

Wilson, Sunday night, 25th. 

Yours very truly, 
E. L. COBB. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 



WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA * % if 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL c* A PT*5T 



VOL. LVIII 

1 ^i'M 



MAY 15, 1925 



No. 13 



MY JOURNEY'S END 



"I must travel the miles till the journey is done, ' 

Whatsoever the turny of the way. 
I shall bring up at last at the set of the sun, 

And shall rest at the close of the day. 

Let me deal as I journey with foeman and friend 

In a way that no mall can assail, 
And find nothing but peace at the roadway's last bend, 

When I come to the end of the trail. 

We are brothers who travel a great, common road, 

And the journey is easy for none. 
We must succor the weary and lift on the load 

Of the pilgrim whose courage is done. 

Let me deal with them each on my way to the West 
With a mercy that never shall fail, 

And lie down to my dreams with a conscience at rest 
When I come to the end of the trail." 



P. G. LESTER, Editor Roanoke, Va. 

Associate Editors 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT „________Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER C. F. DENNY 21 Wilson, N. C. 



The Purpose of Zion's 
Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it. When you can always send money order 
or check, or draft, or registered letter, or by express. 

If the money sent has not been receipted, please inform me 
of it. When you can always send money by money order or 
check, or draft, or registered letter, or by express. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All overs of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be mutiplied to all lovers of 
truth. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO. 

Wilson, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST 



EXPERIENCE OF P. D. GOLD 

(Continued from Last Issue) 

It was on Saturday before the 
2nd Sunday in March, 1870, at O'd 
Kehukee church, and at the old M. 
H. and I went and told them but 
little, for I have never been able to 
express my travai. in f jll. They re- 
ceived me into th< t church, anl on 
the next day Elder C. B. Hassell, a 
most precious brother to me, bap- 
tised me. It was in the same stream 
of water and ihe same place that I 
had bapt'sed many when a Mission- 
ary Baptist, and ma:y of them were 
present to behold this stoop. The 
time had been when this would 
have been an intolerable disgrace. 
But that day it appeared to me that 
I was as a dead man, so quiet and 
peaceful and so restful. Glory was 
everywhere and peace and love. It 
was on that day that the words that 
had been burdening my mind so 
long "Wherefore come out from 
among them," etc., were used by me 
as a text. It did not seem to me as 
preaching but the sweetest ease 
and relief, as the long pent up mat- 
ter was emptied and I felt so re- 
freshed. That text has never since 
burdened my mind. . 

After being received into the 
fellowship of the church I visited 
my father's section, and Ihere was 
a little church of the Piimitive Bap- 
tist faith in the neighborhood in 
which Eder Drury Robbins had liv- 
ed and died. A seed had been 
sown there and a remnant was pre- 



served. My mother heard me speak 
though she and my father had both 
gone off with the New School or 
Missionary Baptists. When she 
heard me she said, Son, you preach 
as they did when I was baptised, 
and I desire to live with you. She 
was received there on a confession 
of faith and her former baptism. 
Some time aftsr this she and my fa- 
ther were in Wilson, and when he 
heard the preaching and saw the or- 
der of worship of the Primitive 
people here, he said it carried him 
back to the days when he was bap- 
tised, for it wns like that, and he 
desired fellowship w th us and was 
also received on confession of faith. 
My grandfathers and grandmoth- 
ers on each side of the family were 
also Primitive Baptists, and thus my 
father's God is I hope my God. "My 
father's God and I will exalt him:" ' 
Ex. 15:2 Who is the God of Abra- 
ham, Isaac a^d Jacob and the Lord 
of our fathers? It is the God and 
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the 
Father of glory, and the God of all 
comfort. Him I desire to worship 
and serve. What a blessed mystery 
to be a son of God, born of God and 
identified with, and related to the 
whole house of Israel. 

There was then another matter 
that was unfolded in my exper- 
ience, it was the case of what is 
called the prodigal son. I was that 
prodigal that had come home, been 
brought home and "the fatted calf 
was slain, the ring of love was on 
my hand, the garment of praise had 



194 



zion's landmark 



covered me, then was feasting, mu- 
sic and dancing in my soul. This 
lasted months. Why cannot one re- 
main in that blessed estate of love, 
feasting and obedience for lif 
What a sweet life it looks like it 
would be. -But alas, we leave our 
first love and coldness, doubts, bar- 
renness and trouble set in. 

One vary prominsnt question that 
much exercised my mind for years 
was the nature and extent of the 
atonement made by Jesus Christ. 
The Arminians claim an unlimited, 
general atonement and say they 
preach free grace and free salva- 
tion which they charge the Prim- 
itive Baptists do truly believe and 
preach an unlimited atonement, 
and the Arminians can scarcely be 
said to preach any atonement at 
all. For the Primitive Baptists 
preach that no power on earth or 
in hell can prevent the salvation of 
the sheep for Whom Christ laid 
down his precious life. For all pow- 
er both in heaven and on earth is in 
his hands, and he has power over 
all flesh to give eternal life to as 
many as the Father has given him. 
But those who preach that many 
for whom Christ died are eternally 
lost do certainly limit his aton- 
ment. While those that preach 
that Christ hath forever perfected 
them that are sanctified, by the one 
offering of himself once, do preach 
an unlimited atonement. That is we 
hold that so effectual and perfect is 
the atonement of Jesus, the price 
that he paid down for the redemp- 
tion of sinners, that nothing shall 
ever prevent the coming to him of 
any or all those for whom Jesus 
died. 

The Arminians preacn what they 
call an universal atonement, but it 



is really no atonement at all. It is 
dependent on conditions to be per- 
formed by man that S3 fetter and 
clog their so called atonement of 
Jesus that many things controlled 
by man may defeat it, or render it 
ineffectual. It is left with the crea- 
ture altogether whether he will re- 
pent or not. If he does not, al- 
though Christ did as much for him 
as he did for any other that is ac- 
tually saved ye will never be saved. 
They hold that Christ died as much 
for all that are finally lost as he did 
for any that are saved. Whether 
the heathen are saved depends on 
many contingencies such as wheth- 
er covetous man will give monoy to 
send the gospel there and then 
whether any go to preach to them, 
and then whether the heathen will 
repent and believe not, and furth- 
er, whether they will live a godly 
life and none of these things are at 
all made certain by the death and 
resurrection of Jesus; , but all are 
dependent on the creature. Now ac- 
cording to th ; s where, is any guar- 
antee or certainty in the atonement 
of Christ or the salvation of any 
one? Is this not a most limited and 
uncertain atonement. In deed is it 
any atonement at all? 

The Primitive Baptists preach 
the power of God quickens the 
dead, and that Jesus having all 
power quickens whom he will, and 
makes sinners willing in the day of 
his power, and that he saves and 
calls them with a holy calling, and 
not according to their works; an:! 
that all that call on the name of the 
Lord shall be saved, and that every 
one that thirsts shall be filled, and 
whosoever will come to Jesus shall 
be saved, and that all that are 
weary and heavy laden are among 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



195 



the redeemed; or that salvation is 
free and without money or price or 
previous goodness of the creature; 
nor is it based on his good works 
foreseen, but causes the sinner to 
perform good works and lead a 
godly life. 

Salvation is a gift in every and 
all senses of the word gift. Preach- 
ing too is a gift, and those that the 
Lord calls to preach receive their 
qualifications and preparations of 
him. 

It is through much tribulation 
that we enter the Kingdom of Hea- 
ven. My trouble is not with the 
people my lot is cast among, nor 
with the doctrine they hold, as 
Ruth said, entreat me not 4o leave 
thee; or to forsake from following 
thee, and the feeling of my choice 
and heart is thy people shail be my 
people, and thy God my God. 

The Primitive Baptists have 
faults and know that they are sin- 
ners. Nor do we occupy the land 
or live as we should. The strength 
is decayed, and burden-bearers are 
weak. The strength and force of 
discipline is much wasted, and we 
have departed from the living God 
in many things. Still they come 
nearer to the ancient landmarks 
than any people w.ithin my know- 
ledge. They know the truth and 
rest in Jesus alone for salvation. 

My trouble is concerning myself. 
My unbelief, and disobedient con- 
duct give me more trouble than any- 
thing and yet it seems to me that it 
does not grieve me deeply enough 
or I would repent and reform 
more. Daily nothing but grace can 
reach my case. A s I look back and 
can see my life how abased I should 
feel. Persecuting the church, reck- 



less in manners, if called to preach 
it is in such a way as to humble me 
for life, having been brought from 
the land of Moab, if a Christian at 
all, having a fleshly experience, and 
was taught the depths of Satan by 
going through its cheats and prac- 
ticing in its pretensions, if there is 
one that can truly say by the grace 
of God I am what I am it is myself. 

Still after so much that should 
humble me, I am yet a sinner, no 
better, but rather worse. 

If others have where-of to glory 
in works I have th^ Lord Jesus to 
glory in who had mercy on me and 
saved me. If others may seem to 
glory in salvation by works it does 
seem that none could blame me for 
loving salvation by grace. For 
nothing else could save me. 

I can never ascertain to a certain- 
ty that I am a child of God. We 
are saved by hope, and walk by 
faith. We are to give diligence to 
make onr calling and election sure. 
This is a life time matter, nor is the 
task finished while we are in this 
mortal state. 

As to the matter of preaching it 
has never been clear to my mind 
that I am called of God to preach, 
as we know things naturally. It ap- 
pears to me if I could know that 
he has called me to serve thus in 
the gospel of his Son that it would, 
next to my own personal salvation, 
be the greatest thing to know; and 
if I could know my services thus 
rendered are of the Lord and to the 
profit of his people, then it would 
be the sweetest and best of all 
labor. 

When I was received among the 
Primitive Baptists I laid my ser- 
vices at their feet, and said on the 



196 



ZJON'S LANDMARK 



day that I was received that if my 
service was not of the Lord my de- 
sire was to cease, and that if I 
could quit I would like to do so. 

But with me it is not a matter of 
choice, nor am I able to keep my 
mouth shut or hold my peace, yet I 
am not able to decide fully without 
any fear that I am a gcspel preach- 
er, and still I am afraid to try to 
stop, nor dare I do so. 

This is a soul humbling life, a 
life of trial. and straits. The ques- 
tion is never with me, what money 
shall I receive, but it is what have 
I to give? It is more blessed to give 
than to receive. Have I anything 
of the Lord to give? Has he given 
roe a message for the people? I am 
poor in this world's goods and ex- 
pect to be as long as I live. Yet 
the Lord supplies my need. He has 
cast my lot as an editor, and by my 
own labor I earn my bread for my- 
self and those that are with me, and 
this is in harmony with my views of 
labor and duty. For a preacher or 
an editor is no better to labor than 
others, and labor is ennobling, and 
if by word or pen or writing I am 
able to serve the Lord that is enough 
for me. It does appear to me that 
money and the love of it is degrad- 
ing, and that the best employment 
of man is to seek nobler things than 
worldly gain. While some suppose 
that gain is godliness, it does not 
occur to me that a soul is ever re- 
deemed with money, or any such 
corruptible thing as silver and gold, 
and therefore money nor the giving 
of money can ever atone for sin, 
nor save a soul, either in this land 
or any other country. 

The maintaining of these princi- 
ples or those that the Primitive 



Baptists hold renders one necessar- 
ily unpopular with the world. If 
ye were of the world it would love 
its own. We must be crucified to 
the world, hatred of men for sake 
of Jesus, and our names cast out as 
evil. 

It was in 1871, contrary to any 
and all my expectations, or thought 
I was requested to move to Wilson 
where my room has been ever since. 
A contract had been made for me 
to live elsewhere and teach school. 
This contract was cancled by mu- 
tual consent. 

Soon after moving to Wilson Eld. 
Bodenheimer who was then Editor 
of this paper, requeste 1 me to be- 
come Associate Editor, and pretty 
soon it (fame into my hand. All of 
this was unforeseen by me, un- 
thought of and unsought, but as the 
w£y was opened I found myself 
willing, if enabled of the Lord, to 
serve in this Way. Though feeling 
incompetent, yet it seems impressed 
on me thus to serve, and if it is prof- 
itable to the household of faith that 
is reward enough for me. This too 
seems to be the way Providence has 
prepared and opened for me to sup- 
port my family and self with food 
and raiment together with the little 
help otherwise received. But it is 
mainly, indeed nearly all, obtained 
in this way. 

It has been the disposition of my 
mind, or according to my feelings 
to serve churches. But seldom do 
I take any trip otherwise than as a 
pastor visiting the same churches 
I've been endeavoring to serve for 
years though it would be a pleasure 
to me to often visit other churches. 

The brethren have borne surpris- 
ingly with me and my infirmities, 
while they are accused as sinners 



ttON'S LANDMARK 



197 



and selfish. I know there is one sin- 
ner among them and that one is 
myself. They are a kind and lov- 
ing people and have shown me 
much kindness. 

For about twelve years my health 
was very poor and it was unusually 
much of an effort to keep going; 
but within the last year or two it is 
better. It was the Lord that heal- 
ed me, for in him we live and move 
and have our being. Having ob- 
tained mercy of the Lord I continue 
to this present time testifying re- 
pentance toward God and faith to- 
ward our Lord Jesus Christ. 

My hope is toward God, if not a 
deceived soul. Many are my heart 
sinkings and heart searching at 
times. Heavy burdens of a sense of 
vilenes^ and friendlessness pass 
over me, yet the Lord delivers and 
I trust and hope he will yet deliver. 
There is hope that when our brief 
stay on earth has passed then we 
shall be partakers of the glorious 
fruits of the resurrection. 

To this end I labor sincerely de- 
siring to be found in Christ. To have 
a conscience void of offense toward 
God and man is the best of all liv- 
ing. There is no such living amid 
all the wealth and honors of earth. 
To be so exercised in the truth that 
one may be able to keep his body 
under and live to the Lord in peace 
and in good will toward men is the 
best of all living. 

If God be for us who can be 
against us? If by the faith of Jesus 
I am enabled to live in truth dwell- 
ing with Israel in peace, and hav- 
ing good will toward men this is a 
good exercise. 

May peace be upon Israel and 
the blessing of the Lord rest on and 



direct my labor and may it be to the 
Lord. 

Brethren, pray for me that my 
faith fail not. To be dead to the 
world and all worldly institutions, 
and alive unto God through Jesus 
Christ our Lord and to live the life 
I now live in the flesh by the faith 
of the Son of God, who loved me 
and gave himself for me, and be 
found unto praise and honor and 
glory at his appearing is my desire. 

P. D. GOLD. 



AN ANCHOR OF THE SOUL 

Dear Brother Lester: 

After reading Sister Williams' 
letter and your remarks following 
it prompted me to write some things 
I have experienced and kept to my- 
self more than forty years. Twen- 
ty years after I had a hope for a 
hope which proved to be as I now 
believe, an anchor of the soul, both 
sure and steadfast, in my case, as it 
caused me more trouble than if I 
had had no hope, trying to solve 
the mystery as to how a child of 
God could be such and still be a 
sinner, and believe that he is saved 
from his sins, but the more light or 
revelation is given us the more we 
realize the mystery of godliness, 
for this cause, realizing my ignor- 
ance and illiteracy are so humiliat- 
ing that I have not felt to write 
about the things that gave me the 
relief that I was seeking. From 
time to time I could see more and 
more the beauty and sweetness in 
the new birth. Regeneration 
brought about in some way, as in 
the case of the virgin mother of our 
Saviour, an overshadowing of the 
holy spirit in connection with our 
spiritual genesis and a new crea- 
ture is formed independent of the 



198 



2I0NS LANDMARK 



Adamie man which is not changed 
but the elder shall serve the young- 
er. There the wonders begin 
and the world, the flesh and 
the devil keep up this warfare 
as long as we are in the flesh. I 
cou'd see, after these precious 
truths were shown me that we are 
saved from our sins. "He that is 
born of God cannot sin for his seed 
remaineth in him," they are new 
creatures. 

These are my views of the new 
birth and the gospel we learn 
from Paul, also from our experience 
brings to light this life and immor- 
tality. I have been hearing preach- 
ing from early childhood in a way, 
but never understood it until after 
I had experienced the above. As 
"the carnal mind receiveth not the 
things of the spirit, neither can he 
know them because they are spirit- 
ually discerned.'' Do we conclude 
that the preaching of the gospel is 
not instrumental in convicting and 
convicting dead sinners, but all of 
the honor and glory is of the Lord. 
He says I will not give my glory to 
another. I have been moved in 
some way to believe that all the 
preachers that preach and teach 
this doctrine are willing to abide in 
their calling and do not strive for 
the mastery or leadership and we 
never hear of them having division 
or church trouble, nor do they en- 
vy their brethren who may be con- 
sidered more able than they are. 

A very dear and precious teacher 
who is a good and able minister of 
the Testament, said to me some 
time ago, that if I was a preacher 
my doctrine would be questioned or 
criticised,. I told him that perhaps 
it was anyway but that I had never 



expressed my belief to be free but 
I thought I was in line with those 
who were considered sound in the 
doctrine that the Baptists have 
been preaching as well as I could 
remember. I would like to know of 
you how you would answer a ques- 
tion that was asked me by a believ- 
er but not a member, as to the Re in 
Regeneration and Renewing of the 
Holy Ghost. At the time, I have no 
light and gave him no answer, but 
since then in comparing the scrip- 
tures with my views, it seems the 
church, the bride, the lamb's wife 
was his before time and having lost 
her identity in the fall of her 
federal head. He having to redeem 
her from under the curse of the law, 
it Was necessary for him in redemp- 
tion to regenerate by renewing of 
the Holy Ghost, washing her in His 
precious blood that she might be 
purified by the washing of regener- 
ation and renewing of the Holy 
Ghost, which prompted Paul to say 
to Titus, not by works of righteous- 
ness which we have done but ac- 
cording to his mercy he saved us 
by the washing of regeneration and 
the renewing of the Holy Ghost. I 
would be glad to have your views 
on this subject. I do not think I 
ever heard any one advance an idea 
on this subject. 

You are aware of the fact that I 
have passed my four score years 
and will not expect much of me 
having known me more than half 
of my life. You will make allow- 
ances for such as you cannot en- 
dorse. If the Ajdamic man is born 
again into eternal life there would 
be no death, but as I see it, he will 
die because of sin and if the preach 
ing of the gospel creats spiritual 
life why not that all who hear the 



2I0N S LANDMARK 



199 



gospel preached — as by the natural 
ear believe and be converted, and 
the bride must be cleansed and pur- 
ified so as to appear as John saw 
her when on the Isle of Patmos. 
Pray for me and mine. 
Your little weak brother, 
E. R. HARRIS. 
Reidsville, N. C. 

THE LORD IS KEEPING HER 

Elder C. F. Denny, 
Wlilson, N. C. 
Dear Brother : 

Find enclosed check for $2.00 for 
the Landmark for Mrs. Lucretia 
Evans, Greenville, N. C, Route 3. 
She is the sister that was so unfor- 
tunate as to have to go to the coun- 
ty home but I feel like I can say I 
believe the blessed Lord is guiding 
and keeping her. She is still bright 
in mind and well up on the scrip- 
tures to be seventy-eight years old. 
Her memory is good and she talks 
beautifully of the dealings of the 
Lord with her. 

I hope she will not miss a copy of 
the Landmark as that is all the 
preaching she gets to hear, only as 
Brother Joyner goes sometimes and 
preaches for her and she seems to 
be overjoyed when she can hear 
preaching. It revives her and 
makes her feel she is not forsaken. 

Brother Denny, I hope you will 
all be spared to keep the Landmark 
going for I do not want to miss a 
single one if I can help it. I read 
and reread and get the old ones and 
read old Brother Gold's writings 
which I so much enjoy. May the 
Lord ' add his blessing. 

Your little sister, I hope, 

MIITTIE STOKES BRIGHHT. 

Chicod, N. C. 



CONDOLENCE 

Dear Lida, 

The news your letter brings is 
sad indeed for I loved your dear 
father as a dear brother in Christ, 
and for the many good traits in his 
make-up, and I sorrow that I shall 
pee his face no more in this life. I 
mourn for your dear mother, too. 
She also has been a very dear one 
to me for many years, and as I write 
I remember that forty-four years 
ago today she was one of the brides 
maids at my marriage to Ella B. 
Harrison. (Blessed memory). She 
has been gone near eleven years, so 
1 know just how your mother feels, 
and I am trying to ask the dear 
Lord, whom your father and moth- 
er have loved for many years to be 
with her as her day and trial re- 
quires. 

I have been in the home of your 
dear parents enough to know that 
the love they had for each other 
was genuine. They were always 
true and faithful to each other. 
Each kindly considering the other, 
and it was always a real pleasure 
to me to spend time with them, and 
those occasions are sweet to my 
memory. I also think of the plea- 
sure it gave me you and Eddie, as 
children to welcome me to your 
home. 

Tell your mother that I know 
from sad experience what it means, 
and no one but the dear Lord can 
give her relief. It is good to know 
we have friends who Would do us 
good if they could, but the Lord 
alone is our help.. May he comfort 
her heart as no other can. She has 
a sweet hope of meeting him in that 
upper and better life. 

As ever your friend, 

JOSHUA T ROWE. 



200 



2I0N»S LANDMARK 



SACRED MUSINGS 

Ah yes, I am sinful and mortal, 
grey hairs, the wrinkles and blem- 
ishes all declare the decay of this 
corruptible tabernacle. I love my 
body, this house of clay; this is very 
evident, for I nourish and cherish 
it., Ephes. 5-29, but it waxeth old, 
I feel its frailty, its aches and 
pains, its days of languor and sick- 
ness all admonish me that some day 
the 'earthly house of this taber- 
nacle will be dissolved. 

O thou precious Jesus, the Heav- 
enly One, 1 Cor 15-49 my thoughts 
are turned to thee. Once thou 
was here in the world in the like- 
ness of sinful flesh, thou wast slain, 
laid in the tomb, but thou hast tri- 
umphed over death and the grave, 
thou has risen from the dead, tri- 
umphed over sin and death and the 
grave, thou hast ascended on high, 
thou now art glorified, crowned 
with glory and honor. Heb. 2-9. 

Hast thou not bought thy people 
with a price? This hope thou hast 
wrought in me, that my body and 
spirit are thine. 1 Cor. 6-20. O Sa- 
vior, thou art precious, my soul 
clingeth to thee, and from thy lov- 
ed doctrine this I know, our "bod- 
ies are the members of Christ." 1 
Cor. 6-15. How instructive, how 
comforting is that word : "The body 
is for the Lord, and the Lord for the 
body." O Jesus, lovely one, mighty 
Redeemer, thou knowest the bodies 
of thy chosen ones are weak, mor- 
tal, corruptible, vile, but thy doc- 
trine speaketh to my heart, they 
shall sleep in Jesus, (be laid to 
sleep by Jesus..) Blessed sleep! 
O, in that moment let me gaze up- 
on thy charms, 
And clasp thee dying, in my faint- 
ing arms; 



Then gently, leaning on thy breast; 

Sink in soft slumber into sacred 
rest. 

Death's gastly form shall have a 

pleasing air, 
And all things smile, while heaven 

and thou art there; 
My soul with thee in paradise shall 

be, 

My body laid to sleep by thee. 
Laid to sleep by thee? 

O sweet, consoling thought, my 
flesh shall rest in hope. "Laid to 
sleep by Jesus." Thine own voice 
shall us awake, yes, we shall awake 
with thy°likeness, Psalm 17-15, im- 
mortal, incorruptible* glorified, 
fashioned like unto the glorious 
body of our ascended Redeemer. 
Phil. 3-21. We shall bear the im- 
age of the heavenly. On earth I 
see all comeliness decay, here pain 
and sickness, woes and death are 
ours. 

O sin does so mar and taint our 
mortal life, here we have blight, 
and shadow, bitterness and strife, 
but there, in heaven above, where 
reigns our dear Redeemer the 
known. There, there is no waning 
of our day, there shall be no night 
there, the Lamb is the light thereof. 
Rev. 21-23-25. 

O then, when in my dying hour 
All nature sinks and fades away, 
Support my soul with thy redeem- 
ing power; 

Thy smile shall be my everlasting 
day. 

FREDERICK W. KEENE. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



SIGN'S LANDMARK 



201 



ION'S LANDMARK 

"Remove not the -ancient landmrak 
which thy fathers have set." 



Elder P. G. Lester — Roanoke, Va. 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla 

Eider C. F. Denny— Wilson, N. C. 
VOL. LVIII No. 13 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, May 15, 1925 



THE CREATURE 

Elder Geo. W. Hundley, Calle- 
mas, Va., requests me to write my 
thoughts on Romans 8-20, For the 
creature was made subject to van- 
ity, not willingly, but by reason of 
him who hath subjected the same 
in hope. 

In order to get a proper under- 
standing of w*hat the apostle means 
by the creature we should first de- 
termine which creature it is to 
which he has reference. Evident- 
ly to my mind the entire subject 
matter of this chapter has reference 
to the subject of salvation in which 
his nature, character and condition 
are set forth. If any man be in 
Christ he, the man who is in Christ, 
is a new creature. The operation by 
which he comes into Christ consti- 
tutes a creation — created in Christ 
Jesus — and the result is a new crea- 
ture — created, made, and formed 
of the dust of the ground of a new 



earth under the canopy of a new 
heaven and a new earth wherein 
dwelleth righteousness. While the 
sinner' man is the subject matter of 
the new creation, the creation itself 
is in Christ Jesus, who is himself 
the sum and substance of the new 
creation, and is the first born of ev- 
ery creature. Christ in you the hope 
of glory. In a blessed experience 
Christ becomes formed in the sub- 
ject of gospel address the hope of 
glory — not a hope, but the hope. 
While Christ is the hope it is the 
sinner's hope, the creature's hope. 
And while the sinner saved by 
grace realizes that in his flesh, his 
carnal nature, his sinful self there 
dwells no good thing, and while he 
is subject to the wretched effects 
of the leprosy, which remains in the 
walls of the earthly house in which 
he tabernacles in this life, yet he 
does not yield to despair, for Christ 
is in him that blessed hope by which 
he is saved — that all sufficient hope 
which is both sure and steadfast, 
and as is his hope so is he. He feels 
to be possessed of a blessed assur- 
ance that Christ is his all and in 
all, and therefore he can not fail, 
but must prevail, he must be saved. 
The most of this confidence, of this 
present salvation, is the grace of 
God through faith, "by grace are 
ye saved." He had felt a disposi- 
tion in him and like a thorn in his 
flesh Which seemed to taunt him 
with the vain and flattering things 
of earth, and he besought the Lord 
that it might be removed, but the 
Lord replied, "M|y grace is suffi- 
cient for thee. In weakness is my 
strength made perfect; so that he 
could say, when I am weak then 
am I strong. Evidently it was ac- 



202 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



cording to the will of the Creator 
that the creature should be of just 
such composition and character as 
it is said to be, subject to vanity, 
susceptible to the affection of vain, 
delusive and foolish things, giving 
heed to seducing spirits and the 
doctrine of devils running after 
witches, yielding to their crafts, 
and standing opposed to the things 
that make for peace and rioting in 
hate and hateful things until you 
are made to wonder if it is possible 
that such things may be really at- 
tributable to one who has tasted 
that the Lord is gracious. And 
you must say, yes, it must be so, for 
while I, at times can but hope in 
God, at other times I have had to 
fight these things and to'beat my 
body, to bruise it, and mortify it, 
to keep it under lest having preach- 
ed to others, I myself should be a 
castaway; and I feel but for the 
sufficiency of grace I must have ut- 
terly failed, but for the grace of 
God, which is ever with me, keep- 
ing me through faith unto the ul- 
timate of salvation, which is an ev- 
er present salvation in the gracious 
preservation which is in Christ Je- 
sus, I should not, in the midst of 
these sore trials, be able to stand' 
and rejoice in hope of the glory of 
God. 

This creature is crucified unto 
the world and the world is crucified 
unto him. Therefore he is dead to 
the law by the body of Christ, and 
is alive unto God through faith 
which is in Christ.. The faith by 
which he lives is the faith of Christ 
and is in him, and tho Paul is in 
the flesh and lives a life in the flesh, 
it is by. the faith which is in Christ 
the Son of God, who loved him and 
gave Himself for him. 



These creatures are two fold In 
their make up. As such they are 
made so to be. As sons of man they 
are capable of knowing the imper- 
fection and frailty that is in man 
and what it is to be a sinner, and 
to need salvation and from what 
sinners are saved; and as sons of 
God they are given to know the 
perfection and stability of God, and 
His power to bring into subjection 
to the obedience of Christ every 
vain and foolish thought which like 
the fools eye is so> often seen feast- 
ing upon enticing vanities at the 
ends of the earth. But the com- 
mand reaches them even there say- 
ing, look unto me, all ye ends of the 
earth and be ye .saved for I am God 
and there is none else. 

This creature is the subject of 
gospel address — the one to whom 
the Lord commands that the gospel 
should be preached, and Paul says 
this gospel which was preached to 
every creature under heaven — 
These are the living creatures of 
God who know the joyful sound 
and believe it and rejoice in it, 
however there are some that do not 
believe which is in evidence of the 
fact that in fact they are subject 
to the vain things of earth, and for 
the time being can not enter in and 
lay hold of the promises and I em- 
brace them, and to give personal 
application to their own hearts, but 
are rather disposed to confer them 
upon the children of God; while at 
other times they feel to say, surely 
these precious things are for needy 
sinners such as they feel themselves 
to be. 

Paul feels now to be the chief of 
sinners and again he is less than 
the least of all saints. He finds a 
thorn in the flesh, a messenger of 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



•203 



Satan to buffet him and humble 
him — lest ; /he become exalted 
through the abundance of revela- 
tion that was given unto him. Some 
of our people are afraid to say to 
even their pastor, "you preached 
a good sermon, I enjoyed it," for 
fear he will become puffed up, or 
get the big head, and kill himself, 
I admit that what is called the big 
head is a dangerous disease, but 
there is no need of apprehending 
that one of God's called and sent 
ministers could possibly be thus af- 
flicted, for he knows how to make 
preachers and to temper them by 
putting a charm in their flesh that 
makes a sore that runs all through 
the night, that makes them some- 
times, to become as they feel to be, 
a stench- in their own nostrils, and 
to abhor the very clothes they have 
to wear. I sometimes feel that I 
must have fallen out by the way ex- 
cept the Lord had kept me by his 
power through faith which is in 
His (Son, who endured the cross 
despising the shame. What 
shame? My shame, therefore I am 
not ashamed of the gospel of Christ. 
"Ashamed of Jesus, that dear 
friend upon whom my hopes of 
heaven depend." No; when I blush 
— be this my shame, That I no more 
revere His name." 

These creatures are sinners, 
saved by grace. In their flesh there 
dwells no good thing while in Christ 
Jesus they are perfect wanting, or 
lacking, no good thing. 

These creatures are nothing by 
grace that they are in the flesh, nor 
are they anything in the flesh what 
they are by grace in the spirit. 

Jacob as a man was a sinner, a 
supplanter, but as the servant of 



God, his name was called Israel. As 
Israel he was the creature of God 
one who served him, but as Jacob 
he was the creature man the sinner, 
the subject of salvation. As God 
loved Jacob he was the subject of 
salvation, the sinner, and as he 
blessed him and called him by a 
new name he was the sinner saved 
— Israel — the friend of God. Thus 
we find in Jacob all the character- 
istics of this creature. The Lord 
commanded the enemies of Jacob 
to be round about him forever and 
yet he fought his battles for him 
and kept him as the apple of his 
eye. Every day of our lives we are 
given to prove within our own 
hearts that the Lord is the saviour 
of sinners and that we are saved by 
His grace. 

This creature is not what he used 
to be nor is he what he expects to 
be. He is not satisfied with what he 
is, he does not want to be what he 
used to be, and has no confidence in 
those who claim to be what he 
craves to be. He is a riddle to him- 
self and to every one else except 
those who are just like him. 

Since I began to pen these 
thoughts I see that our dear broth- 
er, Elder Hundley has passed away, 
and has no doubt entered into ever- 
lasting fullness, and does not need 
what I have said. He was about 
totally deaf and got his comfort 
from reading but now he must be 
satisfied with seeing Jesus as he is 
and being like him. He knew the 
joyful sound by faith speaking to 
his heart in a voice small and still. 

May peace rest in our memory of 
him. 4 
P. G. LESTER, l 



'204 



2ION'S LANDMARK 



DEMSEY W. CALHOUN 

It is through much weakness and with 
Bad hearts that we wi.l attempt to write 
of the death of our dear father; Dempsey 
W. Calhoun. 

He was born August 4, 1848, and died 
December 22, 1924, making his stay on 
earth 7 6 years four months and eighteen 
days. Funeral services were conducted 
by his pastor, Elder A. B. Denson and in- 
terment made in the old home burial 
grounds. 

■ In April 1874 he was married to Jen- 
ettie Francis Brake. They lived peace- 
ably together until her death in Febru- 
ary 1897. 

In 1890 they both united with the Prim- 
itive Baptist church at Falls of Tar Riv- 
er, Rocky Mount, N. C..,. and were bap- 
tized by the pastor, Elder P. D. Gold. 

To this union were born nine children, 
five girls and four boys, who were alll 
raised to be grown. 

In November 1902, he was married to 
Ella Womble of Nash county, unto this 
union were born two boys. 

He was always prompt in attending reg- 
ular meetings at his church and also oth- 
ers when not providentially hindered. . 

In February 1917, he was ordained as 
deacon of his church which office he faith- 
fully filled until his death. 

After June 1924 he was confined to his 
bed most of the time being able to attend 
church only a few times. •* 

He bore his sufferings patiently never 
complaining or even becoming tired of his 
bed. He often said he was only waiting 
for the good Master to take him from this 
vile, sinful world. 

He always greeted his company with a 
smile and seemed to enjoy having them 
so much; especial y the members of the 
church. He would say he didn't feel wor- 
thy of such good company and didn't 
know they thought so much of him. 

All was done for him that doctors, 
nurses and loving hands could do but none 
could stay the icy hand of death. 

He was always a kind husband and lov- 
ing father, speaking kind words at all 
times and always ready to help the sick 
and needy. 

He leaves to mourn their loss a lov- 
ing wife, nine children and twenty-eight 
grand children, together with a host of rel- 
atives and friends, two children having 
preceded him to the grave. 

However we mourn but not as- tnose 
without hope, for we have a sweet hope 
that he is still alive in Christ. 

Sleep on dear father and take thy rest. 
We a'l miss and love you but God loves 
you best. 

Written by his unworthy son and dau- 
ghter. 

DORA WORSLEY and 
M. D. CALHOUN. 



MRS. LOUISA A. WYNN 

Death has again entered Singleton 
church and taken from our midst our 
dearly be oved sister, Mrs. Xouisa A. 
Wynn. She was so loving and faithful 
ever manifesting her great love for the 
household of faith.. We shall miss her, 
but we bow in humble submission to Him 
who doeth all things well. 

She was born in the year 1855 and was 
the daughter of John and Annie Jenkins. 

She was married to Mr. Thomas A. 
Wynn and to them were born nine chil- 
dren, 6 boys and 3 girls. Five of them 
preceded her to the grave. On July 10th, 
1892 she came before the church at Sin- 
gleton, gave a reason of her hope in Christ 
was received and was baptised the next 
day by Elder L. E. Everett. She always 
filled her seat at church when able. We 
feel that she was rich in faith and in her 
the grace of God did abundantly abound. 

Se was taken sick January 10 with 
weak kidneys, weak heart and side pleu- 
risy, but got some better until February 
3rd she had a paralytic stroke of the right 
side and remained unconscious until she 
passed away on February 10th from this 
wor d to regain consciousness where all 
is joy and peace and love to be forever 
blest. She leaves a husband and four 
children, who did for her all that loved 
ones can do with many brethren, sisters 
and friends to mourn their loss which we 
hope is her eternal gain and we hope to 
meet her on Zions' blissful shore. 

A few years ago she, with her family, 
moved to Norfolk, Va., where he could not 
attend her meetings regularly but she at- 
tended meetings in Norfolk and would 
write to us at home when she could not 
come. She was with us in our meeting 
last November and seemed to rejoice in 
it so much. She was brought to Singleton 
church where Elder E. C. Stone preached 
her funeral after which she was laid to 
rest to await the resurrection morn. 

May the Lord comfort the sorrowing 
hearts. 

Done by act of conference Mar. 7, 1925 
ELDER J. N. ROGERSON, Mod. 
MRS. SARAH T. ALLIGOOD, Clerk. 



HAD TO ENTER HOSPITAL 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

Elder W. W. Styron asked me to an- 
nounce through the Landmark that he 
left home to fill his appointment with the 
churches but when he got to Mewborn's' he 
had to enter the hospital to have an op- 
eration for appendicitis.. For this cause 
he will not be able to meet his ap- point- 
ments. 

Brother Styron is profitab'e for the 
ministry and we hope he will soon be out 
and preaching to the people of God who 
love the truth. 

As ever your true friend. 

^ L. H. HARDY. 



ZfON'S LANDMARK 



203 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, God, in His infinite wisdom, 
has seen fit to remove by death, our es- 
teemed and much beloved brother and 
deacon, P. NT. Walker, who passed away 
March 18, 1925.. Brother Walker loved 
his church and the doctrine of salvation 
by grace. Had no confidence in the flesh. 
He walked out his religion, a man of few 
words. His answer was yea and nay. Was 
a deacon thirty years. 

Resolved, First, that we bow to God 
who rules all things after the council of 
His own will, that it was the purpose of 
God to take him to a better land than 
this, where no farewells will be said, no 
shedding of tears, no separations, all will 
be peace and happiness. 

Resolved Second, That the church at 
Pleasant Grove has lost one of its most 
useful members, and that we will miss his 
council and words of comfort and that 
we extend to his wife and children our 
sympathy. 

Resolved, Third that a copy of this no- 
tice be sent his dear wife, a copy be 
spread on our church book and a copy 
be sent to the Landmark. 

Done by order of the church while in 
conference. 

B\ B. Mc KINNEY, Mod. 
T. A. STANFIELD, Clerk. 



ISAAC CORNELIUS CLAYTON 

It is with a sad and broken heart I make 
the attempt to write the death of ray d^ar 
sweet baby boy. Corne ius was born May 
16, 1 920 and died September 29, 1924, 
with blood poison from his teeth which 
caused his death. Funeral service was 
held in Eno Primitive Baptist church in 
Durham county by Elder Chas.. Woods, 
pastor of the church, after which the little 
body was laid to rest in the church cem- 
etery. I did not know what trouble was 
until the Lord took my dear baby from 
me. Only those who have experienced 
parting with a loved one at his age 
can know how sad it is. He loved to go 
around with his papa so much. Pen nor 
tongue cannot te'l how heart-rending it is. 
But I know the Lord knows best. . I am 
satisfied he is at rest. Sometimes I feel 
if it had been the Lord's will to take him 
in infancy we would not have missed him 
so much. The last few months he lived 
he was ro smart and tender hearted I 
felt likp he would grow up to be a good 
bey. He leaves father, mother and three 
sisters to mourn his loss. We miss him 
everywhere. The choice of the family is 
gone, his sweet voice we loved is still. 
His vacant seat can never be filled. My 
greatest desire is to meet him in heaven 
above where all is love. 

Written by his heart-broken mother. 

MRS. C, C. CLAYTON, 



MRS. EMMA CARROLL 

I have had a very great desire to write 
a short, sketch of my dear mother's 
death, Mrs. Emma Carroll, the daughter 
of Henry and Elizabeth Greene. She was 
born April 4, 1855, and died on March 
21, 1925. She was a good and faithful 
mother. She had lots of trouble during 
her life. Her husband was taken from 
her in 1902, leaving her with one small 
son about ten years of age. They lived 
alone for about eight years, then she 
broke up house-keeping, and made her 
home with me, but stayed with her old- 
est daughter about half of, the time. Dur- 
ing the influenza she lost two sons and 
one daughter in the month of October, 
1918. Only the Lord could give her 
strength to bear her troubies, then I was 
taken the day the last son died, with the 
same disease, so she left home and stayed 
with me until I was able to be up. She 
bore her troubles with much patience. 

I do miss her so much, I just cannot 
realize she is dead a part of the time. It 
seems like she wi 1 come back home soon, 
as she called our house home. She had 
been with me just three weeks the day 
she was buried. I was so glad she spent 
her last days with me, where I could be 
with her. I do hope some day to meet 
her where there is no more parting. I 
feel like she is sweetly resting. She 
called her mother and husband while she 
was sick. believe she is with them, she 
was the most patient and pleasant sick 
person that I ever saw in my life, she did 
not want to worry anyone to wait on her. 

She was a member of the Primitive 
Baptist church lor about thirtythree years. 
Funeral services were held at the grave by 
her pastor, Elder Jesse B-arnes. She 
leaves to mourn her loss, two sons and 
two daughters, Mrs. C. E. Perry, Mrs. J. I. 
Whitley and Worth Carroll and Earl Car- 
roil. 

Written by her devoted daughter, 

MRS. J. J. WHITLEY. 



DEACON P. M. WALKER 

The subject of this notice was born 
December 17, 1854 and died March 18, 
19 25, making his stay on earth 70 years 
three months and one day. He was hap- 
pily married to Miss Hulda B. McKin- 
ney October 13, 1874. Eighteen children 
were born to this union. Eleven children 
his wife, 60 grand children and nine 
great grand children survive, together 
with many relatives and friends to mourn 
their loss. 

Brother Walked joined the church at 
Pleasant Grove Saturday before 3rd Sun- 
day in May, 1888 and was baptised the. 
next day by Elder J. A. Burch. Soon 
after he united with the church, he was 
ordained a deacon. For thirty years he 
filled this place. 

Brother Walker was a lovely brother. 
He was sound in the faith and doctrine, 
and ever adorned the profession he made 



206 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



•with an orderly walk and godly conver- 
sation. He was born in Rockingham 
County and died at the place where he 
was born, near the church he so much 
loved. He was a good provider, was a 
fine tobacco grower and laid aside his 
saving-s till he accumulated a nice amount 
to leave behind. 

He believed in p'.ainness, industry and 
frugality. His answer was yea and nay. 

When Brother Walker saw his lost and 
ruined condition, it was so severe that he 
could not work for three months. He 
verily thought that he would go to tor- 
ment. But the Lord was leading him in 
paths unknown to him. I have heard 
him tell his experience many times and 
thought, if I could tell one so bright as 
his, surely I would not doubt as I do. 
When he was delivered, he said he heard 
the sweetest singing he had ever heard 
in his life, just above his head, and he 
knw the song and it was "Dark and 
Thorny is the Desert," etc. He viewed 
the church at Pleasant Grove, the church 
sitting in conference with Elder J. A. 
Burch as moderator. Such wonderful ev- 
idence. He had wonderful views on the 
scriptures and loved to talk on the same, 
and of the dealings of the Lord with him, 
ever ready to give a reason of his hope. 
I shall miss him much. He seemed to 
love me so much, and gave me many as- 
surances that I was called of God to stand 
before the people to preach the everlast- 
ing gospel of God. He was paralyzed for 
about two weeks. He told his people that 
he saw a peace for them all, and told his 
dear companion not to grieve after him. 
He could not speak plain, after being par- 
alyzed, but whistled two verses of "From 
Every Stormy Wind That Blows." He 
must have felt some of the sweetness of 
the mercy seat (Christ). 

He was laid to rest in the cemetery at 
Pleasant Grove, there to remain till the 
Lord shall bid the sleeping dust arise. A 
large congregation attended the funeral, 
which was conducted by Elder J. W. Gil- 
liam and the writer. The floral offerings 
were beautiful. 

Will say to the children, emulate the 
example your dear father set before you. 
One son (G. W. ) is a member with us, and 
is a deacon. Very much like his father. 

Now may the grace of God be with you 
all, is my prayer for Christ's sake. 

T. A. STANFIELD. 

Mclver, N. C. 

(Lone Pilgrim, please copy.) 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas on January 30th, 1925 God in 
His infinite wisdom has seen fit to call 
from the shores of time one of the loved 
members of Mingo church, Sister Polly 
Barefoot. She was born November 2 2nd, 
1865. May 10 1883 she was married to 
Minson Barefoot. . She was baptised sec- 
ond Sunday in October 1911, by Elder W 



M. Monsees. Always filling her seat if 
not providentially hindered. 

Resolved First; That we deeply sympa- 
thize with the bereaved ones, ber hus- 
band has lost a good wife, the church a 
devout member. We point them to the 
Lamb of God who taketh away the sins 
of the world. . 

Resolved Further; That a copy of these 
Resolutions be spread on our minutes and 
a copy be sent to the Landmark for publi- 
cation and a copy sent to the bereaved 
husband. 

XURE LEE, Mod. 
DAVID GODWIN, C. C. 



ELD. W. N. THARP 

Born in Tipton County, Ind., Dec. 9th, 
1849 united with Primitive Baptist church 
in early youth and began preaching be- 
fore he was of age. 

In October the 5th, 1872 he was mar- 
ried to Mary Ann Newhouse, of near 
Morriston, Ind.. Had one son, who died 
at birth and one son now living, Charles 
W. Tharp, who with his wife Rose, is now 
living in Jacksonville, Fla. 

He was the son of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth Tharp, pioneers of Tipton County, 
Ind. He leaves one brother, David, now 
living in Missouri, and one, Harris, in 
Oregon. He was for many years a mem- 
ber of Shiloh Church, near Mor/istown, 
Ind.,. where he was ordained to tae min- 
istry in 1878, but about 1892 mcved his 
membership to Bethlehem chur< h near 
College Corner, O., moving with 1 is fam- 
ily from Greenfield, Ind., to Liberty.. Later 
he moved his membership from Bethle- 
hem church to Fairfield church. Janu- 
ary the 1st, 1919 he united with Sugar 
Grove church at Goodwin Corner, Ind., 
where he retained his memberslrp until 
his death.. He taught school in early 
life, but on account of ill health he began 
working as a contracting carpenter, which 
he followed for many years. In the last 
few years he had been in the greenhouse 
business in Liberty, building up a large 
business from a small beginning within a 
short time. This he followed until age 
and ill health compelled him to retire. He 
traveled extensively through many states, 
proclaiming the. unsearchable riches of 
God. He was truly a spiritual-minded man, 
deeply interested in his~efe*wch, hnd dis- 
claiming any merit or trust in works of 
righteousness which he had done relying 
wholly and entirely in the free grace and 
mercy of God. He was a lover of chil- 
dren and found his greatest joy in their 
companionship. No sacrifice was too great 
for their pleasure. On the 18th day of 
July, of this year he was taken with his 
last sickness and on the 25th started with 
his son Charles for Jacksonville, Fla., 
where he was cared for in his son's home 
until August the 28th, he was removed 
to St. Luke's Hospital where he stayed 
until his death which occurred at 9:45 p. 
m., September the 4th, he died in peace. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

CHURCH NOTICES 



207 



CHANGE OF MEETING 
Mr. John D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Sir: 

You will please publish in four issues 
of your good paper, Zion's Landmark, 
that we the Baptist church of Christ as 
we truly hope of the Primitive faith and 
order here at Lexington, N. C, being as- 
sembled in conference on Saturday night 
before the 4th Sunday in March, 1925 do 
hereby agree that we change our meet- 
ing time from the 4th Saturday at 7 
o'clock and Sunday at 11 A. M'., in each 
month to the 3rd Saturday night at 7 
o'clock and Sunday 11 a. m.., in each 
month. 

We invite all true and orderly Baptists 
and especially ministers to visit us at any 
time and please pray for us when at a 
throne of His rich grace. 

This done and signed by order of the 
church in conference on Saturday night 
before the 4th Sunday in March, 1925. 

ELDER S. H. REED, Mod. 

Mount Olive, N. C. 

C. E. GILLMORE, C. C. 

R. F. D. No. 6 Box 11. 

Lexington, N. C. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

This is to certify that on the 25th day 
of April, 1925, I became wil ing to with- 
draw from fouling Elder C. H. Hagan 
in his rejecting the church at Turner's 
Swamp until he and the church becomes 
reconciled and settles their troubles, and 
I will not in the meantime, preach or of- 
ficiate with him in any of the gospel or- 
dinances. For the benefit of the church 
at Turner's Swamp and myself, I desire 
that this be published in Zion's Land- 
mark. I am in fellowship with them and 
; they have my prayers and sympathy. 



CHURCH NOTICE 

The Primitive Baptist church at Hunt- 
ing Quarters, the Lord will, will hold her 
three days yearly meeting on Friday, Sat- 
urday, and 2nd Sunday in June. 

Our ministering brethren and sisters 
who are in fellowship with us are invited 
to come and worship with us, and to be- 
hold our order. 

We are also glad to see our friends 
with us. 

L. H. HARDY, Pastor. 
JOHN D. SMJ.TH, C. C. 



STAUNTON RIVER UNION 

The Staunton River Union meeting will 
be held with the Richmond church, Rich- 
mond, Va., Friday, Saturday and fifth 
Sunday in May. . All lovers of the truth 
are invited. 

The church is located at 28th street 
and Simms Ave., South Richmond. Take 
Forest Hill car south. 

G. S. WEIDER, Church Clerk. 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE UNION 

The next session of the Upper Country 
Line Union will be held, the Lord willing, 
with the church at Lynche's Creek, Cas- 
well Co., N. C, on the 5th Sunday and 
Saturday before in May, 1925.. Brethren 
sisters a"nd friends are cordially invited 
to come and be with us, especially min- 
isters. 

This church building is located one half 
mile from Corbett, N. C. 

W. C. KING, Union Clerk. 



EASTERN UNION 

The next sitting of the Eastern Union 
is to be with the church at White Plains 
where we hope to meet a big "number of 
the brethren and sisters and especially 
ministers. 



ELD. GEORGE ROBBINS. 



A. W. AMBROSE, Clerk, 



208 



ZION'3 LANDMARK 



i CONTfiNTNEA UNION 

The next session of the Contentnea Un- 
ion will be held with the church at Plea- 
sant Hill 5th Saturday and Sunday in 
May. 

Visitors by railroad should write me 
what train they will arrive on, Friday P. 
M., or Saturday A. M., and they will be 
met. ^jflil 
H. L. BRAKE. 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 



SKEWARKY UNION 

The next session of the Skewarky Un- 
ion will convene with the church at Rob- 
ersonville, Martin County, N. C, fifth Sun- 
day in May 1925 also Friday and Saturday 
before. Elder N. H. Harrison was ap- 
pointed to preach the introductory and 
Elder J. C. Moore his alternate. We in- 
vite all lovers of gospel truth to be with 
us.. 

R. A. BAILEY, Union Clerk. 



BLACK CREEK UNION 

Please publish in the next Landmark 
the Black Creek Union is to be held at 
Creeeh's church Saturday and 5th Sun- 
day in May. Visitors to be met at Micro 
on Friday afternoon. A general invi- 
tation is extended. 

J. T. COLLIER. 



UNVILfcE UNIPN 

You will please publish in the Zion's 
Landmark that the next session of the Lin- 
ville Union will be held with the church 
here at Lexington, N. C, the 5th Saturday 
and Sunday in May, 1925, and we ex- 
tend a general invitation to all true and 
orderly Baptists and especially ministers 
to come and be with us. All trains will 
be met on Saturday morning on the South- 
ern railway and Friday evening on the 
Winston-Salem south bound railway. 

BRO. H. S. WILLIAMS, Mod. 

Spencer, N. C. 

C. E. GILLMORE, Church Clerk. 
R. F. D. 6 Box 11. 
Lexington, N. C. 



SMITHFIELD UNION 

The next session of the Smithfleld Un- 
ion will meet with Bethany church, John- 
ston county, N. C, on Saturday and 5th 
Sunday in May, 1925. Elder R. E. John- 
son is appointed to preach the introduc- 
tory sermon, Elder G. W. Boswell ap- 
pointed his alternate. Brethren, sisters, 
friends and ministers especially are cor- 
dially invited to attend. It is convenient 
to railroad in Pine Level. 

Yours respectfully, 
T J. A. BATTEN, Union Clerk. 

Wilson's Mills, N. C. 



ANGIER UNION 

The next session of the Angier Union 
will be held, if the Lord willing, with the 
church at Middle Creek on Saturday and 
5th Sunday in May, 1925, and we invite 
all true lovers of the truth in Christ to 
be with us in this meeting, and we ex- 
tend a special invitation to the minister- 
ing brethren to be with us. Those com- 
ng by railroad will be met at Garner eith- 
er Friday evening or Saturday morning 
by notifying Brother J. B. Britt or Elder 
E. C. Jones, McCullers, N. C. Route 1. 

We hope that some of our preaching 
brethren will have a mind to visit us at 
this time. 

A. H. DUPREE, Union Clerk. 

Willow Spring, N. C, Route 2. 



LOWER COUNTRY LINE UNION 
The next session of the Lower Country 
Line Union is appointed to be held with 
the church at Memorial cn the fifth Sat- 
urday and Sunday in Ma/. This church 
i3 at Stem, N. C, where visitors will be 
met. 

C. T. HALL, Union Clerk. 
Woodsdale, N. C. 



BLACK RIVER UNION 

Please announce that the next session 
of the Black River Union will convene 
with the church at B'ack River meeting 
house in the town of Dun:i, N. C, on the 
last Sunday and Saturday before in May. 
M. V. BLACKMAN, Union Clerk. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT : 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIII. JUNE 1, 1930 No. 14 



THE LORD, HE IS THE GOD. 

"And Elijah put the wood in order, and cut the bullock in pieces and 
laid him on the wood, and said fill four barrels with water, and pour it on 
the burnt sacrifice, and on the wood. And he said do it the second time. 
And they did it the second time, and he said, Do it the third time. And 
they did it the third time. And the water ran round about the altar; 
and he filled the trench also with water. 

And it came to pass at the time of his offering of the evening sacrifice, 
that Elijah the prophet came near, and said, Lord God of Abraham, Isaac 
and of Israel, let it be known this day that thou art God of Israel, and 
that I am thy servant, and that I have done all these things at thy word. 

Hear me, O Lord hear me, that this people may know that thou art the 
Lord God, and that thou hast turned their hearts back again. 

Then the fire of the Lord fell, and consumed the burnt sacrifice, and the 
wood and the stones and the dust, and licked up the water that was in the 
trench. 

And when all the people saw it, they fell on their face, and they said, 
The Lord, he is the God: the Lord, he is the God." — 1 Kings 18:32-39. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Bevoteb to tbe Cause of Jesus Cbdst 



HAS NO SCRIPTURAL SANCTION 

Mr. John D. Gold: 

There seems to be some Primi- 
tive Baptists that believe in what 
they call absolute or unlimited pre- 
destination of all things both good 
and bad ; but the late Sylvester Has- 
sell, who was moderator of the Ke- 
hukee Association for about 35 
years, never did endorse that doc- 
trine neither has the Kehukee As- 
sociation ever endorsed it nor does 
it now. 

We herewith enclose an editorial 
written by the late Sylvester Has- 
sell on that subject, and published 
Jan., 1903, in Messenger; and re- 
published Nov. 1928 in Advocate 
and Messenger. The editorial 
speaks for itself, and you are re- 
quested to publish what we have 
written and the editorial with Eld. 
Hassell's name just as it appears in 
same. 

A. B. Denson, Moderator, 

B. S. Cowin, Clerk of the 

Kehukee Association. 



The Gospel Messenger and "The 
Absolute Predestination 
of AH Things." 

"While Elders Respess, Mitchell, 
Henderson, and myself, Editors of 
the Gospel Messenger, have felt and 
said, with both tongue and pen, that 
the difference between the most of 
Primitive Baptists who reject and 
the most of those who receive the 
doctrine of "the absolute predesti- 
nation of all things" is a difference 
more in expression than in reality, 



yet we ourselves have never favor- 
ed or endorsed the phrase — "the 
absolute predestination of all 
things," and I will now state in a 
brief way our reasons: — 

1st. Because the phrase is not in 
the Scripture. 

2nd. Because it is not in any 
church Articles of Faith, and does 
not occur in uninspired literature 
before the year 1831. 

3rd. Because it totally ignores 
God — it does not say who did the 
predestination. 

4th. Because it does not make the 
slightest distinction between holi- 
ness and sin, but lumps them all in 
together, and apparently charges 
both of them to the predestinator ; 
although holiness and sin are infin- 
itely different, according to the tes- 
timony of the Holy Spirit in the 
heart of every child of God. 

5th. Because in the London and 
other Confessions of Faith which re- 
fer to all things either causatively 
or permissively to the sovereignty 
of God, the distinction between 
God's relation to holiness and sin is," 
to guard against misunderstanding, 
carefully given in the same sen- 
tence, by the declaration that God is 
not the author or approver of sin, 
and that He does not offer any vio- 
lence to the will of the creature, 
nor take away the liberty or contin- 
gency of second causes; and in 
other places of such Confession it is 
repeatedly declared, just as the 
Scriptures declare, that God per- 
mits, leaves, and gives over His 



210 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



creatures to sin without compelling' 
them to do so. 

6th. Because, although the first 
statement of this doctrine in 1832 
and its last statement in 1902 were 
unusually and commendably moder- 
ate, many of its advocates have in 
the past and do now run it into the 
most unscriptural, God-dishonoring, 
and man-ruining extremes. 

7th. Because the phrase is highly 
offensive to the most of our people 
and needs everlasting explanation 
and qualification to the great ma- 
jority of Primitive Baptists, who 
understand it to confound God and 
Satan, holiness and sin, therefore it 
should be abandoned by those who 
love God and holiness and their 
brethren more than they love a 
phrase devised or defended by any 
man or any set of men. The noble 
self-denying Apostle Paul says, "If 
meat make my brother to offend (or 
stumbles him or causes him to sin) , 
I will eat no flesh while the world 
standeth, lest I make my brother to 
offend." (I. Cor. 8:13). Paul was 
the most pointed writer on predesti- 
nation in the Scriptures, and yet he 
never used the phrase — "the abso- 
lute predestination of all things," 
or "God's predistination in all 
things." 

Predestination, like election, 
creation, redemption, regeneration, 
and resurrection, is a divine and in- 
finite depth which no finite mind 
can fathom. It is God's business, 
and not ours; and the more we dis- 
cuss it and try to explore and ex- 
plain it, the more mysterious it 
grows, and the more confused and 
divided and embittered against 
one another we become. It does not 
occupy one two-thousandth part of 
the Scriptures, and yet some of us 
seem disposed to make almost 



everything of it, and want to be 
talking and writing and arguing 
about it always. Moses, the wise 
leader and lawgiver of Israel, says, 
"Secret things belong unto the Lord 
our God; but those things which are 
revealed belong unto us and to our 
children forever, that we may do all 
the words of this law." (Deut. 29: 
29). And the most reverent chil- 
dren of God are content to be wise 
in and seek not to be wise above 
what is written,- but leave the great 
mysteries of Divine Revelation as 
the Holy Spirit has left them in the 
inspired Scriptures, and remember- 
ing that love is the fulfilling of the 
law, and is far more important than 
eloquence or knowledge or even 
faith and hope, they long to love 
their holy and merciful Father in 
heaven with all the powers of their 
souls, and to love their brethren as 
they love themselves, and to bear 
and forbear with them as they feel 
that they, in their own imperfec- 
tions, need to be borne and fore- 
borne with. 

Brethren, let us think, and write 
of what we know more about, of 
what we are more agreed upon, of 
what the Lord has done for us in 
our Christian experience, and of 
what He would have us to do in love 
towards Him and towards our fel- 
low-men, especially towards the 
household of faith, the members of 
the mystical body of Christ with 
whom, if we are what we profess to 
be, we are to live in perfect love and 
peace during the never-ending ages 
of eternity." 

Sylvester Hassell. 



EXPERIENCE. 

About 1892 I became troubled 
about my condition, did not know 
what was the trouble with me but 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



211 



about two years I was relieved of 
my burden, after then the Lord ap- 
peared to me and said you go to the 
old Baptist church and be baptized. 
It is the right church and the true 
church. In a few days one of my 
friends came to see me and asked 
me how I was. I told her I was 
troubled to death, I feel like I shall 
die, and she said I am glad to hear 
that. I said to her I would not wish 
a dog to be in my condition. 

Dear brethren and sisters after 
having all this trouble I will try to 
write some of my experience as to 
what the Lord has done for me as I 
have had a mind to do for some 
time. I have tried to get rid of it. 
but I cannot . I feel like if I do try 
I will rest better satisfied for I have 
tried to get rid of it so I feel like 
I am bound to write you a few lines 
to ease my hind. I have tried to 
live as close to the Lord as I could. 
I was young and I thought I was get- 
ting along all right. I lay down 
like tonight and I had a vision. I 
thought I was sitting in my back 
door and I saw a black cloud rising 
in the east and it covered the whole 
element and just before it reached 
the sun Christ came out of the sun 
and appeared at my back door. He 
looked at me and said, I have come 
to judge the people. I looked and 
the people were coming in every di- 
rection and when they met he said 
you all come to me and I will tell 
you where you will have to go and 
they did so and he sent them all to 
heaven except one and that one he 
told her she would have to go to tor- 
ment. You know I felt bad for it 
was my time next to ask and I felt 
condemned, but I ventured and ask- 
ed Him and He told me I could go to 
heaven. No one knows how I felt 
but some one that has been through 



the same. I did not feel worthy of 
such a happy place and when I rose 
the next morning I was burdened 
to death. I found myself to be a 
condemned sinner. Lord, I was mis- 
erable, could not eat nor sleep. I 
could rest no time at all, it appeared 
to me death was at the door and I 
was bound to die and if I died in the 
condition I was in, that torment was 
my doom. I would get up in the 
morning and go to the door and 
open it and Watch the sun rise and 
something would say to me, you will 
never live to see her set. How mis- 
erable then I was. I would have 
to watch her set and something 
would say to me you will never live 
to see her rise again, and it was that 
way for about six months. I would 
get their meals ready and get Wil- 
liam, my husband and the two little 
children seated at the table, and 
ask their father to feed them for I 
could not bear to eat a bit. My ap- 
petite was finally gone. I could 
not eat or sleep. Oh, how miser- 
able I was, a poor wretched sinner. 
It was the only thing that did me 
any good, was begging God to have 
mercy on me a poor vile sinner. It 
appeared to lighten my burden a 
few moments and at that time I 
truly did not know what my trouble 
was for I knew nothing about Prim- 
itive Baptists. I felt like I was 
bound to die but still I did not have 
a pain in my body, but at the Lord's 
own appointed time I was relieved 
of my troubles. I rose one morn- 
ing, my burden was gone. I threw 
open the door and everything look- 
ed like it was praising God in the 
highest even the pines and the grass 
and fields, it looked like a new 
world. I could not help praising 
my Savior for I felt good and happy. 
I am a poor helpless undone sinner, 



212 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



but I am thankful to know the Lord 
knows what I am, but I had not 
heard a sermon in eight years, for I 
had no way of going to church at 
that time, and I knew nothing of 
Primitive Baptist doctrine. I had 
never heard one preach. My health 
was poor. One night I had just 
gone to bed. I was not asleep for 
I had just lay down and the 
Lord appeared to me the prettiest 
man I ever saw, and he was bare- 
footed and had on a long red robe 
and he looked me in the face and 
said, You go to the old Baptist 
church for that is the right church 
and the true church, and be bap- 
tized. I felt like I could not stay 
away from my brethren and he ap- 
peared to me three different times 
and spoke the same words every 
time, and when he appeared the 
last time I was willing to obey. My 
health was bad and the doctor could 
not help me any. At last to my sur- 
prise one Saturday morning my hus- 
band came to the door and asked 
me if I didn't want to go to church 
that day. I said, Lord, that I do 
but I am not able. He said, don't 
have any excuse. I looked at the 
clock and said I cannot get ready on 
time. He said you will be in time, 
so he helped me to get ready and 
I went and when I got there they 
were going in the house and they 
sang a little and Brother Lancaster 
took his Bible and opened it, read 
and took his text and went to 
preaching and I asked the lady that 
sat by me who had told him about 
the condition I had been in so long, 
and she said, no one. Lord, how I 
felt. Then Brother Gardner got up 
and took his text and went to 
preaching and it appeared to me he 
preached to me and no one else. He 
told me what I had been troubled 



about better than I could myself. I 
had never seen any one join, but 
when I found myself I was sitting 
in front of the pulpit. Both of the 
brothers came to me and talked 
with me a few moments and they all 
received me and I was baptized on 
Sunday by Eld. John Gardner. 
Nearly all the neighbors told me it 
would kill me if I was baptized, my 
health was so bad, but I told them 
I had as well die with a chill as the 
fever. I went and was baptized 
and came back home and went to 
mending right away and did not 
take any more medicine. 

The half has not been told for I 
can not tell it for I am not worthy, 
for I do feel so unworthy to be 
among such good people, for if I am 
one at all I am the least of all. Oh 
if I could feel like they look to me 
it appears to me I would be satis- 
fied, but I feel so unworthy to be in 
their company. God bless them. 
I pray, Oh I want to be with them. 
Let us therefore ever follow after 
the things which make for peace 
and things wherewith one may 
edify another. Oh, may we do 
nothing but to love one another for 
he that loveth another hath fulfilled 
the law, for of him and through him 
and to him are all things to whom 
be glory forever. Let every soul be 
subject unto the higher power, for 
there is no power but of God. I 
want to live with them and I want 
to die with them and I want to be 
buried with them, for I love them 
and cannot help it. I have been 
through something. There has been 
one year of my life I could not go 
to preaching since I have been a 
member on account of poor 
health and I felt like I had gone 
and deceived the brethren, but I 
know I could not deceive God so I 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



213 



was in lots of trouble and on old 
Christmas eve I knelt by my bed 
side and prayed to him if it could be 
His will to show me before the day 
breaks next morning if I had de- 
ceived the brethren and sisters. I 
know I could not deceive God and 
that night I had a vision. I was 
standing on the porch and all at 
once there rose a tree not far from 
the edge of the yard the most beau- 
tiful tree I have ever seen. I spoke 
and said, Lord have mercy, what 
can that be and a voice spoke and 
said, this is the tree of life. I spoke 
and said, Lord it is beautiful and a 
voice spoke and said you and Gur- 
nie have a promise of life in this 
tree. I spoke and said, Lord have 
mercy on me. Oh that did strength- 
en my little hope. It is good to have 
the presence of the Lord with you. 
The little hope I have is all I have 
to lean upon, but I would not be 
without it for the world. I was sit- 
ting by myself in the room one day 
rocking my daughter's litle baby 
and I was studying my condition. 
I was left alone in this unfriendly 
world. My husband was dead and 
gone, my children all married and 
gone and I felt so lonely and sad. I 
was shedding tears and something 
like a dove passed the window and 
spoke to me clear and plain and 
said, comfort ye, comfort ye, I 
will be with you till the end. It 
made my poor soul leap for joy to 
think I have a friend so dear to me, 
but I am so often made to shed 
tears of joy. I do feel so unworthy 
and so unfit to take a seat with 
God's people, but I feel like if I 
could not take a seat with them I 
could not live. I want to live with 
them and die with them. God bless 
them, I pray. I love them and I 
can't help it. I do not feel like I am 



my own keeper and and it impos- 
sible for me to live as near the Lord 
as I wish to. I want to trust in 
Jesus through faith and that not of 
myself, it is a gift of God, not of 
works lest any man should boast. 
Life is weary, but a little hope is 
sweet for God's truth never gets old 
but stands as a guide to the weary 
traveler of Zion till they pass 
through the portals of death into 
the sunlight of eternal day. Let us 
love the Lord in duty. Let us also 
love one another for His sake. No 
good that I may ever do can purge 
my heart within, only with thy 
cleansing blood. I know he can 
cleanse my heart from sin. That is 
the only life that will endure is one 
that's kind and good and pure. 

Lou Frances Howell. 



CELEBRATING HIS 74TH 
BIRTHDAY. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

As Eld. J. T. Satterwhite is a con- 
tributor to your paper, and your 
readers know him that way, if not 
personally, I believe they, and you, 
will be interested in knowing of 
our last meeting held at La Grange 
Primitive Baptist Church, May 11. 
He is our pastor and has been seven- 
teen years. As this day was his 
birthday the membership decided 
to hold an all-day service, honoring 
his seventy-fourth birthday. Church 
friends, and others from far and 
near — some more than a hundred 
miles away — met with the church to 
show their love and esteem for him. 
All enjoyed the day which could be 
considered quite a success religious- 
ly and socially. 

Two services were held, Eld. Sat- 
terwhite having charge before noon, 
then a basket dinner was served, 
after which Elder. J. W. Harmon 



214 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



from Opelika, Ala., conducted the 
service. A spirit of true friendship 
and sweet fellowship was manifest- 
ed during both services, though 
no one joined. The noon hour was 
a happy one for all. 

At the close of the day, Eld. Sat- 
terwhite was presented with $100., 
a gift from church and friends. This 
amount is indeed small when com- 
pared to the high esteem in which 
he was held by the church and those 
who attended the birthday celebra- 
tion. Too much in praise can not 
be said of this man of God who has 
lived such a consecrated life — a full 
life of faithful service to his home, 
friends, churches and Maker. About 
three-fourths of his seventy-four 
years have been spent in preaching 
the gospel — always bearing the 
marks of a true minister. Many 
have been his afflictions and hard- 
ships, but he has borne them with- 
out complaint, looking to Him who 
will some day deliver him from 
them all. He is in very feeble 
health now, but his many friends 
everywhere are wishing for him 
many more years before he passes 
on. However, when that time shall 
come they feel assured he will be 
able to say. "I have fought a good 
fight, I have kept the faith, etc.," 
Then when the Great Day shall 
come, he will be among the number 
to whom it will be said, "Well 
done thou good and faithful ser- 
vant. Enter thou into the joys of 
thy Lord." 

Mrs. F. J. Pike, 
100 Hill St., LaGrange, Ga. 



A MEMBER 21 YEARS. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 
Gentlemen: 

I am sending you a new sub- 
scription to Zion's Landmark for 



Sister Lalia Dowling. She is a 
dear sister in belief and in the Lord 
I hope. She is very dear and close 
to me and how we esteem her in 
our church ! She is a loving sister 
to everybody. 

I have been a member of the Old 
Baptists for 21 years. I have been 
fed from the Master's table and 
have enjoyed many good moments 
which I can feast in my poor soul. 

My husband is a dear old Primi- 
tive Baptist preacher and I feel 
like the dear Lord sent him to 
preach for he was an uneducated 
boy, poor in this world's goods and 
I feel like the Lord has blessed him 
wonderfully to preach the un- 
searchable riches of our blessed 
Saviour. I don't have the privi- 
lege of going to church with him 
as much as I would like to for he is 
gone twice a month. He goes so 
far that I can't go with him. He 
has been preaching for 18 years 
and has served 3 churches most all 
the time and is serving 3 now. 

I am an unworthy believer of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ and saved by 
grace if saved at all. 

The wife of Eld. W. A. Simmons 
McClenny, Fla. 
Route 1, Box 70. 



LIKES THE LANDMARK 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 
Dear Elder Brothers: 

I have been receiving Zion's 
Landmark for more than a year, 
and it has been very comforting to 
me. I look forward to its coming 
as I would look for preaching time. 
However I have changed my ad- 
dress. So please change the paper. 
The old address was 116 Marion St. 
My present address is, 

Mrs. Ella Smith, 
Daytona Beach, Fla. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



215 



Zion's Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIII. No. 14 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C., JUNE 1, 1930 



WHAT IS HARD DOCTRINE? 

From time to time, in conversa- 
tion, from pulpits and through both 
secular and so-called religious pa- 
pers, strong criticisms are made of 
those, whose simple faith and be- 
liefs enable them to contend ear- 
nestly for the plain, simple yet 
glorious gospel truths, for which 
prophets of old, Christ in his min- 
istry, and his apostles and followers 
have ever contended as set forth in 
the scriptures. 

It remains a fact, that all the ridi- 
cule and sarcasm that men may 
vent, never changes the truth into 
error, nor has it in the past, in the 
present, nor, will it, in future years 
change the law of the Spirit of Life, 
in Christ Jesus, one iota; nor pre- 
vent the spiritual law of life from 



making free, the children of God, 
from the law of sin and death. 

Jesus suffered persecution from 
the self-righteous world. We read, 
"If ye suffer with Him, ye shall also 
reign with him," and that the suf- 
ferings of this world are not worthy 
to be compared with the glories to 
be revealed, in the life of the chil- 
dren of God here and hereafter. 

Jesus said "He that eateth my 
flesh and drinketh my blood, dwell- 
eth in me, and I in him." John 6:56. 
Those who only had a carnal con- 
ception of his words did not believe 
them. 

We read, "As the living Father 
hath sent me, and I live by the 
Father; so he that eateth me, even 
he shall live by me. This is the 
bread which cometh down from 
heaven; not as your fathers did eat 
manna, and are dead; he that eat- 
eth of this bread shall live forever." 
John 6:57-58. 

Jesus taught these things in the 
Jewish synagogue in Capernaum, 
and many of his disciples said, 
"This is a hard saying; who can 
hear it?" 

They had heard it with the nat- 
ural ear; but did not understand its 
spiritual meaning. Did Jesus hear 
their murmurings? Probably not 
with the natural ear; but we read, 
"When Jesus in himself knew that 
His disciples murmured at His 
words, He said unto them, Doth 
this offend you?" 

If men were offended at the 
teachings of our Lord, it is no mar- 
vel that carnally minded men mur- 
mur now when men contend ear- 
nestly for the same spiritual truths 
for which Christ and His Apostles 
contended in their day. 

In that day, the disciples and fol- 



216 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



lowers of Jesus were blest with the 
personal touch and simple teaching 
of the greatest teacher of all time, 
the man Christ Jesus, who spake as 
never man spake, and yet many 
were offended at His words. 

To this unbelieving people Jesus 
said, "It is the Spirit that quicken- 
eth; the flesh profiteth nothing; the 
words that I speak unto you, they 
are spirit and they are life." "I am 
the living bread which came down 
from heaven ; If any man eat of this 
bread, he shall live forever ,and the 
bread that I will give is my flesh, 
which I will give for the life of the 
world." John 6-51. 

The flesh is vain and ever ready 
to take offense when it is set at 
naught, except when it is crucified 
with Christ, with all its affections 
and lusts. Men who talk, preach 
or write in such a way as to show to 
the unbelieving world, that they 
have no confidence in the flesh, in 
so far as it relates to a spiritual 
work or service; save as the fleshly 
minded man may be moved to ser- 
vice by the Spirit of the Lord, such 
teaching, ever has been and ever 
will be unpopular, and even de- 
spised by those who feel to be suf- 
ficient of themselves to render 
such service unto God as will bring 
God under obligation to bless them 
for service and not in service. 

The average moiern religionist 
of the day emphasizes personal en- 
deavor to the end that God will 
bless according to the effort. The 
scriptures make it very clear that a 
spiritual work cannot be performed 
save as men and women are moved 
to work through and by the opera- 
tion of the Holy Spirit. 

Jesus, the only sinless man of all 
time, said, "I can of mine own self 
do nothing, and says further "For 



as the Father hath life in himself; 
so hath He given to the Son to have 
life in Himself," thus proving, be- 
yond dispute, that; every good as 
well as every perfect gift cometh 
down from the Father of lights with 
whom there is no variableness, 
neither shadow of turning. 

Persecution, being buffetted, 
beaten with stripes, prison bonds, 
ridicule and all the ignominious, ill 
treatment, that befell Christ and 
His Apostles, Disciples, and on those 
who have believed on Him through 
their word, has never diminished 
the love of God for His people nor 
has it hindered Him in bringing to a 
saving knowledge of the Lord Jesus 
Christ, all those who have felt, now 
feel, or that may yet feel the great 
need of the mercy of the Lord; for, 
like as a father pitieth his children 
so doth the Lord pity those who 
come, broken in spirit, as humble 
beggars at a throne of grace, ask- 
ing, not for justice or reward; but 
asking, for mercy and pardon. 

Jesus said many things that 
worldly minded men think is hard 
doctrine. Let us review some of 
His hard sayings, as the world looks 
at such things. 

(1) "Of myself I can do nothing." 

(2) "They that are in the flesh 
do mind the things of the flesh." 

(3) "To be carnally minded is 
death." 

(4) "The carnal mind is enmity 
against God, not subject to the law 
of God, neither indeed can be." 

(5) "They that are in the flesh 
cannot please God." 

(6) "If Christ be in you, the body 
is dead because of sin; but the 
spirit is life because of righteous- 
ness." 

(7) "All your righteousness is of 
me saith the Lord." 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



217 



Surely the seven witnesses, 
Christ's own words, are sufficient to 
show beyond dispute that man, in 
his carnality, cannot worship God, 
acceptably. 

As we have given seven quota- 
tions showing the impossibility of 
man, void of the spirit, worshiping 
or serving the Lord, let us here re- 
cord seven of the many quotations 
showing the temporal and eternal 
security of all the people of God, 
who are, as shown in the scriptures, 
an innumerable host, of every land, 
nation, kindred and tongue, who 
have been redeemed by the blood 
of the Lamb, and who shall come 
from the four quarters of the earth, 
from the seas and from their graves, 
to meet and greet the Lord, together 
with those who shall live and abide 
unto the day of his second coming, 
and with whom they shall be caught 
up in the air, forever to be with the 
Lord. 

(1) "I am the good shepherd, the 
good shepherd giveth His life for 
the sheep." 

(2) "I know my sheep and am 
known of mine." 

(3) "My sheep hear my voice, 
and I know them, and they follow 
me; and I give unto them eternal 
life, and they shall never perish, 
neither shall any pluck them out of 
my Father's hand." 

(4) "I and my Father are one." 

(5) "I am the resurrection and 
the life; he that believeth in me, 
though he were dead, yet shall he 
live, and whosoever liveth and be- 
lieveth in me shall never die." 

(6) "I thank Thee O, Father, 
Lord of Heaven and Earth, that 
Thou hast hid these things from the 
wise and prudent; but hath reveal- 
ed them unto babes." 

(7) "In My Father's House are 



many mansions, if it were not so I 
would have told you. I go to pre- 
pare a place for you, and if I go and 
prepare a place for you, I will 
come again and receive you unto 
myself; that where I am there ye 
may be also." 

Is it any wonder that those who 
believe as Jesus believed and taught 
are called old fogy and out date, 
and are accused of believing all 
manner of things not taught among 
us, since the worldly are spoken of 
as ever learning and never coming 
to the knowledge of the truth. 

The Angel of the Lord, proclaim- 
ed salvation through Christ, "For 
unto us a child is born, a son is giv- 
en, His name shall be called won- 
derful, councillor, the everlasting 
Father and the Prince of Peace, and 
of His government and peace there 
shall be no end to order it and es- 
tablish it, with Judgment and with 
Justice, even forever." 

"O the depths of the riches both 
of the wisdom and knowledge of 
God, how unsearchable are His 
judgments and His ways past find- 
ing out." 

In hope, 

O. J. DENNY. 



TO OPEN THEIR EYES. 

Acts 26:18. To open their eyes, 
and to turn them from darkness to 
light, and from the power of Satan 
unto God, that they may receive for- 
giveness of sins, and inheritance 
among them which are sanctified by 
faith that is in me. Paul was 
brought before King Agrippa, and 
told by him that he was permitted 
to speak for himself and the verse 
quoted is a part of what he told the 
king. He told of his first knowl- 
edge of Jesus Christ. Although 
he had been a strict religionist for a 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



long time he had not known Jesus, 
or believed in Him as the Son of 
God. Neither did he desire to 
know Him. He was an enemy to 
Jesus, and doing all he could 
against him. But Jesus knew Saul 
of Tarsus, and he was a chosen ves- 
sel unto him to bear his name 
among the Gentiles, as he told 
Ananias in Damascus. Paul after- 
wards taught that God loved his 
people even when they were dead 
in trespasses and sins, which evi- 
dently was true in his case, and the 
Lord having a people among the 
Gentiles, will bring them to his 
fold, as he said other sheep I have 
that are not of this fold, them also 
I must bring and there shall be one 
fold and one shepherd. John 10:16. 
We note that Paul is sent to open 
the eyes of the Gentiles, not to call 
them from death to life. The pow- 
er to raise the dead is in God, alone. 
Jesus said, as the Father raiseth up 
the dead and quickeneth them even 
so the Son also quickeneth whom 
He will. Now Jesus came to Saul 
just before he entered Damascus, 
and quickened him, and told him 
that he had appeared to make him 
a minister, both of the things he had 
seen and of that which he would af- 
terwards show him. So we see that 
ministers of the gospel of Christ are 
made by him, and he shows them 
the things to which they are to 
testify. "This gospel of the king- 
dom shall be preached in all the 
world for a witness unto all nations ; 
and then shall the end come. Mat- 
thew 24:14. The preached gospel 
does not quicken dead sinners, but 
opens their eyes to a clear under- 
standing of the truth as it is in 
Jesus. Peter went to the house of 
Cornelius, but Jesus had been there 
and told him to send for Peter, and 



when he got there he preached 
Jesus to those gathered together 
and the Holy Ghost fell on them, 
and their eyes were opened to see 
the duty of Baptism. The Lord 
sent Phillip to preach to the Eunuch 
who wanted to know the truth as 
it is taught in the scriptures, and 
Philip preached Jesus to him and 
his eyes were opened to see as he 
had never seen before, and Paul 
and others preached the doctrine of 
grace to Jews and Gentiles and their 
eyes were opened to see that Salva- 
tion is of the Lord, and that all the 
praise is due to him. So every 
truth taught by the apostles and 
ministers of the gospel, to that ex- 
tent opens the eyes of those for- 
mally unestablished in Bible truth. 
We send a child to school, he has 
life, but does not know its mother 
tongue, but every lesson the teacher 
gets that child to understand to that 
extent he has turned the child from 
darkness to light, as in nature so in 
grace it is only the living that is or 
can be taught, and as all error is of 
satan ,when the child of God is turn- 
ed away from error he is turned 
from the power of Satan unto God, 
and as following error and the prac- 
tice of that which is false or not 
taught in the word of God is sin, 
when they see the right way and 
walk therein they receive forgive- 
ness of sins and also inheritance 
among them that are sanctified (or 
set apart) by their faith in Christ 
to the true service of His holy name. 
So we see that preaching the gospel 
did not quicken sinners in the days 
of the apostles but was intended by 
the Lord to comfort and instruct 
those who were already born of 
God. It pleased God by the fool- 
ishness of preaching to save them 
that believe. Not the unbeliever, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



219 



but the believer is saved by preach- 
ing the truth to him, not from sin 
and hell, but from the worship of 
false gods. Then how careful 
those who preach to others should 
be to obey Paul's solemn charge to 
Timothy to study to show themsel- 
ves approved unto God, workmen 
that need not to be ashamed, rightly 
dividing the word of truth, give to 
each his portion in due season, not 
both saint and sinner as is some- 
times said, but each child of God, 
young or old, and in every line of 
service that they may be instructed 
according to the word of God. How 
good and profitable it is for the 
preacher to show to each their 
proper place in the kingdom and 
each one abiding in his calling. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



"THE COMMON SALVATION" 

Jude addresses the sanctified, 
preserved and called of God in the 
relationship of "beloved," saying, 
"When I gave all diligence to write 
unto you of the common salvation," 
he felt it needful to exhort, having a 
common interest in all the Lord's 
people, both Jew and Gentile, that 
they should earnestly contend for 
the faith, or that system of doctrine 
once delivered to them ; and, in sec- 
ondary sense, that inward faith in 
the heart unto righteousness, and 
confession by mouth unto salvation. 
Possibly, he may have been given a 
prophetic eye to see how some in 
the church, in this age, would tra- 
duce the faith by teaching that the 
saints obtain "the common salva- 
tion" by obedience and good works. 
But there is nothing in that term, or 
the context to warrant such teach- 
ing.. Would it not be amazingly 
strange that finite men should get 
wise above what is written, vessels 



of the Lord's grace and mercy, even 
"the work of his hand," who "are 
the clay and He is the potter," will 
so far forget their experience and 
deny that salvation, and even the 
things that accompany it, are solely 
of the Lord? Unquestionably, it is 
in this time state, where the chosen 
need and receive salvation ; "for by 
grace are ye saved through faith," 
saith Paul. In heaven the "be- 
loved" will never need faith or sal- 
vation, as they are to be forever 
with Jesus in glory and like Him, 
reaping the joys and harvest of 
grace in its fullness. 

The conscious blessings of "well 
done, good and faithful servant," 
are often realized in Christian pil- 
grimage no one will deny, but the 
results are obtained by the volition 
of their own free will or option, is 
what I question. It is claimed by 
some that the elect, in regeneration 
are given ability to keep all the 
Lord's commands, and that their 
blessings are conditioned upon 
keeping them, which, if true, would 
dispense with prayer for grace to 
help in time of need. 

This modern doctrine, "believers 
conditional salvation," which has 
crept into our ranks in the last sixty 
years, has caused more confusion 
and disruption than any innovation, 
since Andrew Fuller introduced the 
unscriptural mission-spirit in 1792. 

Now and for many years, certain 
leaders in the church are wont to 
take matters that pertain to life 
and godliness out of the covenant 
of grace, and place them back un- 
der the law, in the sense that those 
who are "born again" are able to 
render true worship and acceptable 
service to God without the leading 
and power of the Holy Spirit. Even 
some are claiming to be "free- 



220 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



willers" — free to obey or not obey, 
to serve or not serve. Webster de- 
fines, "free," to mean, "not being 
under restraint, necessity, physical 
or moral." Where will such find a 
scriptural injunction granting be- 
lievers "liberty" to obey or disobey? 
What obligation would a servant 
owe his master if he should be 
granted the right to work or play? 
Such a privilege might be called a 
"liberty-actor" — one without re- 
straint or necessity. 

Mr. "Free-willer" says, "I be- 
lieve God desires willing service." 
Then asks, "Do you think He wants 
unwilling service?" No; but God 
says "his people shall be a willing 
people in the day of his power," and 
"without me ye can do nothing." 
Free agency is worth nothing when 
without will or power. Men drink 
freely when thirsty, and eat freely 
when hungry; but when neither 
thirsty nor hungry, would they do 
so? How can men be free-agents 
when they do things that are neces- 
sary? Is there no necessity or re- 
straint in obedience? Is not an 
agent acting for another? Or is he 
free to act from "assumed liberty?" 
Some many mean that they obtain a 
salvation not of the Lord or by 
grace, by doing more than their 
duty, or were under obligation to 
do. Did not the Lord say( "When 
ye shall have done all things which 
are commanded you, say, We are 
unprofitable servants?" Not say 
you have gained a salvation by 
doing your duty, and are now prof- 
itable to the Lord and self. But the 
doing of more than duty or obliga- 
tion may be to the credit of "condi- 
tional-believers-salvation." But it 
may have not been thought of by 
the Saviour at that time that his 
people in the latter days would do a 



surplus service and work. I do not 
recall that I ever heard these say 
they had done more than their 
duty ; but the little and poor in spirit 
will say, they have come short, 
doing things they should not do, and 
leaving undone things they should 
have done. 

It seems that the pet text of our 
brethren who would transfer the 
"common salvation" into an uncom- 
mon salvation by free obedience 
and good works, is found in Phil. 
2:13. But the ones, who believe 
that they are saved by grace, which 
is the common salvation, have found 
that the result and power therein 
experienced were from God work- 
ing in them both to will and to do. 

Also the "common faith," refer- 
red to by Paul, is the same faith of 
all who are made to believe in God 
by "the working of His mighty 
power." Without controversy the 
"common salvation" is the salva- 
tion by which the heirs of God are 
saved in every age from all sins 
from their birth till their death, re- 
ceiving a complete deliverance from 
every foe and soul damning danger, 
and a full salvation to every spirit- 
ual good, both for time and eternity. 

Truly men have received provi- 
dential deliverance and special sal- 
vation in many ways, but none of 
these were soul blessings. When 
Peter saw Christ walking on the 
water he asked leave to go to Him, 
and while going, he saw the wind 
boisterous, he was afraid; and he 
beginning to sink, cried, saying, 
Lord save me," and when Jesus had 
saved him from drowning, he said 
unto him, "O, thou of little faith, 
wherefore didst thou doubt?" If 
Peter had a free will at this time, it 
was severely acted upon. At an- 
other time the Lord had told Peter 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



221 



and the other apostles that without 
Him they could do nothing. But 
Peter had to be converted from his 
free agency and creature ability by 
a bitter personal experience. I 
have heard a few of our preachers 
say, who had more zeal than knowl- 
edge, that Peter had the power to 
keep from denying his Lord, and 
could have done so. With Paul 
may I say? "Let God be true, but 
every man a liar," who would dis- 
pute the Master's word. For when 
Peter said, "I am ready to go with 
thee, both to prison and death, Jesus 
replied saying, "The cock shall not 
crow this day, before that thou shalt 
thrice deny that thou knowest me." 
When the hour of trial came Peter 
had neither free-will nor creature 
power to keep from denying the 
Lord. So, I am as ready to believe 
what Peter said as any conditional- 
ist, who says believers can do and 
keep all the Lord commands them 
to do, from the power of that life 
given them in the new birth. Now 
let me say, I do not question but 
what God enables his people to keep 
his commands; but it is only, when 
the word of God comes from God to 
them; but that the life of the re- 
generated was the enabling power, 
is what I do not believe. The Lord 
being with the Hebrew children in 
the furnace, made one-seventh hot- 
ter than necessary to destroy life, 
was why they did not perish ; and 
so, likewise with Daniel in the den 
of fierce lions. 

The followers of Alexander 
Campbell will tell all that have 
lived long enough to be accountable 
for their sins, that if they will hear, 
believe and obey the preached word 
that they will be eternally saved, 
with one proviso — must keep obey- 
ing until death. These folks might 



be termed "free-actors," for they 
hinge eternal life and salvation up- 
on their ability to do the necessary 
works, while Paul would tell them 
that salvation is by grace, and not 
by works, even righteous works. 
But they will not believe him. Some 
of our brethren believe in salvation 
by grace, and think that brethren 
should use the form of sound speech 
cannot see but a shade of difference 
in the "doctrines" of those who hold 
that eternal salvation is conditional, 
and those who advocate that time 
salvation is conditional. But I love 
and cannot non fellowship these 
brethren, who advocate "believers- 
conditional - time - salvation," from 
tradition; for when you have a 
heart to heart talk with them, every 
one says that is "born again," that 
without the Lord they can do noth- 
ing spiritually, and that it is the 
Holy Spirit that leads and guides 
into all truth. All who love God 
and His people should be willing to 
labor in love to convert these dear 
children from their unscriptural 
teaching; yea, may I say, save them 
from error in doctrine, and with all 
our natural ability labor to save all 
we can from temporal and moral 
wrongs, and transgressions; but I 
know it is impossible for me or any 
other man to cleanse any from sin, 
or fit them for immortal life by 
anything I can do or say. Christ 
Jesus was made to be sin for his peo- 
ple, and on the cross He fulfilled 
the law on their behalf, and every 
condition relative to life, salvation, 
godliness and righteousness, leaving 
none to be substituted by the sinner, 
believer, or any for Himself to be 
done, in order to complete salva- 
tion of all his people. Repentance, 
faith, hope, love, obedience, good 
works, and victory, are not condi- 



222 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



tions of salvation, but the effects 
thereof. Many religionists think 
that God deals now with the people 
only through the written word. Do 
any among us believe that the many 
commands and injunctions in the 
scriptures are obligations for his 
children to do and obey? Where 
is the gospel servant that was led 
to preach from the power of the 
commission to the apostles, "Go ye 
into all the world and preach the 
gospel to every creature?" If there 
had been no special or direct call 
to preach there would be but few, if 
any today, that would be move 
with Paul to say, "Woe is unto me, 
if I preach not the gospel." 

Any precept or command taught 
in the scriptures must get into the 
heart by the power of the Spirit to 
be effective. There is a cause for 
every effect. Evidently, when the 
word of God comes from God to a 
man there will be a response; for 
the creature is made willing in the 
day of his power. Many of the 
Lord's commands are so displeas- 
ing to the carnal mind that they are 
resisted with all the energy of its 
strength, as did Jonah. He was 
made to cry "out of the belly of 
hell" when God brought up his life 
from corruption; and he being will- 
ing to avow, what all his children 
must do at God's time, "Salvation is 
of the Lord." 

M. L. GILBERT. 



ELDER J. C. HOOKS. 

Dear Brother Denny: 

It has been my desire and intention for 
sometime to write something of the life 
and death of our beloved pastor who has 
passed on from this life to one that is far 
better. As we all know Brother Hooks 
was one of the most gifted men of this age 
that any one can recall. The Lord had a 
purpose in calling him. For he had served 
his time on earth, and it was spent in the 
greatest service that human being could 
render to this world. For the Lord had 



called and qualified him to preach the 

unsearchable riches of Christ and his king- 
dom, which was of such a great comfort 
to so many many weary fainting children 
of the true and living God. And not only 
the one's that believed as he did loved 
him and what he preached, but the world 
could see that he was a man of God. We 
all know that he had been taught of the 
Lord and had been blessed to see and un- 
derstand great things which many of us 
could not understand. And even though 
he is dead, there lives in my memory some 
of the many beautiful texts that he preach- 
ed so comfortingly from. One of them 
was, "Arise my love, my fair one, and 
come away, for lo the winter is past, the 
rain is over and gone. The flowers ap- 
pear on the earth. The time for singing 
of birds has come, and the turtle dove is 
heard in our land." This may not be the 
exact words, but this is pretty much the 
way it reads. Any way it is a beautiful 
scripture and it applies only to the child 
of God. I heard him preach so beautifully 
from one beautiful Sunday morning in 
Fremont. They also sang a song with these 
words. I can recall one other song that 
he so often gave out, "Thou dear redeemer, 
dying lamb, we love to hear of thee; no 
music is like thy charming name, nor half 
so sweet can be. Oh, let me ever hear 
thy voice, in mercy to me speak, etc." 
Another one of his texts was, "Comfort 
ye, comfort ye, my people saith your God, 
speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, cry un- 
to her that her warfare is ended, and that 
her iniquity is pardoned, and she shall re- 
ceive at tthe Lord's hand double for all of 
her sins." I can almost hear him read 
these beautiful words they mean so much 
to me. For there are times with me when 
I feel as he said he did at times, and that 
was, that it was his promise, and I have 
the sweet hope that this is my precious 
promise. And in his preaching he often 
mentioned Sampson's prayer which fitted 
my case and many has been the times with 
me that I felt the need of this prayer. 
"Lord remember me this once." Just 
now I recall a beautiful dream that I had 
once before he died, I was at Aycock's 
Church with Brother Hooks and a few 
others, I can't recall any one of them, but 
while standing up near the stove we all 
were looking up toward heaven and saw 
Jesus caught up and go away up into 
heaven, and it was made known to us that 
just as he has gone away up into heaven 
so in like manner shall he return again. 
He is coming to this earth again to gather 
together in one body his chosen elect and 
what more could any one need than to be 
cheered with the sweet hope that when 
done with this life that we will be through 
suffering, sorrow, and sin. As we all 
know, Job was a man of sorrows, and ac- 
quainted with grief, so is every true child 
of God. Brother Hooks often mentioned 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



228 



Job and Jonah in his preaching which are 
to my mind two blessed characters even 
though they did undergo afflictions and 
chastisement. He also spoke often of Dan- 
iel in the lions den and the three children 
in the fiery furnace. I love to think of 
these characters. Knowing that surely 
the Lord was with them or else Daniel 
would have been devoured, but the Lord 
was able to lock his jaws and Daniel was 
safe. And the Lord was also with the 
children in the fiery furnace, else they 
would have been burned to death. And 
the Lord is with His people today just as 
He was then. They are protected and up- 
held by the very same God that locked 
the lion's jaws. When I can feel the pres- 
ence of my God with me I don't fear any- 
thing, all is well with me, not even satan. 
But when he withdraws his presence from 
me, nothing goes well with me. It is such 
a wonderful thing to be reconciled to what- 
ever befalls us, to be in a state to praise 
and adore instead of to murmur and com- 
plain, but so often we are in this state. I 
hope that I am thankful for the many, 
many blessings that have been bestowed 
upon me all the days of my life. I feel 
that I can say of a trtuh that there has 
been so many instances in my life where 
the power of the Lord has manifested in 
my life not because I have been so good 
and deserved such blessings, but because 
it seemed good in his sight. He came not 
to save the righteous but sinners and even 
though I am not worthy of such a prize, 
the Lord saw fit I hope to open my eyes 
that- I might see, and my heart that I 
might understand many of his great and 
marvelous works to the children of men. 
Therefore I am blessed to go on my way 
rejoicing in one that has all power both 
in heaven and in earth. "Blessed are 
they that know the joyful sound, for they 
shall walk O Lord in the light of thy coun- 
tenance," What a glorious privilege. It 
is beyond explanation. Sometimes I feel 
it is too much for me to enjoy. But I am 
thankful, 1 hope, that the Lord saw fit to 
manifest his goodness to me early in life. 
I joined the church at nineteen and was 
baptized one beautiful Sunday morning in 
June, and this was and has been to me 
the greatest day of my life. Brother 
Hooks baptized me and sister Stella Saul 
at the same time. She joined on Saturday 
at Aycock's and I joined at the water. 
She said as we were coming out of the 
water that she hoped she would always be 
as happy. Brother Hooks told her that 
she wouldn't be though. 

"The weapon of our warfare is not car- 
nal, but mighty through God to the pull- 
ing down of the stronghold." There has 
been through all ages of time a question 
as to there being a supreme God that rules 
here on earth. There is such a beautiful 
and wonderful manifestation of God's 



power in so many instances that it seems 
that all human could see, and yet with- 
out the revelation of these things it is im- 
possible to believe them. The scriptures 
say that He opens and none can shut, shuts 
and none can open. Hence no man by 
searching can find out God. The sun, 
moon and stars are one of the most beau- 
tiful and sure proofs of some power above 
man's power. Who is able to command 
them to shine and who is able to cause 
darkness and day? Who can command the 
rain and snow to come forth or bid it to 
cease to come? Who created the beast of 
the fields and the fowls of the air? Who 
can calm the mighty ocean and winds? 
Who can give life to anything? All this 
is impossible with man. How much more 
able is man to give spiritual life? And 
still there are people that claim that if 
a person just will do all these things they 
will have eternal life. I am glad that the 
Lord in His eternal arrangement didn't 
have anything for me to do in order to in- 
herit eternal life. But rather rejoice in 
the fact that I am trusting in an all-wise 
supreme being who is able to thwart every 
purpose of satan, and to uphold my weak 
and feeble knees, speak peace and joy and 
rest to my troubled soul, and at last save 
me. 

As many of us know Brother Hooks had 
many friends, and there were so many sad 
and broken hearts when the news came 
that he was dead. The day he was buried 
was a very rainy day, but in spite of this 
there were many attended the funeral and 
many didn't go that would have if not 
providentially hindered. The churches 
that he cared for were especially hurt and 
felt that they were ruined. But they 
won't be, because the God that prepared 
him to preach is still able to prepare an- 
other. Still no one can exactly fill his 
place in one sense of the word, and still 
his churches are wonderfully blessed with 
gifted preachers, and they are greatly 
loved and esteemed. 

Will stop now, for the half has never 
yet been told. 

ANNIE HOOKS. 



MRS. C. J. HUGHES. 

The sweet soul of our loved one, Mrs. 
C. J. Hughes, was taken from these mortal 
shores Jan. 27, 1930, at the age of 33 
years, to the bosom of her Savour whom 
she trusted and loved so much. 

Mrs. Hughes was the youngest daugh- 
ter of Eld. J. F. Spangler of Draper, N. C. 
She first married W. R. Lawrence, who 
preceded her to the grave in May 19 20. 

She leaves husband, seven children, 
father, mother, four brothers and three 
sisters to mourn their loss. 

She was a member of Primitive Bap- 
tist Church of Spray, N. C. 

While she was confined to her bed for 



224 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



about three years with T. B., she was 
reconciled to the Providence of God. 

Oh how I love her memory, today as I 
write these lines amidst tears, she being 
the first one I told of receiving a sweet 
hope in Jesus. Our communications to- 
gether of God and His grace shall ever re- 
main with me. 

Services were conducted by Elders J. A. 
Ward and W. R. Dodd, Jan. 28, 1930, at 
Dan River Primitive Baptist church, after 
which her body was laid to rest in Dan 
River cemetery to wait the call of her 
Saviour whom we feel will fashion her 
body like unto His glorious body. 

Written by her brother, 

D. V. SPANGLER. 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE ASSOCIATION. 

The Upper Country Line Primitive Bap- 
tist Association to her correspondence, 
Greeting: The next session of our Associa- 
tion will convene, the Lord willing, with 
the Church at Lick Fork meeting-house, 
which is located about two miles south- 
east of Ruffin, N. C. Those coming from 
either North or South would come over 
number 70 highway to Ruffin, and from 
there over top-soil road to meeting house. 
Those coming from East or West would 
come over number 65 highway to Lawson- 
ville, a point some eight miles north-east 
of Reidsville), and there leave the hard 
surface for the meeting-house, a distance 
of about two miles. If you plan to come 
by train, and you have no acquaintance in 
either Reidsville or Ruffin, write C. L. 
Saunders, Church Clerk, Reidsville, N. C, 
and he will arrange for you and give you 
direction, provided you write in time for a 
reply. The time when our Association 
meets is as follows: Saturday 26th, 4th 
Sunday, the 27th, and Monday, the 28th 
day of July, 1930. The position of this 
Association with reference to doctrine, or- 
der, and disorder, has been well defined, 
and all who are in good standing at home 
and in fellowship with us are cordially in- 
vited to attend our Association. Come to 
see us. 

J. W. GILLIAM, Jr., 
Association Clerk. 



ELDER HANKS CHANGES HIS ADDRESS 

Elder Lee Hanks writes that he has 
changed his address from No. 2 Edwin 
Place to 1800 North Decatur Road, At- 
lanta, Ga. 



THE CONTENTNEA UNION. 

The next session of the Contentnea 
Union will be held with the church at 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe Co., N. C. the 
fifth Saturday and Sunday in June, 1930. 

Elder J. E. Mewborn was appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon and Elder 
A. M. Crisp as alternate. 



Pleasant Hill Church is about 5 miles 
East of Rocky Mount. 

A special invitation is extended our 
ministering brethren. 

J. E. MEWBORN, 

Union Clerk. 



UNION MEETING AT SANDY GROVE 

The next session of the Angier Union is 
appointed to be held with the church at 
Sandy Grove, Johnston County, Saturday 
and fifth Sunday in June, 1930. Elder L. 
H. Stephenson has been chosen to preach 
the introductory sermon and Elder T. F. 
Adams is alternate. 

Sandy Grove Church is located about 
three miles east of Angier and on the An- 
gier-Smithfield Highway. All lovers of 
Truth are invited to meet with us especial- 
ly the ministering brethren. 

W. F. YOUNG, 

Union Clerk. 

Angier, N. C. 



LOWER COUNTRY LINE UNION. 
Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

You will please publish in the Land- 
mark that the next session of the Lower 
Country Line Union was appointed to be 
held (the Lord willing) with the church at 
Eno, Durham County, N. C, Saturday and 
fifth Sunday in June, 1930. 

All lovers of the truth and good order 
are cordially invited to attend. We hope 
that some of our preaching brethren will 
have a mind to visit us at this time. 

A. P. CLAYTON, 

Union Clerk. 

Roxboro, N. C. 



THE EASTERN UNION 

The Eastern Union is to be held with 
the church at Tiny Oak, to commence Sat- 
urday before the fifth Sunday in June, A 
cordial invitation is extended to all who 
will come, especially ministers. 

A. W. AMBROSE, Clerk. 



THE SKEWARKEY UNION. 

The next session of the Skewarkey 
Union is appointed to be held with the 
church at Williams meeting house, Edge- 
combe County, about 8 miles east of Rocky 
Mount, N. C, on Friday, Saturday and 
fifth Sunday in June 1930. 

An invitation is extended to brethren, 
sisters and friends, and a special invita- 
tion to ministers. 

R. A. BAILEY, Union Clerk 



MILL BRANCH UNION 

The Mill Branch Union is to be held 
with the church at Bethel. All lovers of 
truth are invited. 

M. MEARES. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

AT -— -~--T =r-_ : 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII. JUNE 15, 1930 NO. 15 



THERE WAS A GREAT RAIN. 

And Elijah said unto thein, Take the prophets of Baal ;let not one of 
them escape. And they took them: and Elijah brought them down to 
the brook Kishon, and slew them there. 

And Elijah said unto Ahab, get thee up and eat and drink; for there 
is a sound of abundance of rain. 

So Ahab went up to eat and drink. And Elijah went to the top of 
Carmel ;and he cast himself down upon the earth, and put his face be- 
tween his knees. 

And said to his servant, Go up now, look toward the sea. And he went 
up, and looked and said, There is nothing. And he said go again seven 
times. 

And it came to pass at the seventh time, that he said, Behold there 
ariseth a little cloud out of the sea, like a man's hand. And he said, 
go up, say unto Ahab, Prepare thy chariot, and get thee down, that the 
rain stop thee not. 

And it came to pass in the meanwhile, that the heaven was black with 
clouds and wind, and there was a great rain. And Ahab rode and went 
to Jezreel. 

And the hand of the Lord was on Elijah; and he girded up his loins, 
and ran before Ahab to the entrance of Jezreel. — 1 Kings 18:40-46. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which, he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 



Wilson, N. C. 



fcton'e Xanfcmarfc 

©evoteo to tbe Cause of ^esus Christ 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

To the Churches of the 
Nolachuckey Association: 
Beloved Brethren: 

We desire to stir up your pure 
minds upon the important doctrine 
of the total depravity of man. I 
feel impressed to offer some of my 
views to the churches; some of my 
thoughts on this subject of total de- 
pravity. The truth of this subject 
is much scorned today by the re- 
ligious Arminian world. Jesus' 
name is the most popular name 
used among this God-forgetting 
world, yet they hate his doctrine. 
They hate the doctrine that he and 
his disciples taught. They hate, 
yes, today, the same doctrine that 
Jesus and. the Apostles, and God's 
people in all ages of the world have 
taught. Let us examine and see 
what doctrine and practice distin- 
guished Christ's churches along that 
line. Let us see if we as Primitive 
Baptists stand in line with the Apos- 
tles and Prophets. As Paul said to 
the church, and built upon the 
foundation, to the Apostles and 
prophets, Jesus Christ himself being 
the chief cornerstone on whom all 
the building fitly framed together 
groweth into a holy temple in the 
Lord. Ephesians 2:20-21 teaches 
the doctrine and practices of the 
true church, and all along the line 
we must keep with the Apostles and 
Prophets. We should not remove 
the ancient landmarks which our 
fathers have set for us. We love 
to hear God's servants teach and 



preach total depravity; eternal, 
personal and unconditional elec- 
tion; final preservation; and kin- 
dred points of doctrine. Let us 
get close to the subject we have in 
view, and I will endeavor in my 
weakness to offer a few thoughts in 
order to investigate the subject and 
set my mind at ease. 

Now then brethren, we must 
leave off carnal reasons, for the 
world by wisdom carnally knows 
not God. The question concerns 
man. The whole human family, in 
a state of nature, is totally de- 
praved. Now let us come to what 
God said about it. God said, "let 
us make man in our own image, 
after our likeness and let him have 
dominion over the fish in the sea, 
and over all the fowls of the air, 
and over the cattle and all the 
earth and every creeping thing up- 
on the earth. So God created man 
in his own image, in the image of 
God created he him." Gen. 1 :26-27. 

We learn from the same book 
that God gave to man, a law. We 
see by transgressing God's law, 
man fell and became a sinner. So 
in a transgression of the law, the 
head became depraved or corrupt- 
ed. Adam, our federal head, be- 
came corrupted or depraved. Well, 
then, if our first parents became 
corrupted or depraved their pos- 
terity is depraved also. One scrip- 
ture says that beasts and creeping 
things bring forth after their kind. 
The same book says that the herb 



226 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



brings seed after its kind. It then 
follows as a result that if the foun- 
tain head is corrupted, the stream 
is also corrupted. We see in a nat- 
ural stream of water that it will 
not rise above its head. We think 
we have proved that our head, 
Adam, became corrupted or de- 
praved. God drove them (Adam 
and Eve) from the garden, and 
placed a cherubim with a flaming 
sword which turned every way to 
keep the way of the tree of Life. 
Gen. 2:8; Psalms 104:4; Heb. 1:7. 

We see in the last paragraph in 
the last chapter of Genesis that the 
Cherubim and the flaming sword 
were placed there to keep the way 
of the tree of Life, lest he put forth 
his hand and take also of the tree 
of life, and live forever. There 
had been no conception that we 
have any account of before the 
transgression, but after the trans- 
gression the first parents became 
totally corrupted or depraved. Eve 
conceived and brought forth chil- 
dren, so if the fountain be corrupt 
the whole stream of posterity is 
corrupt also. Hear what David 
said: "Behold I was shapen in in- 
iquity, and in sin did my mother 
conceive me." Psalm 51:5; Job. 
14:4. And again David said: "the 
wicked are estranged from thy 
mother's womb, they go astray as 
soon as they be born speaking lies." 
Psalms 58:3. The above embraces 
the whole human family in a state 
of nature, or in an unregenerated 
state. Paul says there is no un- 
derstanding; there is none that 
seeketh after God; they are all gone 
out of the way; there is none that 
doeth good, no, not one. Oh, says 
one, can't they do some good if they 
will? Paul says, "their throats are 



open sepulchres whose mouths are 
full of cursing and bitterness. With 
their tongues they have used deceit; 
the poison of asps is under their 
lips, their feet are swift to shed 
blood arid the way of peace they 
have not known ; there is no fear of 
God before their eyes." One scrip- 
ture says, "Who can bring a clean 
thing out of an unclean thing? Not 
one." 

And again the good book says, 
the natual man receiveth not the 
things of the spirit of God, because 
they are foolish to him, neither can 
he know them, for they are spirit- 
ually discerned. Again Paul says: 
"The carnal mind is enmity against 
God, not subject to his laws neither 
indeed can be." One of the 
prophets says that the tongue is de- 
ceitful above all things, and des- 
perately wicked and who can know 
it? Man in a state of nature is 
totally depraved. Let us see it all 
in wisdom's way and ascertain to a 
certainty the total depravity of man 
in the state of nature. His carnal 
mind is enmity against God, not 
subject to his laws, his mouth is full 
of cursing, his tongue has used de- 
ceit, the poison of asps is under his 
lips, his throat is an open sepulcher, 
his tongue is deceitful above all 
things, and desperately wicked and 
who can know it? His feet are 
swift to shed blood, he has not 
known the way of peace, he has not 
the fear of God before his eyes. One 
scripture says that there is no sound- 
ness in man, he is so contaminated 
with sin that he is full of wounds 
and bruises and putrifying sores 
from the sole of his foot even to the 
crown of his head. Yea, there is 
no soundness in man. Then surely, 
man in the state of nature is totally 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



227 



depraved. There are a great many- 
going about using the language of 
the serpent in substance. "Man is 
not as dead as you might suppose." 
The serpent said to Mother Eve, 
"You shall not surely die." They 
are going about saying that we are 
instrumental in the hands of God to 
regenerate dead sinners. Some say 
that they are not dead, but only 
took the wrong at the years of ac- 
countability. 

David says, "I was shapen in 
iniquity, and in sin did my mother 
conceive me." David was no worse 
than all the rest of the human fam- 
ily in nature. Surely then it clear- 
ly teaches that the fountain at its 
source is corrupt, and that David by 
nature was as much depraved at 
the time of conception, before his 
birth as he was after. Well, says 
one, if man is as dead as you Old 
Baptists say he is, why don't you 
quit preaching, quit doing anything 
good for God will save his people 
anyway? Paul says by Grace are 
ye saved, through faith, and that 
not of yourselves. It is the gift of 
God, not of works, lest any man 
should boast. Well, says one, don't 
the sinner have to repent and be- 
lieve in order to gain eternal life? 
The scriptures teach that eternal 
life must be given to the dead sin- 
ner, and then repentance and faith 
are the fruits of the spirit. Says 
one, is eternal life on condition to 
be performed by the creature? The 
Bible teaches that eternal life is un- 
conditional on the part of the crea- 
ture. 

Now dear brethren farewell. May 
God bless and save his feeble peo- 
ple. 

Elder Anderson McMillon 
Cocke County, Tenn. Sept. 1895. 



The foregoing circular letter was 
written by the great grandfather of 
Elder Walter McMillon who is a son 
of Elder Samuel McMillon. Elder 
Walter McMillon writes that he 
fully endorses the above and we 
publish it at his request. We com- 
mend the article for a careful read- 
ing. 

Yours in hope, 

O. J. Denny. 



LOVE FOR THE TRUTH'S SAKE. 

Dear Elder O. J. Denny: 

I would so much love to see you 
personally and assure you of the 
love I have for you for the truth's 
sake. I would also have loved so 
well to have seen Elder P. G. Lester, 
whom I esteemed a brother indeed, 
and a well tried servant of the cross 
of Christ. And to have assured 
him of the high respect and love I 
had for him before he passed away. 
Brother Denny, it is with much fear 
and with a sense of my own weak- 
ness that I make the attempt to 
write upon the scripture left on 
record in Isaiah 8th chapter and 
15th verse, "And many among 
them shall stumble and fall and be 
weakened and be snared and 
be taken." I am not going to prom- 
ise my readers I will give them the 
true import or meaning of this scrip- 
ture; but in my weak way of under- 
standing will promise, by the help 
of the Lord, to tell what this scrip- 
ture means to me. I can say with 
Elihu to Job, "I also will shew mine 
opinion." Elihu also says, "Great 
men are not always wise." All wis- 
dom of the natural schools has 
never taught or aided one to preach 
one word of gospel or to know or 
understand anything about the way 
of the spirit. Well says one, did not 



228 



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Paul command Timothy to "study 
to shew thyself approved unto God, 
a workman that needeth not to be 
ashamed"? But who gave Timothy 
a mind and will to do this studying? 
Timothy manifested or worked out 
what God worked in, therefore, 
manifested the fruits of the rich in- 
dwelling of the holy spirit of God. 
Jesus himself says, "I thank thee O 
Father, Lord of heaven and earth, 
because thou hast hid these things 
from the wise and prudent and hast 
revealed them unto babes." Then 
do we see any room here for im- 
provement by the wisdom of this 
world? The wisdom of this world 
will only serve to tickle the ear and 
please the natural man. Paul 
don't say give this command to 
Timothy ; but covers the whole mat- 
ter by saying "I neither received it 
of man neither was I taught it but 
by the revelation of Jesus Christ." 
Then outside of this revelation, 
which is not of man, my writing 
and preaching does my brethren, in 
the spirit, no good. I am a full be- 
liever in a natural education and 
would be glad if I and others had 
more of it; but let us not mix these 
natural things with the work and 
power of God. It must be through 
and by the spirit, which the wis- 
dom of the schools can't learn or 
know anything about. 

The scripture under considera- 
tion was spoken of and concerning 
Jerusalem and her inhabitants. 
God's own chosen people. I want 
to say here by way of introductory 
to what I may say in this article, it 
is nothing more nor less than in ac- 
cordance with the articles of faith 
of Primitive or Old School Baptists ; 
that reads as follows, "That all the 
elect of God were chosen in Jesus 



Christ before the foundation of the 
world." As things now present 
themselves to me, I mean ; this faith 
and doctrine to be the base of what 
I may write here; feeling that if 
one wants to be called a Primitive 
Baptist he should advocate their 
faith and doctrine. To bend or 
twist the truth, or our articles of 
faith, because these things don't 
suit some others, is, of itself, an er- 
ror and breeds, after its kind. Sound 
Primitive Baptists can't afford 
peace at any cost. Peace is beau- 
tiful, when in the bonds of love and 
truth and is that by which God is 
glorified and Zion honored. Many 
in Israel stumbled at the command 
of God in the wilderness and fell 
and were snared and they brought 
up an evil report at the good land 
of Canaan. Christ came unto his 
own and they received him not. 
Many went back and followed 
Christ no more. Paul said, "For 
they stumbled at that stumbling 
stone, "As it is written, Behold I lay 
in Zion a stumbling stone and rock 
of offense." Therefore many were 
taken and snared and as the poet 
said, "Many to final destruction 
shall run." There has ever been 
war between the true church and 
the false; but when the war and 
confusion gets into the house, 
among our own people, then we 
have trouble as it is with us today. 
We might say the truth is at peace 
with itself and error or false doc- 
trine is at peace with itself. There- 
fore, the war is between error and 
truth. When the true church be- 
gins to be disobedient and forsakes 
the true old articles of faith and 
doctrine once delivered to the saints 
for the applause of men and to 
spare the big man in his departure, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



229 



or error.lt is then, we begin to hear 
the bleating of the sheep and the 
lowing of the oxen is heard. This 
is the sign of a goodly Babylonish 
garment, somewhere in the house. 
This house becomes divided and 
can't stand before the enemy; but 
must be consumed. Then comes 
the falling away and snaring and 
confusion and to be taken, as it is 
today with us. I am aware of the 
fact; this is a day of much con- 
fusion and stumbling in the camps 
of spiritual Israel, and as we see it, 
there is a cause for it all. Let us 
try, by asking the wisdom of God, 
to enable us to look close with the 
searchlight of divine truth, to see 
if we cannot find the cause. Christ 
said "Many false prophets shall 
arise and shall deceive many." 
Also of your own selves shall men 
arise, speaking perverse things to 
draw away disciples after them." 
So, we say, that gets the confusion 
and stumbling, in the house, among 
God's people. It seems to me 
there is one main cause of the pres- 
sent trouble among us. A stumb- 
ling and falling away from the old 
ancient Landmark, and faith of the 
dear immaculate Lamb of God, 
and the Prophets and Apostles. 
And that is the Doctrine of salva- 
tion by grace for poor lost sinners 
and the faith of the eternal vital 
unity in the life sense of God's peo- 
ple; who were chosen in Christ, 
their head, from all eternity. I 
hope I am not a fault finder among 
my brethren or want to force all 
to preach and write in my own pre- 
scribed way. If one thinks he has 
received such, by revelation, and 
it is not as I see it, it is his and not 
mine and I can give him a friendly 
farewell and let him tell it, in his 



own way, and manner; knowing I 
am not responsible for the other 
watchman's alarm. It is my duty 
I am concerned about. Knowing 
"if the trumpet give an uncertain 
sound" Israel can't prepare herself 
for the battle. If my brother 
won't fall out with me, because I 
cannot see as far as he can, or see 
through his glasses, I will not fall 
out with him, because he can see 
farther than I can, or require him 
to see through my glasses. Not 
that I would preach or write what 
I believe to be the truth and then 
apologize for it, to get the fancy 
notions of man to receive it. I 
know some good brethren think 
ihey don't believe what the term 
"eternal vital unity" implies, there- 
fore, I don't wish to offend or 
speak harshly. Webster defines 
vital to be pertaining to life. Then: 
where do we find this eternal life 
but in the Father? Therefore, 
given in the Son, the head of the 
church, of which Jesus says, "1 
give unto them eternal life." He 
owns them, by saying "I am the 
good shepherd and know my sheep 
and am known of mine." Then, 
this eternal life is the child that 
was with the father. Then, let us 
see about the unity between God 
and his people. One definition of 
unity is "the state of being one." 
Then this unity is in the head and 
took place in eternity before the 
morning of time. So we, dear 
child of God who may not fully 
understand me, may say the term 
eternal vital union is not a Bible 
word. It may not be just verbatim 
in words, but no Bible read per- 
son will say its equivalent is not in 
the scriptures from Genesis to 
Revelations. Therefore the doc- 



230 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



trine of eternal vital union is not 
an ism or a tradition, but it is in ac- 
cordance with the scriptures of 
eternal truth, and advocated by- 
Primitive Baptists in all ages of the 
world. One of the Apostles says, 
God is love, then there must have 
been an object or something to love. 
Tell me how old love is and I will 
tell how old God's people are. 
Jude says, "To them that are sanc- 
tified by God the Father and pre- 
served in Jesus Christ." This looks 
like eternal vital unity with the 
head. It seems there must have 
been something to be preserved be- 
fore it could be preserved. These 
preserved never have or will be lost 
because they (the church) are in 
Christ her head a safe place. In 
Proverbs it is said, "Before the 
mountains were settled, before the 
hills were I brought forth. While as 
yet he had not made the earth." 
Here is the developing or bringing 
forth of the whole generation of 
Jesus Christ and that before the 
morning of time. That is going 
back about far enough isn't it. 
David explained these chosen peo- 
ple in the life sense saying "Thine 
eyes did see my substance, yet being 
imperfect and in the book all my 
members were written which in 
continuance were fashioned when 
as yet there was none of them. Here 
we have the whole chosen family of 
God in an unmanifested or life 
sense in her head. But not in a 
manifested sense as they were to be 
in Adam. If in the Lamb's book, 
all God's members were written; 
then there must have been a one- 
ness in Christ her head. Paul says, 
"Blessed be the God and Father of 
our Lord Jesus Christ who hath 
blessed us with all spiritual bless- 



ings in heavenly places in Christ, 
according as he hath chosen us in 
him before the foundation of the 
world." Are we going to believe 
what Paul says about it. What has 
man, with the wisdom of this world, 
got to say about it? As for me, I 
will take what the eminent apostle 
Paul says about this matter. It has 
been said this eternal unity with 
Christ and his people makes every 
one of them a god. It is very 
strange indeed that any one could 
conceive such an idea. Words have 
meaning and we must respect them 
as such. Because the feet and 
hands are of the body, therefore 
members of the one body, does it 
make the hands and feet the head 
or does the hand or foot, because it 
is of the body presume to be the 
head or lead or direct for the 
body. Or did we ever see a head 
without a body? If the head 
(which is love) existed in eternity, 
the body must also have existed. 
Christ says, I am the head. Then 
which is the oldest, the body or 
head? If we admit Adam and Eve 
is figurative of Christ and his bride, 
with all their progeny, without any 
dissecting, it seems then all of the 
progeny would be God's people and 
be a universal atonement for all of 
Adam's race (which I don't believe) 
in place of a particular or special 
atonement for the chosen of God. 
Or if we say they must be born 
again and there is nothing eternal 
about this natural progeny of Adam 
before the manifestation of this new 
birth, then : no one of this progeny 
of Adam could either go to heaven 
or to hell; but those who had this 
manifestation of the new birth, 
seems to me there would never be 
any that would go to hell. Because 
if there is nothing eternal about the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



231 



aforenamed progeny; but Adam 
multiplied or the natural man, they 
would perish with all created or 
natural things and be no more. But 
nay, I have not so learned it by the 
teaching of the scriptures. And 
thanks eternal it is said "We have 
a more sure word of prophecy 
whereunto we should take heed." I 
love it as expressed in the following 
scriptures, Job 10 :11 ; 2nd Cor. 1 :4; 
2nd Peter 1:13-14; Luke 1:41; 
Psalms 22:10; Psalms 139:13; 
Phil. 1:24; and Col. 2:8, 9, 10. I do 
not believe in a resurrection of a 
lot of spirits; but I do believe in the 
resurrection of the bodies of God's 
chosen people. I do not believe 
here, in a manifested state in Adam. 
God's people in eternity or in an 
unmanifested state, ever existed in 
flesh, blood and bones as they do, 
but, that eternal life that is with 
the Father is the child. Therefore it 
had eternal standing in Christ and 
a time standing in Adam. It is not 
in the advocating of the truth or 
this old ancient doctrine and faith 
of the old fathers in Israel that is 
and has caused confusion and 
stumbling; but, it is in the forsaking 
or departure from it. It was not 
Elijah that troubled Israel, but 
Elijah says to Ahab, "I have not 
troubled Israel; but thou and thy 
father's house, in that ye have for- 
saken the commandments of the 
Lord and thou hast followed 
Baalim." 

Paul says in speaking of Christ, 
"He becomes the author of eternal 
salvation." Who would think, for 
a moment, of a time when there 
would be eternal salvation and no 
recipient of this salvation ; or would 
there be an eternal God of love and 
I no recipient of that love? "Let us 



stand firm upon the doctrine of 
Christ and the apostles. This old 
doctrine has stood the test of time 
against the assaults made on it by 
learned theologians of the day; 
and has been faithfully advocated 
by such God called and God sent 
servants as Elders W. M. Goadsby 
of England and Elder Gilbert Beebe 
of the United States, and many 
others. The good old poets, Watts, 
Hart, Kent, Cooper, Newton and 
many others sang and wrote of this 
doctrine. I love it as written by 
one of these poets, 

"In union with the Lamb, 
From condemnation free, 
The saints from everlasting were, 
And shall forever be." 

I truly hope no one, for fear of 
becoming unpopular or impractical 
will try to get around these eviden- 
ces of eternal love and union be- 
tween God and his people. This 
doctrine and faith is so elucidated 
through the old and new Testament 
scriptures we cannot afford to 
doubt this choice being made in 
eternity in the life sense and mani- 
fested to the heirs of God in time. 
This has been the dividing ground 
between the children of light and 
darkness in all ages. It was once 
said of this faith and doctrine it 
was "a hard saying who can hear 
it." And they went back and fol- 
lowed him no more. Here was the 
"stumbling." And the modern 
stumblers are yet stumbling at 
Christ, the chief corner stone, and 
are today just as far from owning 
Christ and the apostles doctrine as 
they were when Christ was here. 
The natural man wants to be popu- 
lar and like other nations working 



232 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



a little of man's power, into the di- 
vine arrangements of God, to suit 
the fancy notions of the carnal 
mind. I can't say more than Paul 
says "For ye see your calling 
brethren, how that not many wise 
men after the flesh, not many 
mighty, not many noble are called." 
It was this doctrine of eternal vital 
unity and salvation by grace that 
was the dividing grounds between 
Novation and Cornelius in the year 
of 251. We see Cornelius was in 
full sympathy with the growing 
tendency toward a lax discipline 
and corruption in the church and 
was, consequently, opposed by No- 
vation and a number of his 
brethren. Accordingly, Novation 
and those in favor of his ideas, re- 
garding the practice of the church, 
withdrew and formed themselves 
into a church maintaining no fellow- 
ship with the Catholic party, as 
they were beginning to style them- 
selves. So we plainly see in all the 
divisions from this early date of 251 
all the stumbling and falling and 
snaring has been and is going off, 
kicking over this doctrine of salva- 
tion by grace and rights and titles 
of the true church. 

In 1832, at which time a division 
took place between the old school 
and the new school Baptists, the 
new school Baptists went off stumb- 
ling as did Cornelius' party in 251 
over this same doctrine of salvation 
by grace and eternal vital unity be- 
tween Christ and his people, it being 
the same stumbling stone they have 
in all ages stumbled over. Thus 
preferring numbers and popular 
ideas of men, rather than the 
teachings of the scripture. 

When we shun to declare the 
whole council of God and call it a 



hard saying and ought not to be al- 
lowed to be preached; thus con- 
demning free speech and the plain 
teaching of the scripture, then 
comes wars and confusion as it is 
today with us. Let us never fear 
we will lose out by contending ear- 
nestly for the true faith. We know, 
of a fact it has been and forever 
will be spoken against. Let us take 
courage looking to Jesus, who has 
said "look unto me." And let the 
world vent her spite. And let us 
ever be found on the watch tower 
contending for the true faith of 
Christ and his apostles. The 
preacher never should think the 
church of God belongs to him; but 
the preacher belongs to the church. 
And sometimes we see articles 
rather tainted with strife and abuse, 
therefore, with a wrong spirit. If 
we should think our brother to be in 
an error, or carnal, we should, 
once, stop and examine ourselves to 
see whether we are in the true 
spirit or not. It appears when the 
grace of God is shining brightly in 
one's face it brings him to view his 
own unworthiness and to a state of 
humbleness and to his brethren's 
feet. It is the big children that 
give big trouble. I never thought 
it fit to allow controversy in our 
papers, or too much fault finding 
over frivolous matters and abuse 
among brethren. If we all would 
tell our hurts and grievance, per- 
sonally, to one another, in place of 
publishing them or getting in the 
pulpit and exposing one another, 
thus confusing the churches, I feel 
we would have more peace in our 
churches and would see better days. 
If my brother personally comes and 
tells me where I have departed from 
the truth and to my hurt and to the 
cause, it says to me, he is my very 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



233 



best friend, both a friend to me and 
to the cause. It goes without say- 
ing that it draws me closer to him ; 
but to go at this matter in a public, 
rough way drives a brother farther 
away and makes an enemy out of 
him and it simply adds fuel to the 
fire. I often use my own views and 
construction on passages of scrip- 
ture, but with no intention of con- 
troversy or abuse. Therefore, 
when we mourn over these things 
we should try, as much as in us is, 
to learn obedience by the things we 
suffer. Experience is a wonderful 
school, when taught by grace. Some 
deny the resurrection of the bodies 
of the children of God, but I have 
not so learned it by the teachings of 
the scripture. I have thought the 
bodies of the children of God are 
consummated in the resurrection. 
While the unjust shall "awake to 
shame and everlasting contempt." 
But to God's people it is said "We 
look for the Saviour, the Lord Jesus 
Christ, who shall change our vile 
body, that it may be fashioned like 
unto his glorious body." This is m; 
hope when I cease suffering here. 

Many of the dear people of God 
I will never see in this life; but I 
have a hope of meeting them all in 
that great beyond, where parting 
and sorrow is no more, and in a 
glorious immortality. I have re- 
ceived many letters from the breth- 
ren in different parts that are a 
great source of comfort to me in my 
old declining days. I would love 
to write to them personally ; I want 
all to know who have so generously 
written to me that their good letters 
are highly regarded. 

Your brother I hope in bonds of 
love, 

Elder W. L. Edwards, 
Castlewood, Va. 



SAVED BY GRACE 

And Jesus answered and said un- 
to him (Peter) Blessed art thou 
Simon Bar-jona for flesh and blood 
hath not revealed it unto thee, but 
my Father which is in heaven. And 
I say also unto thee that thou art 
Peter and upon this rock I will 
build my church and the gates of 
hell shall not prevail against it. 
Matthew 16:17-18. 

These are the blessed words of 
Jesus to Peter. Jesus did build His 
church without the aid or advice of 
man. This church is the pillar and 
ground of the truth. This church 
was not built by our Lord to save 
sinners but for a home for sinners 
that are saved. And all those that 
are everlastingly saved by grace 
will be given an eye of faith to see 
this blessed old church, and when 
the love of God is shed abroad in 
their hearts by the Holy Ghost 
which is given unto them they will 
love the church and desire a home. 
And O what a blessed home it is to 
a poor lost, ruined and miserable 
sinner. 

There is much rest and peace 
found in the fellowship of the 
church. It is not on the outside 
and no one need look for it 
there. It is found in the church, 
which is the body of Christ for He 
(Christ) is head over all things to 
the church which is His body. I 
hope I am thankful this day that I 
was given to see the blessed old 
church at the Falls of Tar River 
over thirty years ago and when it 
pleased God to shed abroad His 
love in my heart then I loved the 
church and when I was made will- 
ing to come home to my friends I 
tried to tell them how great things 
the Lord had done for me, but be- 
fore I was through talking one of 



234 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



the old deacons rose on his feet and 
with tears in his eyes and said, 
brethren I'm satisfied, I move he be 
received. It met with a second 
and the pastor (Eld. Gold) put the 
question and I was given a welcome 
home with the dear people of God 
that were so dear to me then and 
are yet very dear to me. 

And while the greater part of the 
membership then has passed away, 
the Lord has given us others that are 
just as dear to me and I love just 
as good as I loved the members 
then. 

At the time I united with the 
church I found them all in peace 
and ate the bread and drank the 
wine with them the day I was bap- 
tized, the second Sunday in June 
1897, a day long to be remembered 
by me. And I am proud to say 
that we are all in peace now and 
have been for many years. And 
while there has been and may be 
now, much confusion among breth- 
ren in different sections it is a 
great comfort to me to know there 
are a few churches in this section 
that are in peace and are blessed 
with good deacons and pastors. 

It is a good life to live in peace 
and to let brotherly love continue. 
I have found during these thirty- 
three years as a member of the 
church that their love and fellow- 
ship for me is worth more than all 
this world. I think I can see how 
well they could get along without 
me, but how could I get alng with- 
out them? 

And for the peace and love they 
manifest to me it makes it just as 
sweet a home for me now as it was 
when I was first received. 

I found four able and well quali- 
fied deacons in the church. All of 
them have long since departed to 



be with Christ which is far better, 
but God is still blessing us for we 
have four now who in my judgment 
are qualified and are filling the of- 
fice well. 

The church was at that time 
blessed with a sound, able, and very 
faithful and much beloved pastor 
in the person of Eld. P. D. Gold. He 
is also gone to be with Christ. The 
doctrine which he preached was 
food to the soul for both sheep and 
lambs and confusing to none, and 
made him a great gift to the 
church. And while the church 
called me as their pastor at the next 
meeting after his death, I have 
never felt nor do I now feel that 
I could take his place. However I 
want to and believe I am preaching 
the same doctrine that he preached 
though not so ably as he did, but so 
far has not appeared to confuse 
the brethren. 

I want to continue to preach the 
doctrine of salvation by grace, to 
preach the word, to admonish my 
brethren to live in peace, to tell 
them that the grace of God has 
taught them to live soberly and 
righteously and Godly in this world. 

To love one another, to pray for 
one another, and to bear each 
other's burdens and so fulfill the 
law of Christ. Behold how good 
and how pleasant it is for brethren 
to dwell together in unity. Jesus 
said, As the Father hath loved me, 
so have I loved you. Continue ye 
in my love. 

Now I want to admonish the dear 
people of God everywhere who 
may read this, to live in peace, to 
follow God as dear children and 
walk in love. And when you follow 
God, and walk in love you certainly 
are not following the world, neither 
are you walking in confusion. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



235 



The same peace and love that I 
found in the church and the same 
doctrine that was preached then, 
the same rules of decorum, and the 
same discipline. All these things I 
want to leave in the church. And 
when the time comes when I hope 
I can say, for I am now ready to be 
offered, I have fought a good fight, 
I have kept the faith, I've finished 
my course. Henceforth there is 
laid up for me a crown of right- 
eousness which the righteous judge 
shall give me at that day and not to 
me only but to all them that love 
His appearing, for when we shall 
see Him we shall be like Him for 
we shall see Him as He is. Blessed 
hope. 

A. B. DENSON, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



PRESENT YOUR BODIES A 
LIVING SACRIFICE. 

(Romans XII :1 and 2) 
Let us first notice by what Paul 
exhorts the brethren to good works. 
He does not present them with pic- 
tures of paradise nor does he dwell 
on the horrors of hell. It is not by 
promised blessings which they will 
receive nor does he hold up before 
them the curse that fell upon Adam. 
It is by the MERCIES OF GOD. Not 
by things which may be given to 
them in the future. No, it is by 
what has been freely bestowed up- 
on them. And just what are these 
mercies of God which the Apostle 
calls to mind? 

It was solely by the mercy of God 
that they were ever embraced in 
the Covenant, whereby God gave 
Christ these very people and 
whereby Christ covenanted to re- 
deem them from their sins (John 
VI:37). Before ever we came into 



this world, God foresaw our ruined 
condition, knew what we would be 
and provided for our redemption. 
Not because of our righteousness, 
or obedience, or prayers, no none 
of these things contributed in the 
slightest to our being embraced in 
that covenant, but simply because 
of God's Election (choice) and the 
love of Jesus our names were writ- 
ten in the Lamb's Book of Life. 
(Romans XI:ll-33.) 

And then what a Mercy of God 
that in due time we, who were dead 
in trespasses and sins should be 
quickened. (Eph. II-l.) We, who 
were in darkness, children of wrath 
even as others, what a mercy that 
we should be delivered from the 
pit. Let us remember, — "He 
brought me up also out of an hor- 
rible pit, out of the miry clay, and 
set my feet upon a rock, and estab- 
lished my goings." (Psalm XL:2). 
This was the work of God, and as 
it was wholly undeserved and un- 
earned on our part, it was by the 
MERCY OF GOD. 

And it is not only by His Mercy 
that we have Spiritual life, but also 
that it is kept alive from day to day ; 
that we are given the spiritual 
manna for that life to feed upon; 
and that we are led oftimes into 
green pastures and beside the still 
waters. What a mercy that we 
can and discern spiritual things and 
can hear and understand the soft 
sweet music of the Gospel calling 
us to rest from our labors. 

Again, what a mercy of God that 
the candle stick has not long ago 
been removed from our midst. 
When we look upon the past and 
realize our unfaithfulness to the 
Church and our failure to "Love 
one another" surely we are made to 



236 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



wonder why God has been mindful 
of us at all. 

And so Paul touches the memory 
of the child of God and says look 
back and behold the Mercies of God 
which have been manifested to you 
and by these I beseech you to pre- 
sent your bodies a living sacrifice. 
What greater reason could he put 
forth than this. 

Brethren is there something for 
the Child of God to do in this life? 
There surely is. Present your bod- 
ies a Living sacrifice. An active 
one, not a dead one. One that is 
alive, sensitive and active in the 
service of God. Remember it is a 
Living sacrifice God requires, not a 
dead one. This is not to be a sacri- 
fice for our sins. Jesus is the only 
sacrifice that ever put away sin. 
"Without the shedding of blood 
there is no remission of sin." But 
our sins having been put away by 
the one offering which was made 
on Calvary, and the MAN having 
been born again, and freely given 
eternal life by Jesus (John X:28) 
it becomes our duty and privilege 
to offer our bodies a living sacrifice. 
How is this to be done? By being 
not conformed to this world, Paul 
says in the second verse, and then 
follow the different things that go 
to make our bodies a living sacri- 
fice. It is not always easy to pre- 
fer one another. It is not easy to 
at all times abhor that which is evil 
and cleave to that which is good. 
Paul says in another place, "For 
the good that I would I do not: but 
the evil which I would not, that I 
do." Romans VII :19). And then in 
the 24th verse: "O wretched man 
that I am! who shall deliver me 
from the body of this death." It is 
a sacrifice, yes, a living sacrifice 



for there is a continual warfare in- 
side the child of God. To avenge 
not himself, to give place to wrath, 
to feed a hungering enemy, to 
recompense no man evil for evil 
means to crucify the flesh, and that 
is a sacrifice, yes, a Living sacri- 
fice. 

May the Lord turn our eyes upon 
all His goodness and mercy to us, 
and then may He move our hearts 
to present those unworthy bodies of 
ours a living sacrifice, holy (not 
wholly but HOLY) acceptable unto 
God, which is our reasonable ser- 
vice. 

Morte H. Craig. 

St. Joseph, Mo. 



AN APPRECIATION. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend: 

I am so nervous I can hardly 
write to do any good. I have to 
get some one to write for me when I 
can, consequently I have neglected 
writing too long. I want to return 
my heartfelt thanks to the many 
brethren, sisters and friends that 
visited me while in the hospital, 
and also while I have been here 
with my brother, T. A. Jones, and 
also for the many good letters and 
cards I have received from them. I 
certainly do appreciate them. I 
would be glad to visit them and 
write to them too, if I could. I 
hope you all will excuse me as I 
am quite feeble, though I am up 
most of the time. 

I have not been to church very 
much for months, so I get very sad 
and blue at times. Please write to 
me again if you feel like it and come 
to see me if you can. 

Yours, in a sweet hope of heaven 
J. R .JONES. 

Rockford, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



237 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Eider S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIII. No. 15 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, JUNE 15, 1930 



WHAT OF THE INCREASE? 
TO WHOM SHALL WE LOOK? 

Amongst our people and those in 
sympathy with us, as well as among 
those who are not in sympathy with 
the Primitive or Old School Bap- 
tists, there have been and are many 
who freely predict a falling off in 
numbers until the old church will 
cease to exist as a visible Church on 
earth. 

The Kingdom of God, unlike the 
kingdoms of earth, has never been 
enumerated, nor has its bounds been 
charted on any map, since it is an 
invisible Kingdom and cometh 
without observation. 

This being true, what do we know 
about the size, the numbers or 
greatness or smallness of the num- 
bers, who are the chosen of God, 
and separated from the world, being 



circumcised in heart; though they 
may be unknown to any organized 
Church on earth. 

The devoted, recognized, follow- 
ers of Christ in His day and in all 
ages have been few in number com- 
pared to the multitude. 

Notwithstanding numbers, if one 
is all alone, saved with Christ and in 
Christ, then they are more wonder- 
fully accompanied and sustained 
than they would be with all the 
world about them without Christ. 

When we attempt to popularize 
the worship of God by adopting the 
doctrines and commandments of 
men, by adding to or taking from 
the plain simple yet glorious truths 
of the Bible in order to attract large 
numbers and please the multitude, 
we may gain in numbers, and be 
considered great in the eyes of the 
world; but a million Christless 
church members are not worth an 
iota to the true worship of God. 

"I am the vine, ye are the branch- 
es, My Father is the husbandman." 
This language of the Lord shows 
the life connection between the liv- 
ing head, God the Father, the liv- 
ing vine, Christ the Lord and the 
living members or branches, the 
Church of God. 

The branch is the outgrowth of 
the vine and has no life outside of 
the vine, thus we are shown how it 
is that we are in Christ, and all our 
righteousness is of Him saith the 
Lord. 

Paul said, "I have planted, Apol- 
lus watered; but God gave the in- 
crease. So neither is he that plant- 
eth anything, neither he that water- 
eth; but God that giveth the in- 
crease. 1st Cor. 3:6-7. 

If Paul and Apollos could not in- 
crease the numbers; but had to 
wait on God and Christ the Lord, 



238 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



may we not wait with patience, re- 
membering that known unto God 
are all His works from the begin- 
ning and that He will not forsake 
His own. 

Paul shows all are one in Christ 
the head in the following: 

"Let no man beguile you of your 
reward, in a voluntary humility and 
worshipping of Angels, intruding in- 
to things which he hath not seen, 
vainly puffed up by his fleshly 
mind, and not holding the Head, 
(Christ) from which all the body 
by joints and bands having nourish- 
ment ministered, and knit together, 
increaseth with the increase of God, 
wherefore if ye be dead with Christ 
from the rudiments of the world, 
why, as though living in the world, 
are ye subject to ordinances?" 
"Touch not, taste not, handle not, 
which all are to perish with the 
using ; after the doctrines and com- 
mandments of men." Col. 2:18-23. 

The true Church of God is here 
shown to be dead with Christ to the 
rudiments of the world, therefore 
there is no life for them in the 
worldly formalities of religious wor- 
ship. 

How much greater their reward 
in being knit together with Christ in 
God and thus they are alive unto 
God through Christ the living head, 
therefore, their increase is with the 
increase of God. 

In our vanity, and with the flesh- 
ly mind we look for outward mani- 
festations of an increase in the 
Kingdom ; but we must wait on the 
Lord for the spiritual manifesta- 
tions of His .Kingdom, for we read. 
"Christ who is from the beginning, 
the first born from the dead, that 
in all things He might have the pre- 
eminence, For it pleased God that 
in him (in Christ) all fulness dwell ; 



and having made peace through the 
blood of the cross, in the body of 
His flesh, through death, to present 
you holy and unblameable in His 
sight: As ye therefore received 
Christ Jesus the Lord so walk ye in 
Him; For in Him dwelleth all the 
fulness of the Godhead bodily, and 
ye are complete in Him." Col. 1st. 
and 2nd chapters. 

To the Church at Philippi, Paul 
said, Let your moderation be known 
to all men. The Lord is at hand, 
My God shall supply all your need, 
(not all your wants or wishes) but 
"shall supply all you need accord- 
ing to His riches in glory by Christ 
Jesus." 

Since it is clearly shown that the 
increase is of God, what remains 
for the people of God to do? Paul 
said to Timothy, study to show thy- 
self a workman rightly dividing the 
word of truth, giving to each his 
portion." If we study the scrip- 
tures we find many salutations, ad- 
monitions and exhortations to the 
children of God and we should re- 
spect the different gifts for all are 
to profit with all. 

To the Philippians Paul said, 
"Finally brethren, whatsoever 
things are just, pure, lovely, and of 
good report; if there be any virtue, 
and if there be any praise, think on 
these things. Phil. 4th Ch. 

What shall we do? Earnestly try 
to do as the apostle admonished his 
brethren to do, remembering that 
we cannot lengthen the cords nor 
strengthen the stakes of Zion, ex- 
cept as the Lord directs and bring- 
eth the increase. 

The Prophet Isaiah, considering 
the Gentiles, said, "Sing O barren, 
thou didst not bear; break forth 
into singing; and cry aloud, enlarge 
the place of thy tent, and let them 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



239 



stretch forth the curtains of thy 
habitation; spare not, lengthen thy 
cords and strengthen thy stakes, for 
thou shalt break forth on the right 
hand and on the left; and thy seed 
shall inherit the gentiles and make 
the desolate cities to be inhabited." 
Isaiah 54:1-3. 

The call of the Prophet to the 
needy, was, "Ho every one that 
thirsteth, come ye to the waters, 
and he that hath no money; come 
ye, buy and eat; yea come buy wine 
and milk without money and with- 
out price." 

To this people, poor in spirit; but 
rich in faith the prophet said, "No 
weapon that is formed against thee 
shall prosper; and every tongue 
that shall rise against thee in judg- 
ment thou shalt condemn; This is 
the heritage of the servants of the 
Lord, and their righteousness is of 
me saith the Lord." Isaiah 54:17. 

All boasting is excluded. Our 
salvation is of the Lord. The best 
that we can do is to wait upon the 
Lord for spiritual favor and earn- 
estly endeavor to lay aside every 
weight and the sin that doth so 
easily beset us, ever looking unto 
God and to Christ for. every help in 
time of need. 

Yours in hope, 
O. J. DENNY. 



A GOOD MEETING 

My Dear Mr. Gold : 

The Spring Session of the Bear 
Creek Association closed yesterday. 
This meeting was held at Deese 
Chapel Church in North Wadesboro 
N. C, was well attended and peace 
and harmony prevailed and our peo- 
ple comforted and edified and built 
up in the Christian faith. Besides 
our home ministers we had with 



us Elders D. A. Obriant and G. W. 
Hill of Greensboro, and Elders H. S. 
Williams and D. P. Broadway and 
brother A. F. Nance from Abbott's 
Creek Association, all preaching the 
pure gospel of the Son of God. 
There were two members received 
by experience. Praise the Lord for 
such a meeting. 

J. W. JONES. 



READING LANDMARK SINCE 
A CHILD. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend: 

Enclosed you will find check for 
two dollars to pay my subscription 
on the Landmark another year. I 
enjoy reading it. I have been read- 
ing it ever since I was a child. Now 
I am sixty nine. 

May the Lord bless you in your 
work in the future, as I feel he has 
in the past. 

I will close, 

Your little sister, 

KATE HOOPER. 

Ruffin, N. C. 



LOST HIS DEAR COMPANION 

A letter from our sainted friend, Elder 
N. H. Harrison, of Pinetown, N. C, states 
that he has lost his devoted wife, who has 
been his comfort from early manhood, 
and I am sure the hearts of every one who 
has heard him preach and learned to love 
him will go out to him in his deep be- 
reavement. 

For more than a half century Elder 
Harrison has been serving the Lord, and 
for his years he is truly a remarkable man. 
May the God of all mercies, who has kept 
him thus far ever abide with him and 
sustain and support him in his declining 
years, and fill his aching heart with the 
peace that only the Saviour can give, "For 
my peace I leave with thee, my peace I 
give unto thee, not as the world giveth, 
give I unto thee." 

JOHN D. GOLD. 



240 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



TO ADD TO OUR INDIGENT FUND 
We desire to return thanks to Brother 
D. L. House, Greenville, N. C, for a gift of 
$2.00 to add to our fund to send the Land- 
mark to those who are unable to pay. We 
deeply appreciate this. We have a num- 
ber of widows and very old people who 
write they desire the Landmark but are 
unable to pay for it. We match every 
dollar that is sent in with one of ours, 
and so in that way the price to the sub- 
scriber from this fund is only one dollar 
per year. However we desire it under- 
stood that we cannot send the 
paper for one dollar, as the price of 
$2.00 allows very little profit, if every 
one paid for the paper. If each sub- 
scriber would send us a new one, and 
thus aid in increasing the circulation of 
the paper the increased volume of busi- 
nes would enable us to make some profit 
on the publication. — J. D. Gold. 

RESOLUTION OF REISDVTLLE CHURCH 
In Memory of Elder L. H. Hardy 
Whereas God has removed from time 
our former esteemed member, and Pastor 
for many years, Elder L. H. Hardy, Be it 
resolved that we extend to his family and 
friends our sincere sympathy. 

In the death of Elder Hardy, his wife 
lost a faithful and devoted husband, his 
children a kind and loving father, his 
church and people an able and active min- 
ister and his community a good and use- 
ful citizen. 

Resolved that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be filed with our Church Records 
and that a copy be given to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication. 

Approved by the Church in conference, 
this May the 18th., 1930. 

O. J. Denny, Moderator. 
E. R. Harris, Clerk, 
Mrs. Kate Dameron Mitchell, 
Assistant Clerk. 



LINVTLLE UNION 

The next session of the Linville Union is 
appointed to be held with the church at 
Suggs Creek, Montgomery Co., North 
Carolina, on Saturday and Fifth Sunday in 
June 1930. 

We invite, brethren, sisters and friends 
to meet with us. A special invitation is 
extended to our ministers. 

W. L. TEAGUE. 



LOWER COUNTRY LINE ASSOCIATION 

The next session of the Lower Country 
Line Association will be held at Roxboro, 
N. C, on July 19th, 20th, and 21st, 1930 
in the High School Building about % 
mile west of the Court House on Highway 
No. 144. Plenty of nice camping ground. 
All lovers of truth that are in peace and 
order at home are invited to be with us. 

F. D. LONG, Church Clerk. 



THE SKEWARKEY UNION 

The next session of the Skewarkey Union 
is to be held with Williams Meeting House 
Edgecombe County, eleven miles north of 
Tarboro on Friday, Saturday and Fifth 
Sunday in June. There is a hard surface 
road to within four miles of the church. 
All persons coming by rail will please 
notify C. H. Spivey and he will meet them 
at Tarboro. 

C. H. SPIVEY, Church Clerk. 
Tarboro, N. C. 



STAUNTON RIVER UNION 

Please publish in the next issue (June 
15th.) of your paper, that the next session 
of the Staunton River Union Meeting, will 
be held with the Danville Primitive Bap- 
tist Church, Danville, Virginia (5th Sun- 
day and Saturday in June 1930.) 

An invitation to attend is extended to 
all lovers of the Gospel Truth. 

Yours very truly, 
W. L. HORSLEY, Church Clerk. 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE UNION. 

The next session of the Upper Country 
Line Union will be held, the Lord willing, 
with the church at Monticello, Guilford 
County, N. C, on the fifth Sunday and 
Saturday before in June, 1930. 

Eld. B. F. McKinney was chosen to 
preach the introductory sermon with the 
writer as alternate. 

The public is cordially invited to attend 
especially ministers. 

W. C. King, Union Clerk. 



LOWER COUNTRY LINE ASSOCIATION 

The next session of the Lower Country 
Line Primitive Baptist Association, will 
convene with the Church at Roxboro, in 
Person County, N. C, on Saturday before 
third Sunday in July, 1930 and continue 
three days. A cordial invitation is extend- 
ed to our brethren and friends, who are 
in fellowship with us, and have no desire 
to depart from the "ancient landmarks 
which our Fathers have set." Those com- 
ing by railroad from Virginia, will be met 
Saturday morning on arrival, and taken 
to place of meeting. 

J. H. GOOCH, Association Clerk 
Stem, N. C. 



EASTERN LITTLE RIVER UNION 

The Eastlern Little River Union will be 
held with Hancock's Creek church, John- 
ston County, N. C, on Saturday and 5th 
Sunday in June 1930. Elder E. F. Pearce 
is appointed to preach the introductory 
sermon, and Elder T. F. Adams his alter- 
nate. Brethren, sisters, friends and min- 
isters especially are cordially invited to 
attend. It's on No. 22 highway, 3 miles 
northeast of Benson, N. C. 

JOSEPH A. BATTEN, 

Union Clerk. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT - — ■ - -" - - ■'. - 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII. JULY 1, 1930 No. 16 



GOD SUSTAINS ELIJAH 

And Ahab told Jezebel all Elijah had done and withal how he had slain 
all the prophets with the sword. 

Then Jezebel sent a message unto Elijah, so let the gods do to me and 
more also, If I make not thy life as the life of one of them by tomorrow 
about this time. 

And when he saw that, he arose and went fo oi* ' ; fe and came to 
Beer-sheba which belongeth to Judea and left his se' a here. 

But he himself went a day's journey into the wilderne <. " came and 
sat down under a juniper tree; and he requested for himself * .^ii <s might 
die; and said, enough; now, oh Lord, take away my life; for T r not bet- 
ter than my fathers. 

And as he lay and slept under a juniper tree, behold, then an angel 
touched him, and said unto him arise and eat. 

And he looked, and, behold, there was a cake baken on the coals and a 
cruse of water at his head. And he did eat and drink, and laid him down 
again. And the angel of the Lord came again a second time; and touch- 
ed him, and said, arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee. 

And he arose, and did eat and drink, and went in the strength of that 
meat forty days and forty nights unto Horeb, the mount of God. 

— 1 Kings 19:1-9. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state Kt 1( jnly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zton'e Xanfcmarh 

tDevotefc to the Cause of ^esus Christ 

^ 



YEARNINGS 

The veil of our flesh so oft inter- 
vening, 

The things of our God but obscure- 
ly we see; 

As through a glass darkly we gaze 
on His glories, 

But soon face to face with Emman- 
uel we'll be. 

Like one that's outside of the palace 
I wander, 

Yet, at times, through the lattice 
the King I have seen, 

The King in His beauty — O such 
ravishing glimpses, 

That my heart ever since taken cap- 
tive has been. 

As one veiled aside after him I am 
pining, 

Such a dreary waste desert is all 
unto me, 

When Jesus, most lovely, my hope 
my salvation 

Is absent, and I His dear face can- 
not see. 

The glimpses which, even to me, 
have been given 

Of the lovely Redeemer — such com- 
passion I've seen, 

My heart's drawn toward Him, I'm 
yearning and hoping 

To live'neath His smiles, and have 
no veil between. 

Frederick W. Keene, 
501 Cleveland Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 



A LITTLE TOOL 

A little tool am I; 

Just one within His hand, 

Just His to choose, 

And His to use ; 
Shaped out at His command. 

If He should lay me down 
Perhaps I might be sad! 

And wonder why 

He put me by, 
And never more be glad. 

Yet I would surely know 
Whatever He might do, 

However choose 

His tool to use 
His love was strong and true. 

Just looking in His face 

Although my heart might break 

I could but know 

He loved me so, 
There could be no mistake. 



HE KNOWETH THE WAY 
I TAKE. 

"He knoweth the way that I 
take: when he hath tried me, I 
shall come forth as gold." — Job. 
23:10. 

Though the Lord put a child of 
God in the furnace of afflictions 
many times yet he shall come forth 
to the praise of the graciousness of 
Our Heavenly Father. 

I have of late had many musings 
over the way in which, in the Lord's 
dealings with me, I have had to 



242 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



take. My pathway has not been 
that which I have devised, and I 
have learned somewhat that when 
I have been in the melting pot of 
Jehovah's dealings with me that I 
am not all gold but there has come 
to the surface a scum and dross 
that belongs to me an Adamic crea- 
ture. 

When a few days past my fif- 
teenth birthday it pleased God to 
call me by his grace to reveal his 
Son in me, and he laid in me the 
foundation of that good work, 
which he has continued to perform, 
and which I believe he will per- 
form until the day .of Jesus Christ. 
This quickening, this awakening, 
this calling of my soul from dark- 
ness to light, and from the power of 
Satan unto God, unto the fellow- 
ship of Jesus Christ, the only begot- 
ten Son of God, was in the first 
vital experimental steps thereof 
most dreadful, for I was awakened 
to the knowledge that I was a mis- 
erable, guilty sinner. I was plunged 
into an ocean of trouble. My in- 
iquities abounded and prevailed 
against me. I was immersed in 
condemnation and filled with ap- 
prehensions of the damnation of 
hell. 

I could see no escape for a vile 
sinner such as I felt myself to be. I 
was a transgressor under the sen- 
tence of God's law, which is holy, 
just and good. 

Here, at Mount Sinai I dwelt 
awhile and my soul wandered in 
darkness and tempest, and the voice 
of words, Heb. 12:19-21, so that I 
trembled with the anguish of my 
guilt. "Tribulation and anguish 
upon every soul that doeth evil." So 
I felt it, and in my heart I said, "If 
God speaks to me so I shall die in 



my sins and perish eternally. "The 
Lord our God spake unto us in 
Horeb, saying, Ye have dwelt long 
enough in this mount." Deut. 1 :6. 
So it was with me. 

It is the Lord who determines 
how long his people shall dwell at 
Mount Sinai. Some but a little 
while, others a long while, just that 
long they are taught, each one 
there, until God shall say to that 
humbled, wretched quaking sinner, 
"Ye have dwelt long enough in this 
Mount." The Holy Spirit led me 
and brought me to Mount Zion, 
where he commandeth the blessing 
even life forevermore. Psalm 133 :3, 
and then the blessed Comforter, the 
Holy Ghost, shewed to me the 
things of Christ, gave me a sight of 
Christ crucified, then I had glimp- 
ses of Jehovah's mercy flowing un- 
to wretched, vile sinners through 
the shedding of the precious blood 
many times since, how 

"Sweet the moments, rich in bless- 
ing, 

Which before the cross I spend; 
Life and health and peace possess- 
ing, 

From the sinner's dying Friend. 

of Christ, the dear Lamb of God. 
My heart was melted and the Spirit 
of grace of supplications was pour- 
ed into my soul and I cried for 
mercy. I mourned over my sins, 1 
was broken and contrite at the feet 
of the crucified One, and in due 
time there was conveyed to my dis- 
tressed heart the blessed assurance 
that Christ died for a poor sinner 
like me, and all my sins were for- 
given and washed away in Jesus 
precious blood. Then, and O, so 
Here I'll sit forever viewing, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Mercy's streams in streams of 
blood ; 

Precious drops my soul bedewing 
Plead and claim my peace with 
God." 

Since the time of my soul's first 
blessed intimacy with the beloved 
Savior what unnumbered tokens of 
his loving kindness have been my 
portion, and in my heart I am of- 
ten saying, "He is precious." 1 Peter 
2 :4. "Thou hast known my soul in 
adversities." Psalms 31 :7. When 
all refuge failed me, when every 
creature stood aloof from my dis- 
tress, when no one could know me, 
be intimate with me, no one cared 
for my soul, when it appeared that 
there were none in all the world 
that could or would know me. But 
in my distress the Lord was nigh, 
and to him I showed my trouble and 
poured into his bosom all my grief. 

Some of our fellows are ready t 
know us in fair weather, in the sun- 
shine, amidst the flowers and sing- 
ing of birds, but when in desola- 
tions, in the depths, in storms, in re- 
proaches for Christ's sake, who will 
know us then and stand by us. 
There is One who does, who stick- 
eth closer than a brother. Prov. 
18:24. "I did know thee in the wil- 
derness in the land of great 
drought." Hosea 13:5. Deut 8:15. 
"Notwithstanding the Lord stood 
with me, and strengthened me." 2 
Tim. 4:16-17. Then, in such places, 
"He near my soul has always stood, 
his loving kindness, O, how good!" 

The past year has been to me a 
year of burdens. The Lord put up- 
on me, put into my life that which 
was not of my choosing. Ah, little 
did I think twelve months ago that 
I was entering into troubles that 



few are made to know. The pres- 
sure, the strain that I was under 
for some months was such that I 
was worried indeed. I spent the 
days, the hours, well nigh all the 
time of those months in fretful- 
ness, in murmurings, in self pity, 
quarrelling with the Lord, who was 
showing me hard things. And then 
I would find myself for a few mo- 
ments repenting of my rebellion 
against his providences, and I 
would fall at the feet of the Lord 
and sue for his mercy, compassion, 
his upholding, his counsel, but Ah! 
so soon my perverseness, my un- 
reconciliation would return and I 
would spend my hours with grief, 
sighs and tears, self pitying tears. 
O, how I bemoaned myself, and 
murmured, I indeed, I thought well 
to be angry with the Lord because 
of his providences. Ah, Brother 
Jonah, I used to be ashamed of you, 
Jonah 3 :9, and I am still and loathe 
your behavior, but I see and feel 
most unmistakably that left to my- 
self I am just as foolish and per- 
verse and I am made to loathe and 
hate my sinful life. 

The particulars of these dispen- 
sations of the Lord, the things he 
put upon me to suffer and do I need 
not tell, but there came a time 
when the Lord put an end to my 
quarreling with him, my hard 
thoughts were gone, my fretfulness 
because of the tribulations of my 
path, was hushed, and I think I 
shall not soon forget how my God 
brought me into submission, yea, 
even to acquiescence to his dispen- 
sations, and in my chastened soul 
I was saying, "Thy will be done." 
Do with me and unto me as seem- 
eth good in thy sight. 

One morning, very early, before 



244 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



arising from my bed I lay brooding 
over my lot, bemoaning myself, and 
rebellious over what I felt the Lord 
was moving me to do. Suddenly I 
forgot all about these matters and 
T fell into pleasing soothing mus- 
ings upon the loving kindness of 
the Lord to me, a vile transgressor, 
in all the way that I had come since 
I first knew the Lord or rather was 
known of him in the wondrous ex- 
perience of his everlasting love in 
my heart. Then it was as though 
the Lord did draw forth my soul 
unto him, to make me ashamed, to 
blush over my cowardly behavior, 
my foolish peevishness, quarrelsome 
thoughts and speeches, and this he 
spake to my heart, "Have I not 
loved thee with an everlasting 
love? I was startled, for this voice 
came into my heart kindly, 
treatingly. Had the word been as 
a hammer, heavy blows of hi 
hand, sharp rebukes for my rebel 
liousness, then to me it seemed it 
would have been what I might hav 
expected, but for the Lord to come 
with such gentleness was what I 
did not expect, and I was humbled, 
ashamed, and blushed before the 
Lord. My heart smote me under 
the consciousness of my perverse- 
ness, and the hard thoughts that I 
had been having for about thre 
months, of the Lord. Then ques- 
tion after question very lovingly 
poured in and my heart had to an- 
swer, "I hope I am loved of thee." 

"Have I not chosen thee in Christ 
Jesus before the foundation of the 
world? Have I not blessed thee in 
him with all spiritual blessings in 
heavenly places? Have I not re- 
deemed thee by my precious blood? 
Art thou not mine, espoused to me, 
holden to me in bonds of eternal 
wedlock? Have I not forgiven 



thee all thy trespasses? Have I 
not called thee by my grace? Have 
not streams of mercy never ceasing 
been thy portion? Am I not bring- 
ing thee home to myself in glory? 
Art thou not mine Have I not the 
right to do with thee as seemeth 
good in my sight, to use thee in my 
kingdom as it pleaseth me? I was 
overcome, I burst into tears, I sur- 
rendered, I fell down at his feet, I 
sued for mercy, I craved his for 
giveness for all my sinfulness, all 
my unkindness, all my hard speech 
es, and I said, "Thy will be done." 
Do unto and with me as thou wilt. 
Only stand by me, give me thy 
grace to endure all things and to 
glorify thee in my body and spirit 
which are thine." I was solaced 
with the sweet love of Christ, 
mused upon his deeds of love, his 
sufferings and blood, and the bless 
edness was mine in believing that 
"He loved me and gave himself for 
me." Oh, what ineffable compas- 
sion has been bestowed upon me, 
such exceeding riches of grace in 
his kindness to me through Christ 
Jesus. 

One thing I have found, beloved 
in the Lord, in all the trials, the 
burdens, the afflictions of my soul, 
that they have been working for 
my good, for under the pressure of 
them I have been so weak in myself 
I am not equal to endure the things 
that have daily been my portion, 
and I have been driven and drawn 
to seek the face of the Lord for 
grace to help in times of my need. 
And what relief, what consolations 
I have found at the mercy seat. 
Here in faith and hope in the blood 
sealed mercies of the everlasting 
covenant I am comforted, my cup is 
sweetened, and I am saying, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



245 



"Only reserved for Christ who died 
Surrendered to the Crucified." 

Though I have penned this, so 
well I know that abundance of 
grace from the Lord must be minis- 
tered to me every moment or I shall 
go astray, wandering in dismal un- 
belief, departing from the living 
God. Heb. 3:12. Oh, for grace 
to cleave to the Lord with full pur- 
pose of heart. 

Frederick W. Keene, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



THE CHURCH IN CHRIST. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear brother in Christ: 

I will enclose a letter from bro- 
ther John M. Gibson and if it meets 
your approval and you have space 
in the Landmark you are at liberty 
to publish it. It seems very deep 
to me and yet it seems to have a fa- 
miliar sound that makes me feel 
that it is the truth as it stands re- 
corded in the Good Book. I have 
never been able to bring out and 
explain the deep doctrine subjects 
in the scriptures like my brethren. 
I often think about when I was a 
boy around twelve or thirteen years 
old, my father hired a stone mason 
to lay a wall on our farm. This 
man would put the large stones in 
the wall first. They were called 
the binder stones. He told me to 
put in the very small ones for chink- 
ing and this is about all I have done 
among our deep gifted preachers, 
if I am not mistaken in my mind 
and feelings. Many years ago I 
was made willing to be anything or 
nothing if it would help the cause 
of my dear Redeemer and I hope 
that feeling will remain with me to 
my journey's end. I feel that I am 



near the end of an unprofitable life 
from every standpoint. 

Yours, I hope in Christian love, 
D. M. Vail 
28 Willard St. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
P. S. — I am still very much inter- 
ested in Zion's Landmark and do 
what I can to place it before the 
people wherever I go. It is good 
substantial reading for Heaven 
and grace taught people. — D. M. V. 



The Letter. 

Dear brother Vail : 

I have felt so broken of late that 
it seemed I could not reply to your 
letter of last March. While you 
only wrote a few lines, you laid the 
whole foundation and building of 
the church in Christ and if this doc- 
trine was adhered to at all times it 
would eliminate much of the trou- 
ble that has sprung up in the 
churches. To my mind, the most 
dangerous enemies of the church 
are the various forms of doctrine 
by which man's free agency is 
brought in. Every motion to set 
up creative works is one to estab- 
lish self in Christ's stead; where 
self is not fully crucified, Christ 
cannot reign in the fulness of His 
glory and satan is ever dressing 
new tactics in pleasing robes, to the 
carnal sense of man, to rob, and 
despoil Christ of His glory in the 
redemption of His Church. But 
blessed be God forever, not one of 
His shall perish by the way, or en- 
large satan's kingdom in eternity. 
I often feel so cold and lifeless I go 
mourning all the night, so dreadful 
and long, and yet again when the 
morning of His peaceful presence 
breaks forth, my soul is wafted on 
the wings of triumphant faith, to a 



246 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



perfect peace and trust in the good- 
ness and wondrous mercy of my 
ever blessed Saviour: in moments 
of such divine ec'stacy I am lifted 
above every trial, hardship and dis- 
appointment of the weary life and 
rejoice with a joy unspeakable and 
full of glory, that God, in the provi- 
dence of His grace could cause such 
a poor sinful, ignorant worm of the 
dust to ascribe all praise and glory 
to His ever blessed and holy name. 
Separated as I am from all personal 
intercourse with God's humble poor 
I will at times beseech my blessed 
Lord to open a way for me to be 
more pleasantly located, where I 
might have the personal fellowship, 
and communion of those I so dearly 
love, and where prosperity and wel- 
fare are ever as my heart at a 
throne of grace. O brother Vail, 
what a precious Jesus we have, to 
whom we can go with our many 
burdens to find consolation and 
strength to triumph over them all, 
cast all in faith upon His promises 
which cannot fail us. Though He 
leads us through the deep waters 
of affliction He has said in His 
blessed word "they shall not over- 
flow thee," we shall never be 
swallowed up with the floods of 
false doctrines that dethrone God 
and exalt man. "Though you pass 
through fire it shall not kindle upon 
thee." All the fires of persecution, 
whatever their nature, shall not 
destroy that little hope God ever 
keeps alive, by giving grace to 
stand, knowing that the glorious 
Captain of our salvation passed 
through their all, and came forth, 
a conqueror over death, hell and 
the grave animates through grace 
to a blessed hope that we too, shall 
conquer through Him. This brings 



me to a contemplation of the glori- 
ous work of redemption as wrought 
by Christ in His incarnation to 
which I aspire for a gift of words to 
portray. There seems before me a 
wondrous light no human tongue 
can speak or mortal words convey; 
when I attempt writing on this 
theme I am lost in admiration and 
wonder, I can see Christ the media- 
tor, most glorious in his person, 
work and incarnation, working out 
the salvation of His people, being 
born into the world, the immacu- 
late Son of God, enduring all 
through the privation of a complete 
denial of self and sinless obedience 
to God as the Almighty Father; 
dying at the hands of His enemies, 
sealed in the grave by them, but 
trusting the hands of death arising 
a triumphant conqueror forever 
and eternally, to be worshipped and 
adored by a creature created by 
God and springing from nothing 
excites in my soul an admiration I 
pray God, in His ever blessed grace, 
to give me language to tell. All 
His other works of creation, how- 
ever they surpass our loftiest con- 
ceptions, yet fade in their greatness 
as compared with the redemption 
of man. They have their place, in 
the mighty power of God, but can 
never truly apprehend only as we 
see their pointing to, and springing 
from the fulfilling of the plans of 
the Eternal Trinity in God's great 
scheme of redemption. O Brother 
Vail, pray for me, such a poor weak 
instrument of God's blessed grace. 
O that God, the fountain of all spir- 
itual light, life and hope would 
grant me in His mercy to write you 
a comprehensive exposition of the 
unspeakable glory of God shining 
forth in it all, but at present it is too 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



247 



much for me and I must leave it un- 
said. 

Expositions of it I have read but 
to me they seem in some way to fall 
short of bringing out the fulness 
thereof. And unless God gives me 
more light, I feel I must remain 
silent; to tarnish His refulgent 
glory in trying to portray in words 
His incomprehensible glory I can- 
not, perhaps it is not His will that 
I should ever write on such a theme 
for I know it is entering on a vast 
ocean of boundless thought, the 
depth of which can never be sound- 
ed by mortal man, for it is hidden 
away in the depth of the divine es- 
sence of the Holy Trinity, yet its 
glory, as revealed, in the Incarnate 
Christ, can be apprehended if never 
spoken, we glean this fulness from 
His blessed word, understood only 
in the light of the Holy Spirit's 
teaching; and thru the Holy Spirit, 
the Spirit of all grace and supplica- 
tion we shall be given in God's way 
and time, everything to supply our 
needs for this mortal life. It was 
the Captain of our salvation, the 
Lord of Hosts is His name, who pur- 
posed this in the everlasting coun- 
cils of eternity, and in due time ful- 
filled it by His almighty power, 
therefore His provision for His elect 
is as certain as God Himself. En- 
able us, then, Almighty Jesus to 
look to Thee for Thy promised 
grace. O grant us constant sup- 
plies of thy spirit, that we may 
profit by our infirmities to an exer- 
cise and strengthening of faith in 
Thee. O Blessed Lord, keep us 
humble that we may pray more in 
faith, and pour forth from a con- 
trite heart more of praise to Thee. 
Thine arm is not shortened, nor can 
Thy compassion fail. Stand by us, 



O our God, and hold us up accord- 
ing to thy word, make us strong in 
thy strength, that we may trust 
more implicitly to thy love and 
power; be thou our portion and 
strength forever that we may rest 
quietly in thy hand without mur- 
muring or repining, believing that 
thou art all our salvation, let us live 
and die in the faith of thine elect, 
Amen. 

Hoping to be remembered by you, 
and thanking you for the fellow- 
ship and love of remembrance, I 
bid you farewell until such time 
when I hope and trust to be with 
you again by letter. Most unwor- 
thily I feel to be yours to serve in 
the glory of our blessed Master. 

John M. Gibson. 

P. S. — My address is not changed 
although at present from home. My 
address is Box 782, Horse, Mon- 
tana. 



ENJOYS THE WRITINGS 

Mr. John Gold and Editors: 

Inclosed find money to renew my 
subscription to the Landmark for 
another year to May 1931. 

I enjoy the editors writing very 
much, and feel that they are very 
instructing, and too that each of 
them I feel is living in their every 
day life, what they in writing and 
preaching proclaim to others to do. 

I enlisted with the dear old 
church 37 years ago last November. 
I hope I saw with an eye of faith 
the love of dear Jesus there and 
felt when with our people I was 
with those that loved dear Jesus, 
who has forgiven all of our sins, 
and that they would hover such a 
little poor weak child as I under 
their wings of love. I knew I loved 
them and desired their love; and I 



248 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



hope I'm in the same feeling today. 
The true old church and its doc- 
trine is what I desire to love and 
adore so long as I live in this world. 
At times I feel Lord wilt thou let 
me fall; but his promise is sure, he 
has promised us to never leave nor 
forsake his people. 

As time is fast gliding on and I'm 
near the journey of my destiny; 
surely I hope he will lead me by his 
hand of protection and let flow a 
fragrant perfume of his love and 
kindness in my poor heart. He has 
been so kind all the days of my life. 
I desire to adore and praise his holy 
name, and pray that he will gently 
lead me all the way. 

God in his mercy gave us his dear 
Son, the Saviour of sinners. 

This sweet hope in Jesus is so 
precious, how we should cherish it. 
It's worth more than the gold of 
Opher and the cattle of a thousand 
hills, for it will take us to that beau- 
tiful heaven above. There we'll 
sing in the presence of God and his 
angels in the great dazzling light 
of his countenance. Then we will 
be satisfied ; and there will be no 
trials, nor sorrow, in that blissful 
heaven above. 

Written in love and prayer for 
Zion. 

Mr. Gold, please send my Land- 
mark in the same name, Mrs. Lula 
Overton, as I get it O. K. in this 
name. 

Mrs. Lula Hurst O. Hyman, 
Tarboro, N. C. Route 3. 



A PRECIOUS LETTER. 

Eld. S. B. Denny, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Brother: 

I am enclosing a letter from sis- 
ter Belle Benton of Greensboro, N. 



C. that seems very precious to me 
since I've been sick. This dear sis- 
ter has been helpless for several 
years, not able to move herself, yet 
is one of the little ones. She loves 
for the members to come to see her 
and unconsciously cheers and 
brightens those who are well and 
know nothing of pain or sickness. 

After being with her but a few 
minutes, I felt how much better to 
be in her condition and resigned to 
God's will, than to be well and wild 
with the ways of the world. 

I think of her often, especially 
of late and it helps me to continue 
on my way. 

Yours in love, 

H. L. BRAKE. 



The Letter 

Dear Brother: 

I will try to dictate a few lines in 
answer to your nice letter of a few 
days ago. I appreciated it and en- 
joyed it more than words can tell. 
It helped me so much and I feel so 
thankful to know my friends are 
thinking of me and that they really 
care enough to make my life bright- 
er. Yet, I feel so unworthy of their 
love and sympathy. It seems to me 
that God showers his blessings on 
me more and more every day. 

I appreciated the check you sent 
me so much. I shall have my Land- 
mark renewed soon. I enjoy read- 
ing it very much; I don't get to 
hear preaching very often so of 
course I certainly do enjoy it when 
I do go. 

May God bless you for your kind- 
ness and thoughtfulness of us. 

I often think of the Thanksgiving 
you all were here. Mother and I 
enjoyed it so much even though 
your visit was so short. We enjoy- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



249 



ed the singing so much. I hope, if 
it be God's will, that you can come 
again real soon. 

Mother is worn out and has every- 
thing to see after since papa is gone. 
We miss him more and more every 
day, but I feel sure our loss is his 
gain. This is a very poor letter 
and I hope you will excuse it. 

With love and best wishes, 
Yours in hope, 
Belle Benton, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



ADVERSITY 

It appears from the Bible that 
nations and kingdoms, families 
and individuals are sure to have 
periods of adversity. And of 
course have times of prosperity, 
for, "God has set one over against 
the other, to the end that men shall 
find nothing after him." Eccl. 7:14. 
I knew by experience that adver- 
sity in soul, or in common things, is 
a trial, but more people fall in a 
state of prosperity than in adver- 
sity. 

Saul says, "I have learned that 
whatever state I am in, therewith 
to be content; I have learned both 
how to abound and how to suffer 
need." 

Adversity, then, would mean to 
be poor and needy, and this is a 
state that no human can aspire to, 
and one in which we feel sure we 
will never change. We are so apt 
to faint, and give up, when adver- 
sity comes. A true saying, "pros- 
perity gains many friends, but ad- 
versity tries them." 

"If thou faint in the day of ad- 
versity, thy strength is small." 
Prov. 24:10. 

This thought can be plainly seen 
by reading all of Prov. 24. I be- 
lieve right here I shall insist upon 



all who may be interested in such a 
subject to read all of Prov. 24. 

Right now is a day of the plainest 
adversity I have ever seen, and I 
did not know what the word "ad- 
versity meant until now. I think I 
am now in the humblest state or con- 
dition I have ever been in before. 
And I can say like David in Psalms 
142:4. "I looked on my right hand, 
and beheld, but there was no man 
that would know me; refuge failed 
me; no man cared for my soul." I 
close directly, for I know it will not 
be received only by those in similar 
condition ; and it is only one way of 
"broadcasting" and it can't be re- 
ceived only by an instrument pre- 
pared to receive it. If there is a 
corresponding spirit, that eye, if 
this should reach the public, will 
catch it, once more. Last Sunday 
night in the midnight darkness, I 
pondered our state well, and Heb. 
13:3 came vividly to me — "Remem- 
ber them that are in bonds, as bound 
with them: and them which suffer 
adversity, as being yourselves also 
in the body." "O for such love let 
rocks and hills their lasting silence 
break." 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



SALLIE A. TRAVIS 

Sallie A. Travis, age 72 years, fell 
asleep suddenly on the morning of March 
15th., 1930. "A sleep from which none 
ever wakes to weep." 

We, the church at Moon's Creek desire 
to bow in humble submission to our 
heavenly Father's will. "He giveth and 
He taketh away, blessed be His holy 
name." Sister Travis had been a mem- 
ber of this church since the year 1886. She 
was ever ready to give God all the glory. 
We sadly miss her pleasant face, but in 
Spirit we rejoice that sin can have no 
more dominion over her, believing that 
our loss is her gain. 

We desire these expressions of respect 
to be recorded in our church book and a 
copy sent to Zion's Landmark for publica- 
tion. 

Belle Neal, Church Clerk. 



250 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zion's Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 

VOL. LXIII. NO. 16 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 

WILSON, N. C. JULY 1, 1930 

THE WORLD KNEW HIM NOT. 

John 1:10. He was in the world, 
and the world was made by Him, 
and the world knew Him not. In 
the preceding verse John calls Him 
the word, and says that he was with 
God, and that He was God. Also 
that ail things were made by Him 
and without Him was not anything 
made that was made. Think of a 
being with creative power, making 
the heavens and the earth out of 
nothing. The sun, moon and stars 
are also the work of his hands. The 
word tells us that God is a Spirit, 
and we understand that as a spirit 
He was and is in all the universe, 
and is absent from no person or 
thing. The animal creation could 
not breathe without Him, the vege- 
table kingdom could not bud and 
bear fruit without him, the rain and 



the snow could not come without 
Him. He sendeth the rain upon 
the just and the unjust and the 
snow cometh down from heaven, 
and He rules the inhabitants of the 
earth, and His eye is in every place 
beholding the good and the evil. Do 
we realize that God sees us all the 
time? Whether we do good or bad 
in the light or in the dark He sees 
us, for the light and the darkness 
are both alike to Him. He is a 
wonderful being, that we can never 
understand. He is everywhere all 
the time and nothing is hid from 
His all-seeing eyes. But John is 
telling of his coming in a special 
way and for a special purpose the 
word was made flesh and dwelt 
among us. We are flesh and all 
flesh is as grass and therefore 
withers away, and all its glory pass- 
es away, and this embraces man 
who in his best estate is altogether 
vanity and man has fallen from his 
best estate. He has transgressed 
the holy law of God and in this way 
become a sinner, for sin is the trans- 
gression of the law. And now his 
heart is deceitfully wicked above 
all things, but God who is a spirit, 
did choose out of the race of man a 
people for himself, and that before 
the foundation of the world. And 
he did choose them in his Son Jesus 
Christ, who was ever with the Fath- 
er, and His delight was with the 
sons of men. And though they have 
sinned and become vile and black it 
is not the will of this gloriously mys- 
terious God that one of His should 
be lost, and so he laid help upon one 
mighty to save, even upon Jesus 
who in the fullness of time, that is 
the appointed time, came into the 
world, taking not on him the nature 
of angels, but the seed of Abraham. 
The word God is made flesh, that 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



251 



he might by experience know man's 
infirmities and be easily touched 
when he cries unto him. He made 
the world and has power over it. 
He made man and he has power 
over him. Therefore when he says 
to man's heart, Seek ye my face, his 
heart says, thy face Lord will I 
seek. The world did not know the 
God who made it, and who dwelt in 
it. He came unto his own and his 
own received him not. The Jews 
were his own but they neither knew 
him nor received him. They said, 
we will not have the man Christ 
Jesus to reign over us. As a nation 
they rejected him, but some be- 
lieved in and received him. Why 
did some receive him, love him, and 
worship him? Because they were 
born not of blood, nor the will of the 
flesh, nor of man but of God. The 
dead sinner must be made alive and 
none but God can do it. You hath 
he quickened who were dead. 
Eph. The mission of Jesus in the 
world was to save sinners, (Paul to 
Timothy) not to try to save, or to 
offer salvation, but to save, and he 
shall not fail, but safely bring home 
to his Father all that he gave him. 
He gave himself the just for the un- 
just that he might bring us to God, 
being put to death in the flesh, but 
quickened by the Spirit. No man 
can say that Jesus is the Lord but 
by the Holy Ghost. So the world 
that lieth in wickedness does not 
know him today. He is known 
only as he reveals himself, and he 
reveals himself to his own and not 
unto the world. John 14:22. May 
the Lord give us to love him and 
serve him. Also to love one another 
for his sake, and to serve each other, for 
in as much as ye have done it to the least 
of these my brethren ye have done it unto 

JOSHUA T. ROWE 



RESOLUTIONS OP RESPECT OF 
W. G. TURNER 
(By Black River Church) 
WHEREAS, on the 7th day of April, 
1930, it pleased our Heavenly Father to 
removed from us our beloved brother and 
pastor, Elder W. G. Turner, who was born 
on the 2 0th day of April in the year of 
cur Lord 1855 in Johnston County, mak- 
ing his stay here on earth 74 years, 11 
months, 18 days. Brother Turner was a 
fiequent visitor to all the surrounding 
churches. He loved the fellowship of his 
brethren where ever they were in peace 
with one another. His greatest impression 
seemed to be on teaching the Church how 
to live, and admonishing them to their du- 
ties. He was greatly loved by all who 
knew him; his life was above reproach at 
home and in his ministerial work, he will 
b-i greatly missed in his community and 
by his brethren. As a husband, he was 
humble and loving to his companion and 
as v. father, he tried to keep the law given 
in the Scriptures concerning the way to 
raise them up. He was honest and up- 
right in all his dealings with his fellow- 
man. Could give a great deal more of his 
way of living, but space won't permit. 

He united iwth the Church at New Hope 
Meeting House in the Little River Asso- 
ciation on Saturday before the 4th Sunday 
in June 1888, and just one year after that 
date, he began to exercise in public. After 
a number of years, he moved his member- 
ship ever into the Seven Mile Association 
with the Church at Primitive Zion. He 
was pastor for that Church for a number 
of years, and while serving there, the 
Church at Black River, called him as pas- 
tor and he served the Church faithfully as 
long as he lived. Sometime during his 
pastorial work at Black River, he decided 
to move his membership there and he pre- 
sented a letter for membership and was 
gladly received, remaining there until his 
deatb. Brother Turner, at the time of his 
departure, had the care of two Churches 
as pastor. The other one, being Mount 
Zion, Benson, N. C. He was chosen Mod- 
erator of the Seven Mile Association some- 
time prior to his death and was still serv- 
ing in that capacity when death called. 
He was highly appraised by all who knew 
him. He lived a life here that was above 
reproach. As a father and husband, he 
was just a model man, loved and highly 
esteemed by all who knew him. We feel 
that our loss will be his eternal gain. 

Now, therefor, be it Resolved: (1st.) 
That we the Church at Black River desire 
to bow in humble submission to the dis- 
pensation of our God's providence, feeling 
that our loss is his eternal gain and hoping 
that it may be in the providence of our 
God, that we may be so lead that when 
tho hour of our departure comes, that we 
may join wtih him and all those who have 
gone on before to ascribe greatness and 
praise to Israel's God. 



252 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



(2nd.) That a copy of these Resolu- 
tions be spread upon our minutes; one 
sent to the Landmark; one to the Primi- 
tive Baptist for publication and one to the 
bereaved family. 

May God bless and keep us all in the 
ways of truth. 

L. P. Jernigan 
W. P. Griffin 
J. H. Norris, 

Committee. 
G. O. Godwin, Church Clerk 



ELDER WILLIAM G. TURNER. 

In the passing from time to eternity on 
April 7th, 1930 of our beloved father, El- 
der William G. Turner, his family has lost 
a husband and father, his church one of 
its most ardent advocators of the faith 
once delivered to the saints and his com- 
munity; a friend that will be long remem- 
bered after his mortal remains have set- 
tled back to the dust from whence they 
came. 

We, his children, desire to honor the 
name of our father who taught us to honor 
thy father and thy mother, as the Lord 
thy God hath commanded thee; that thy 
days may be prolonged, and that it may 
go well with thee in the land which the 
Lord thy God giveth thee. We can per- 
form no duty more noble and respectful 
than to show by our walk in life the in- 
destructible remains of such admonition 
which is to exemplify not only our earthly 
father but our Heavenly Father in whose 
mansions of glory we believe now rests the 
spirit of our father. 

Father was born April 20th, 1855 in 
Johnston County, North Carolina. He 
was but a child during the throes of the 
Civil War and related to us how he went 
without shoes and necessary raiment one 
whole winter during this great struggle. 

His parents being of only moderate 
means he was unable to take advantage 
of the limited educational facilities avail- 
able at that time. He entered school at 
the age of eighteen, having learned only 
his letters. At the end of about two years 
he had been promoted to the advanced 
classes, which showed his remarkable 
progress in school. About this time his 
health failed and upon the advice of his 
physician he abandoned further education- 
al "work and entered the carpenter trade 
as a profession, which he continued until 
some years before his death. He was mar- 
ried June 15th., 1879 to Cornelia E. Wil- 
liams who survives him to mourn with us 
our great loss. 

Father united with the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at New Hope Meeting House 
Saturday before the fourth Sunday in June 
1888 and began his ministry late in 1889. 

In 1907 he was elected to the State Sen- 
ate from his district comprising Johnston, 
Harnett and Sampson Counties and served 
with honor his country. 

The last years of his life were spent on 



his farm near Dunn, N. C. He was pastor 
of two or three churches and most of his 
time was spent in filling his place in the 
difierent churches and visiting the sick 
and afflicted in his community. 

His life was consecrated to the cause of 
the church of God aud his country. There- 
fore, we feel that he could say with the 
apostle — I have fought a good fight, I 
have finished my course, I have kept the 
faith. Henceforth there is laid up for me 
a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, 
tho righteous judge, shall give me at that 
day, and not to me only, but unto all 
them that love his appearing. We believe 
he could say with the poet who so beauti- 
fully expressed it in these words, 

"I long to see my Father's face, 
And sing his praises, too; 
Adieu, companions, dearest friends, 
Vain world, once more, adieu." 

The large number of friends who 
gathered around his grave attested the 
high esteem in which he was held in his 
community. 

(Written by His Children). 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas God in his infinite wisdom, 
love and mercy has visited us and has 
claimed by death our beloved Brother, El- 
der Samuel McMillon, on the eleventh day 
of April A. D. 1930. 

And whereas we keenly feel that in his 
death the Church at Salisbury has lost a 
highly esteemed Brother, and a precious 
gift as a minister of the Gospel of Jesus 
Christ; and an humble defender of the 
doctrine and true principles of the Church. 
Also the several Churches which compose 
the Abbotts Creek Association have lost 
an able, faithful, humble servant, modera- 
tor and advisor — one who stood faithfully 
on the walls of Zion, always giving warn- 
ings and advice when necessary for the 
peace and welfare of. the Churches and 
the great cause he loved so well. 

Elder McMillon delighted in serving his 
Master, going far and near to declare that 
doctrine that is sweeter than life and 
stronger than death. His last visit to 
Salisbury Church was on the fifth Sunday 
in March A. D. 1930, and on this last visit 
he was blessed to preach the Gospel in the 
power and demonstration of the Holy 
Spirit of God to the satisfaction of the 
faithful in Christ. 

We feel that the memory of this servant 
of God will live long in the hearts and 
minds of the Lord's people who knew him. 

And whereas Elder McMillon came to us 
by letter in the year of 1913, and has 
served us continually as pastor half time 
since he was chosen in 1916. 

And whereas his wife has lost a faith- 
ful, loving husband, and his children a 
loving father. We hope they will remem- 
ber his good advice and admonition. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



2 53 



Therefore be it resolved: 

1st. That we bow in humble submission 
to the will of God who kept our precious 
Brother in life, and did not forsake him 
in death. 

2nd. That we humbly beg the Lord to 
keep us and enable us to fight the good 
fight of faith as our precious Brother did, 
and finally land us safely on the sunny 
banks of sweet deliverance with him where 
troubles, trials, conflicts, sickness, sor- 
rows and death will have no more power 
over us. 

3rd — That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the bereaved family and one to 
Zion's Landmark for publication and have 
same recorded in our Church book. 

Done by order of the Church while in 
conference on Saturday before the first 
Sunday in May, 1930. 

Elder D. P. Broadway, Mod. 
C. B. Owen, Clerk. 



WILLIAM ISAAC CANADY 

With a sad and broken heart I make the 
attempt to write the death of my dear 
father, who departed this life, August 25, 
1929, following an illness of several 
months. All was done for father that 
loving hands could do, but nothing can 
stay the hand of death, but all his toils 
and grief are over and he is freed from 
pain. 

Father never united with any church, 
but he believed in the doctrine of salvation 
by grace. He had a good hope, loved the 
Primitive Baptist, and would attend their 
meetings regular, and his home was a 
home with them. He delighted to be with 
them and hear them preach. 

No one knows how we miss him, and 
how lonesome it is without him. Home 
will never seem the same. It is so hard 
to part from the ones you love so well, 
but we feel satisfied about him, that he 
has gone to rest in the arms of Jesus. 
Why should we grieve after the loved 
one that we believe are resting in the 
arms of Jesus. Oh! how could we wish 
him back in this world of sin and sorrow, 
when the Lord saw it best to take him 
home to rest where we hope to meet him 
on that happy shore, where parting will 
be known no more. 

I know there has never lived a more 
truthful and faithful husband and father 
than he was. He was always bright and 
had a comforting word for every one when 
in trouble. He was loved by all who 
knew him. But since it has been God's 
will to take him away we must be submis- 
sive, ever looking unto him for all things, 
and may each of us follow his example 
and if it is God's will meet him in the 
Great Beyond. 

Father was a quiet, unassuming lover 
of peace, always attending the church 
with much care. He was truthful and 
honest in all his dealings. He has left be- 
hind him the savor of a good name. 



He left a broken hearted wife, and ten 
children, three daughters and seven sons, 
and a host of relatives and friends to 
mourn our loss; but we feel our loss is his 
eternal gain. 

The funeral service was conducted at 
Wolf Island Church, by Elder O. J. Denny 
and Elder D. V. Spangler, and he was laid 
to rest in the Wolf Island Cemetery. 

Precious Father, he has left us, 

Left us, yes forever more; 
But we hope to meet our loved one, 
On that bright and happy shore. 

Lonely the house, and sad the hours 
Since our dear father has gone; 

But Oh! a brighter home than ours, 
In Heaven is now his home. 

A precious one from us has gone 

A voice we loved is stilled; 
A place is vacant in our home, 

Which never can be filled. 

God in his wisdom, has recalled, 

The boon his love, has given, 
And though the body slumbers here. 
The soul is safe in Heaven. 

Farewell, dear Father, thou has gone, 
Yes gone to thy heavenly home, 

There we hope to meet thee, 
Where parting is not known. 

Gone from a world of trouble 

Reached a fairer shore, 
Dear one we miss thee, 

But we should weep no more. 

Though gone from us dear one 

To reign with angels above, 
To rest forever wtih Jesus, 

And sing redeeming love. 

We loved him, yes we loved him, 

But angels loved him best, 
And they have sweetly called him 

To yonder shining shore. 

His loving daughter, 
Edna. 



A COLORED MAN 

Nelson Lloyd, a negro that lived with 
Mr. Harris' father and with us about 20 
years or more, died the 12th day of Janu- 
ary, 19 29. I don't know his age but it 
was in his eighties. He was a worthy 
negro and lived a Christian life. He was 
not a member of any church but he enjoy- 
ed going to preaching. It was interesting 
to hear him talk. He was bright in the 
Scriptures. He used to come around to 
see us after we came from Greensboro, N. 
C. I always remembered him with some- 
thing. Money or something good to eat, 
if I had it. He was smart to work as long 
as he was able. He used to do little things 
for us as long as he could, I told him one 



254 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



day he was too old to work. He said he 
felt better satisfied at work. I gave him 
something just the same, whether he work- 
ed or not. I believe in being charitable 
to the old and afflicted. Some people 
send their money across the waters. It is 
all right if they have a mind to do so. We 
have the poor and needy everywhere. 

Nelson was smart and saved up a little 
money for sickness and burial expenses. 
He did not want to be burdensome to any 
body. He gave his money to Orange Cot- 
ten, his friend, to take care of him in sick- 
ness and death if he was the longest liver, 
and when Nelson got sick Orange sent for 
him and took care of his as long as he 
lived and buried him in a decent way. 
Nelson was sick only a week and died easy. 
I believe he is gone to rest for he left a 
good report. He used to sell things for 
Mr. Harris while on the farm. He carried 
fruits and other things to town to sell and 
he always would keep Mrs. Harris' money 
to itself and not mix it with his, to be sure 
to have it right. He believed in doing 
everything all right. He believed in the 
Primitive Baptist doctrine. I believe he 
is in Heaven today if we judge the tree by 
the fruit it bears. He bore a good name 
and walked it out. 

Mrs. L. Y. Harris, 

Tarboro, N. C. 



OUR DARLING 

In the year nineteen hundred and twenty- 
nine, 

On the twenty-ninth day of November 
Is the day we lost our darling Iris, 
And a day we will always remember. 

Two years, eight months and fourteen days 

Is the time she spent with us, 

Is the time we were made happy with her 

baby ways, 
Now she is with Jesus at rest. 

We laid her beneath beautiful flowers, 
Beautiful flowers she loved so well, 
Oh, it was hard to leave her there 
So hard to say darling Iris farewell. 

We loved her Oh! how we loved her 
But Jesus loved her more 
Now He has called her home to Him 
On that bright and shining shore. 

Now she is safe in the arms of Jesus 
Safe on His gentle breast, 
Where she will never weep no more 
And is at perfect rest. 

We could not wish her back again 
But say dear Iris with Jesus remain, 
We will try and gain that peaceful shore 
Where those we meet will part no more. 

But a precious one from us has gone 
A voice we loved is still, 
A place is vacant in our home 
That never can be filled. 



Around her little grave we linger, 
Until the setting sun is low, 
Feeling all our hopes are perished 
With the flower we cherished so. 

She will sleep but not forever 
In the lone and silent grave, 
Blessed be the Lord that taketh 
Blessed be the Lord that gave. 

She was too pure for this cold earth 
Too beautiful to stay, 
And so God's holy angel bore 
Our darling Iris away. 

"I take these little lambs," said He, 
"And lay them in my breast, 
Protection they shall find in me, 
In me be ever blest. 

Though lost, she is lost to earth alone, 
Above she can be found, 
Amidst the stars, and near the throne, 
Which babies, like her surround. 

Look upward and my baby I see 
Fixed in her blest abode, 
What parent would not childless be 
To give a child to God. 

But you left behind a broken heart 
That loved you so sincere, 
That never did, and never will 
Forget you Irish dear. 

Nothing but memories, as I journey on 
Longing for a smile from a dear one gone, 
None knows the depth of my deep regret, 
But I remember when others forget. 

In memory of our darling 
Wilma Iris Williford 
By her father and mother 
Roy and Alice Williford. 



SISTER LUETTIE AKINS 

Sister Akins was the wife of W. H. 
Akins. I was requested by Bro. Akins 
(her sorrowing husband) to preach her 
funeral. They both being members of 
Camp Cheek Church and are highly es- 
teemed and much loved. I have had the 
honor (though feel unworthy) of being 
their pastor for 2 2 years. 

Sister Akins was born in 1859 and died 
May 4, 1930. 

The funeral was conducted at the grave 
in the family grave yard near Rougemont, 
N. C, by the writer of this obituary in 
the presence of a large gathering of sor- 
rowing relatives and friends. She leaves 
6 children and 21 grandchildren, to- 
gether with her bereaved husband. The 
church lost one of its best and loved mem- 
bers, but we desire to humbly submit to 
God's will and pray his blessings on loved 
ones left behind. May they be blessed to 
sweetly submit and say, "God gave her. 
and took her home to Himself, blessed be 
His name. 

Humbly submitted by their pastor, 
J. A. HERNDON 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



255 



ELDER ISAAC JONES. 

Elder Isaac Jones died at his home, at 
Maple Hill, N. C, May the 4th. His fun- 
eial was attended by the following Elders, 
Gurganus, Pollard, Edwards, Brown and 
Roberts, all of whom paid sweet tribute 
to his memory, after which his body was 
tenderly laid to rest near the churc h where 
he had served a number of years, at Map.e 
Hill, N. C. Deceased was a noted Prim ; - 
tive Baptist minister, in his own state and 
in many others, where he had traveled and 
preached. He made friends wherever he 
was known, because ol' his affable dispo- 
sition, and firmness of the doctrine he had 
adocated and preached more than sixty 
years. His worth can never be expressed, 
both in his home, and whereever he was 
known. He was 84 years of age, on the 
17113 of last February, and is survived by 
his present wife, who before her marriage 
was Miss Sallie Bennett, of Reidsville, N. 
C. He was twice married before, by 
whom were left 11 children to mourn the 
loss of a devoted husband and father. 

Now, may He who has ever promised to 
be a husband to the widow, and a Father 
to the fatherless, be with and sustain them 
through this sad dispensation of His will. 

Mr. Gold, I am sending the enclosed. 
You can put in your valued paper if you 
think it worthwhile, if not return to me. 
I'd be glad if you too would add something 
to this, if you feel to do so. Pray for me, 
if you can have a mind. 

Mrs. Isaac Jones. 



IN MEMORIAM 

In memory and respect of our a^ed 
Bre. hren, Elder L. H. Hardy and Isaac 
Jor.es who have passed away. 

Elder L. H. Hardy served our church 
for seventeen years until he left these up- 
per counties. Brother Hardy was a 
faithful pastor. The weather was never 
too rough to prevent his going to his ap- 
pointments if possible to get there. Lie 
was an able minister, well established in 
the gospel truth. He was a good disci- 
plinarian. We felt that he was a sate 
guide in our church order. He was a great 
instructor and teacher of the writer in 
chinch business, in his younger days as 
well as in older age. He was well vi rs> d 
in church matters and in knowledge of 
business, and his death caused a feeling 
of great loss to us. 

When the Country Line Association di- 
vided for convenience in 1906 because it 
was so large, Brother L. H. Hardy drew up 
tha articles of faith which were adopted by 
tho Upper Country Line Association. When 
it was organized in 1907 before they were 
presented to the association they were ap- 
proved by our oldest minister, Elder F. L. 
Oakley who had been in the ministry for 
more than fifty years. He said he had 
no objection to them. 

We feel that our loss also has been great 
in the death of our brother, Elder Isaac 



Jones, who visited our churches and 
Country Line Associations for fifty years. 
He was an able, gifted and acceptable min- 
ister and preached to the comfort of many 
of our people. Since Brother L. H. Hardy 
lei f us we have been blessed to have our 
Brother Elder B. F. McKinney to serve us 
as pastor who preaches the same doctrine 
that Elders Hardy, Jones and Oakley 
preached those many years in the past. 

Resolved, first: That we bow in humble 
submision to an all wise God who doeth 
all things well. 

Resolved, Second: A copy of these reso- 
lutions appear in Zion's Landmark and 
also in the Lone Pilgrim. 

Done by order of the- church at Prospect 
Hit'., on Saturday before the fourth Sun- 
day in May, 1930. 

Elder B. F. McKinney, Mod. 
W. D. Blalock, Clerk. 



Mc. G. TAYLOR 

It becomes our sad duty to comply with 
the request of writing an obituary notice 
of our dear Brother Mc. G. Taylor. He 
was the second son of the late Eli Taylor 
and his beloved wife Virginia Taylor. He 
was born July 16, 1876, died March 1st, 
1930. On January 6th, 190 4 he married 
Bettie Jones. To this union were born 
three children. Two boys, one girl and his 
wife died July, 1918. On Dec. 16, 1919 
he was married to Chloe Bennette. To 
this union there were no children. 

He united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Bear Grass on Saturday before 
the third Sunday in Nov., 1920, baptized 
the following Sunday by Elder B. S. Cowan 
always filling his seat unless providential- 
ly hindered. He had been in declining 
health for several years having had several 
strokes of paralysis, but his death came 
as a complete shock. While sitting at the 
supper table he had a stroke and passed 
away within a few hours. 

Elders J. N. Rogerson and B. S. Cowan 
conducted the funeral services and he was 
laid to rest in the family burying ground 
where his body awaits the resurrection of 
the blessed. May the Lord be merciful to 
the bereaved family and help them to say 
as one of old, the Lord giveth and the 
Lord taketh away. Blessed be the name 
of the Lord. 

Done by order of Conference Saturday 
before the third Sunday in March, 1930. 

J. N. Rogerson, Moderator, 
W. S. Peel, 
A. B. Ayers, 

Committee 



IN MEMORY OF MRS. WICKHAM 
Alleghany Springs, Va. 

Mary A. (Poff) Wickham, daughter of 
William J. and Mary A. Poff was born in 
Floyd County, Dec. 9th., 1880 and depart- 
ed this world March 9, 1930, being 49 
years and 3 months old. 

She was married to C. O. Wickham Feb, 



256 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



5, 1902, with whom she lived happily until 
her death. She professed religion of the 
Primitive Baptist church and was baptized 
early in her married life ; in which she 
lived a consistant member until her death. 

The death of Mrs. Wickham was attrib- 
uted to complication of diseases following 
influenia. She suffered two weeks at 
home and three days at Jefferson hospital. 
She had all medical, surgical and nursing 
attention given her, that could be render- 
ed by physicians and loved ones. She 
never murmured or complained once of 
her affliction, but always smiled and 
showed appreciation for all we could do 
for ker comfort. So very ill she was, but 
never too sick to ask about the welfare of 
others, and say smiling, "I wish I could 
do ROMiething for them." A true mother 
she was, not only to her own children but 
her good influence over the young boys 
and girls of her community. "None knew 
her but to love her." 

I shall never forget the night just a few 
days before she passed from this world of 
storm amd tempest to an unbroken calm, 
how she held my hand and talked so beau- 
tifully of going home to live with Jesus. 
Thi» assurance we had by looking on her 
sweet, peaceful face the last time here. 
Gone but not forgotten we say: she will 
live in our hearts every day, we can only 
say, "Thy Will be done." 

She leaves to mourn her death a devoted 
husband, two daughters, eight sons, one 
grand-daughter, eight brothers, and a host 
of other relatives and friends. 

Though she will be greatly missed in the 
home by all, yet it is comforting to know 
that her suffering is over . 

May this "crossing over" of mother be 
but the means of drawing each member of 
the family into closer relationship with 
mother's God and make Heaven seem 
nearer than ever before. 

The funeral services were conducted at 
"Laurel Creek," by Elders H. V. Cole, S. L. 
Moraa, and Harlie Cummins, and inter- 
ment was made there, at Kyle Coles. 
"Asleep In Jesus." 

The esteem in which she was held was 
partly attested by the extra large crowd 
attending her funeral, and the beautiful 
floral tributes placed upon her grave. 

We pray that God's richest blessings to 
rest apon each member of the family. May 
Hia grace sustain them in their lonely 
hours. 

Day by day we saw her as a 

Star, slowly sinking away, 
And yet in our hearts we so often prayed, 

Taat she might longer stay. 

Shine on dear mother, thou art at rest, 

And shall forever be, 
You could not stay on earth with us, 

But we can come to thee. 

Lonely the house, and sad the hour 

Since you, the star of our home has 
gone, 



But oh! a higher home than ours 
In heaven is now thine own. 

"Thus star by star declines, 

Till all are passed away, 
As morning high and higher shines 

To a pure and perfect day! 
Nor sink those stars in empty night, 
They hide themselevs in Heaven's pure 
light." 

Her nurse, who loved her, 

Hattie Lewey, 

Shawsville, Virginia. 



WILLIAM HENRY ADAMS 

Brother Adams was born October 26th., 
1S41 and departed this life September 30, 
1928, making his stay on earth 87 years, 
11 months, and 4 days. 

He was never married but is survived 
by three sisters, Mrs. Nancy I. Denning of 
Fuquay Springs, N. C, Mrs. Ella Wilson, 
and Mrs. Emily Young, of Lillington, N. C. 
He was a brother of the late Eld. J. E. 
Adams of Angier, N. C, who departed this 
life a few years ago. Bro. Adams united 
with the Primitive Baptist Church at An- 
gier May 3, 1914 and was baptized by Eld. 
J. Frank Farmer, of Wilson, N. C, who 
was his pastor. Bro. Adams was a good 
man. He bore good fruit. A tree is to 
be known by the fruit it bears. To know 
him was to love him for Christ's sake. He 
was held in high esteem by his breathren 
and friends. 

He was laid to rest in the cemetery at 
Angier, N. C, and his funeral was conduct- 
ed by Eld. O. S. Young, his pastor. 

Done by order of the church in confer- 
ence. 

Eld. O. S. Young, Mod. 
M. E. Fish, Church Clerk. 



RECORDS OF SACRED HYMNS. 

Dunlap — My God, the spring of all my 
joys. 

Bottomley — My Christian friends in 
bonds of love, 

Sung and played by Eld. Golden P. 
Harris. 

This is not a cheap record. It is guar- 
anteed to last as long as any on the mar- 
ket. 

If you like this record and want other 
Baptist songs made on records please 
write me at once which hymns you like 
best. 

Price $1.00 each or 6 for $5.00 postpaid. 
See your friends and get yours free. Make 
check or money order payable to 

Harris Record Co., 
tf. Indian Valley, Va. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

= r ~ .== AT .. - -E^E^ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIII. JULY 15, 1930 No. 17 



GOD IS PATIENT WITH ELIJAH. 

And he said I have been very jealous for the Lord God of hosts: for 
the children of Israel have forsaken thy covenant, thrown down thine 
altars, and slain thy prophets with the sword; and I even I only am left; 
and they seek my life to take it away. 

And he said, go forth and stand upon the mount before the Lord. And 
behold, the Lord passed by, and a strong wind rent the mountains, arid 
brake in pieces the rocks before the Lord; but the Lord was not in the 
wind: and after the wind the earthquake; but the Lord was not in the 
earthquake: And after the earthquake a fire; but the Lord was not in 
the fire: and after the fire a still small voice. 

And it was, when Elijah heard it he wrapped his face in his mantle and 
went out, and stood in the entering in of the cave. And behold, there 
came a voice unto him, and said, What doest thou here Elijah? 

And he said, I have been very jealous for the Lord God of hosts: be- 
cause the children of Israel have forsaken thy covenant, thrown down 
thine altars, and slain thy prophets with the sword; and I even I only am 
left; and they seek my life to take it away. — 1 Kings, 19:10-15. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



— fig 

THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiolied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 



Wilson, N. C. 



Zton'e SLanbmarfc 

9epotet> to tbe Cause of 5esus Cbdst 



IN RIGHTEOUSNESS SHALT 
THOU BE ESTABLISHED. 

Dear Brother Denny: 

Remembering former days, when 
some of my letters found their way 
into the columns of the Landmark, 
and your recent invitation to write 
again, I have a mind to submit for 
the consideration of your readers 
some thoughts on the latter portion 
of the 54th chapter of Isaiah. The 
11th to the 18th verses, inclusive, 
read as follows: "O thou afflicted, 
tossed with tempest, and not com- 
forted, behold, I will lay thy stones 
with fair colors, and lay thy foun- 
dations with sapphires. And I will 
make thy windows of agates, and 
thy gates of carbuncles, and all thy 
borders of pleasant stones. And 
all thy children shall be taught of 
the Lord; and great shall be the 
peace of thy children. In right- 
eousness shalt thou be established: 
thou shalt be far from oppression ; 
for thou shalt not fear: and from 
terror; for it shall not come near 
thee. Behold, they shall surely 
gather together, but not by me: 
whosoever shall gather together 
against thee shall fall for thy sake. 
Behold, I have created the smith 
that bloweth the coals in the fire, 
and that bringeth forth an instru- 
ment for his work; and I have cre- 
ated the waster to destroy. No 
weapon that is formed against thee 
shall prosper; and every tongue 
that shall rise against thee in judg- 
ment thou shalt condemn. This is 



the heritage of the servants of the 
Lord, and their righteousness is of 
me, saith the Lord." To my mind, 
the prophet in the eleventh verse 
has reference to the Church under 
the Law. As such, she is, indeed, 
"afflicted, tossed with tempest, and 
not comforted." The demand of 
the Law strips her of everything and 
she is made to realize her naked- 
ness before a just and holy God. 
Her affliction with sin and her ut- 
ter inability to perform a single act 
that will commend her unto God 
makes her feel cut off, and without 
hope in the world. In that condi- 
tion she is tossed about with tem- 
pests; all of the Lord's billows are 
encompassing her and comfort is 
nowhere to be found. When she is 
made to give up in despair, the 
Lord speaks to her, saying, "Behold, 
I will lay thy stones with fair colors, 
and lay thy foundations with sap- 
phires." When Jacob journeyed 
alone to Padan-aram and night ov- 
ertook him, he lighted upon a cer- 
tain spot — there God gave him a vis- 
ion of the only way by which sin- 
ners could ascend into heaven. The 
ladder which reached from heaven 
to earth signified the coming of the 
only begotten and blessed Son of 
God into this sin-cursed world to 
open the channel through which 
mercy should run. Jacob later re- 
garded that place, or experience, 
as none other than the very gate of 
heaven, and he took the stones of 
that place and made for himself a 



258 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



pillow and lay down and slept. 
God's revelation to and his com- 
munion with him was a foundation 
upon which he could truly rest. 
The stones in our text can well sig- 
nify the experiences of the Lord's 
people — the times when he brings 
them by a way they knew not and 
makes known his goodness and 
mercy to them. 'Tis a heaven below, 
the Redeemer to know, and when 
he shows his smiling face to a poor 
sinner, the occasion is never for- 
gotten. Stones endure, perhaps, 
as nothing else the elements of the 
ages, and the subject of grace, once 
he is shown the way of life as it is 
in Christ Jesus, will cling to that 
hope as long as life shall last. Such 
an experience is an Ebenezer to 
which the child of God will often 
return in meditation and wish that 
it was with him as in the days that 
are past. Such leadings forth are 
of the Lord, therefore, it is said, "I 
will lay thy stones in fair colors." 
How good to realize as we journey 
along through life that an all-wise 
and omnipotent God is at the helm. 
He also says he will "lay thy foun- 
dations with sapphires." Sapphires 
are of different colors: blue, green, 
yellow, etc., and can truthfully de- 
note the attributes of our Lord as 
set forth in the Scriptures. Blue i 
significant of truth ; green of life, 
and yellow of pure gold tried in the 
fire. Paul told the Ephesian 
brethren, who by nature were afar 
off from God, but who being 
brought nigh by the blood of Christ, 
and therefore were no more stran- 
gers and foreigners, but fellow 
citizens with the saints, and of the 
household of God, that they were 
"built upon the foundation of the 
apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ 
himself being the chief corner 



stone." The doctrine of faith and 
hope as set forth by the prophets 
and apostles; of love and mercy of 
God as embodied in his Son, Jesus 
Christ, together with the leading 
forth of the soul by the Holy Spirit 
into these things, comprises the 
very foundation upon which the 
Christian's hope rests for peace 
with God in time and for eternity. 
Continuing, the text says, "And I 
will make thy windows of agates, 
and thy gates of carbuncles, and all 
thy borders of pleasant stones." An 
agate is a stone in which a great 
variety of colors appear, and the 
windows in the Church are those 
characters who discern and see and 
understand the doctrine of God our 
Saviour and the order of his house, 
with the various gifts who minister 
of the things of God to the flock. 
Carbuncles are blood-red; there- 
fore, the gates being of carbuncles 
signify that none shall enter into 
the celestial city except by the 
blood of a crucified Saviour. "And 
all thy borders of pleasant stones, 
"How wonderful when the Church 
can see and feel that she is a gar- 
den enclosed! It is declared that 
God shall be a wall of fire round 
about Zion, and when experiencing 
that sense of security which exists 
only in the Lord, and enjoying that 
peace which surpasses all under- 
standing, how pleasant are our bor- 
ders. These were precious stones 
and they set forth precious things. 
Then, it is declared, "And all thy 
children shall be taught of the 
Lord; and great shall be the peacp 
of thy children." This is good Old 
Baptist doctrine and it seems to set 
at naught all the works and ma- 
chinery of the so-called religious 
world in its efforts to bring souls 
to Christ. It is also evidence of the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



250 



Old School Baptist Church being 
the true Church. Men have pro- 
phesied for centuries that the 
Church built upon the faith of the 
Old School Baptist would soon 
crumble away and become extinct 
for lack of nourishment afforded 
through such mediums as the Sun- 
day School, Theological Seminaries, 
etc., for educating and bringing in 
the young, as well as maintaining 
the ministry. Notwithstanding 
there are no such nurseries or insti 
tutions to aid the Lord in His work 
in our ranks, the Church has stood 
for all ages and will withstand all 
the assaults in the ages that are to 
come, for the head of the church 
has declared that it is built upon 
the rock of revelation and that th- 
gates of hell shall not prevail 
against it. The Lord spake by the 
mouth of the prophet Jeremiah, 
saying, "Behold, the days come, 
saith the Lord, that I will make a 
new covenant with the house of 
Israel, and with the house of Judah : 
Not according to the covenant that 
I made with their fathers in the day 
that I took them by the hand 1 
bring them out of the land of 
Egypt; which my covenant they 
brake, although I was an husband 
unto them, saith the Lord: But this 
shall be the covenant that I will 
make with the house of Israel : 
After those days, saith the Lord, I 
will put my law in their inward 
parts, and write it in their hearts; 
and I will be their God, and they 
shall be my people. And they shall 
teach no more every man his neigh- 
bor, and every man his brother, 
saying, Know the Lord: for they 
shall know me, from the least of 
them unto the greatest of them 
saith the Lord: for I will forgive 
their iniquity, and I will remember 



their sin no more." He takes away 
the first, or Legal Covenant, that he 
might establish the second, or Cove- 
nant of Grace, under which cove- 
nant he writes his law in the in- 
ward parts and in their hearts, and 
thus he teaches them. What is the 
result of this teaching of the Lord? 
"And great shall be the peace of 
thy children." Words cannot be 
found to adequately express that 
peace which comes by and through 
our Lord Jesus Christ. Again, 
let us ask, What are some of the re- 
sults that follow this teaching of 
the Lord: "In righteousness shalt 
thou be established." This can 
only refer to the righteousness. 
That which the creature once 
thought to be righteousness has 
now become as filthy rags. The 
one taught of the Lord, then, is es- 
tablished in the fact that "Salva- 
tion is of the Lord," and he cannot 
be easily shaken. "Thou shalt be 
far from oppression ; for thou shalt 
not fear: and from terror, for it 
shall not come near thee." Can it 
be possible that this is spoken to 
the same character that was before 
said to be "afflicted, tossed with 
tempest, and not comforted?" Yes, 
it is the same character, but under 
entirely different conditions. The 
character has now been taught of 
the Lord and enabled to behold thr 
Lamb of God that taketh away the 
sin of the world. He is now estab- 
lished in the way of righteousness; 
he is no longer oppressed by the 
Law, for Christ has made him free 
from the law of sin and death, nei- 
ther does he fear or stand in terror* 
of the Law, because the truth has 
made him free and he is free, in- 
deed. There is none that is able to 
lay anything to the charge of God' ; 
elect now, for Christ has died, yea, 



260 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



rather is risen again and is now set 
down at the right hand of the Ma- 
jesty on high, for ever to make in- 
tercession for his people. Justice 
has been satisfied. This does not 
mean, however, that the children 
of God shall live in this world of sin 
and sorrow free from distress. Rath- 
er the opposite is true. In the world 
ye shall have tribulation, said the 
Master, and our text goes on to s? 1 
"Behold, they shall surely gather 
together, but not by me: whosoever 
shall gather together against thee 
shall fall for thy sake." As long a 
the world shall stand, men 
devils will combine in their assault? 
to overthrow the faith of the elect 
family of God and to destroy them 
from off the face of the earth, 
but vile internals, they can't pre- 
vail, for the text says they "shall 
fall." The next verse declares 
that the Lord has created the smith 
that bloweth the coals in the fire, 
and that bringeth forth an instru- 
ment for his work, and that he has 
created the waster to destroy. The 
work of the smith that bloweth the 
coals is necessary. The materials 
that go into the building of God 
must be tried, though as by fire, to 
shapen or fit them for his use. He 
knows what is necessary for each 
individual, and he must teach and 
instruct them in the things which 
are needful. This he does, nor 
does he leave it to others to do. He 
has made the waster to destroy, nor 
does this apply only to our enemies 
that are without, but to those that 
are within, which, after all, are our 
worst enemies. There is much 
dross, or flesh, about the most of us 
which has to be consumed, before 
we are made to walk softly and 
humbly before him. Truly, his judg- 



ments are unsearchable, and his 
ways past finding out. In the last 
verse, we are told, in effect, that 
nothing shall be able to separate us 
from the love of God which is in 
Christ Jesus our Lord, for he says, 
"No weapon that is formed against 
thee shall prosper: and every ton- 
gue that shall rise against thee in 
judgment thou shalt condemn. 
This is the heritage of the servants 
of the Lord, and their righteousness 
is of me, saith the Lord." Could 
the servants of God desire a rich^- 
or greater heritage than this? The 
God of heaven and earth, and al 1 
that in them is, is for them and with 
them, and, if God be for them, who 
can be against them? How consol- 
ing to those who are tried as was 
Job, to be assured that "no weapon 
that is formed against them shall 
prosper," and that "every tong"~ 
that shall rise against them in judg- 
ment, they shall condemn." The 
children of God, truly, have meat 
to eat that the world knows not of, 
and without exception, "their right- 
eousness is of me, saith the Lord." 
May the God of all grace and com- 
fort give each one to experience 
and understand these things for 
himself, that he may be rooted and 
grounded in the truth and establish- 
ed in the doctrine of him who is our 
Saviour, and not easily shaken and 
blown about by the winds of doc- 
trine of men, is the prayer of one 
who hopes he realizes that all his 
righteousness is of the Lord. 

In the bonds of Christian love 
and fellowship, I hope, 

R. LESTER DODSON. 
Rutherford, N. J. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



261 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Mr. J. D. Gold: 
Dear Sir: 

I am enclosing a letter from El- 
der J. T. Rowe of Baltimore, Md., 
which I think would be good mat- 
ter for the readers of the Land- 
mark. And with his consent I am 
asking you to publish it. 

I feel sure that many will read 
this letter and remember well some 
of the preachers he refers to, and 
it may be that some who may read 
Eld. Rowe's letter will remember 
very sweetly the time and place 
when one of those preachers fed 
their soul and possibly for the first 
time they ever heard the gospel 
preached to their understanding. 
The gospel when preached, does 
not impart life to the dead sinner 
but if one hears it preached to their 
comfort and understanding it's 
good proof that they have life and 
are living children of God. 

So the preacher is sent to feed 
the flock of God. The preacher 
cannot apply the preaching to any 
one, but the Holy Spirit does that 
and opens up the heart of their un- 
derstanding so they can say, "Well 
if that preacher is a child of God I 
must be one for he has told my feel- 
ings better than I can. Here is the 
Holy Spirit bearing witness with 
our spirit that we are the children 
of the most high God. And if chil- 
dren, heirs and joint heirs with 
Christ. 

Gospel preachers are gifted men. 
They preach Jesus a whole Saviour 
to His people and what He has done 
for them. For how can they hear 
without a preacher and how can 
they preach except they be sent. 
Sent of God who gives them the 
ability to preach His everlasting 

I 



gospel to his poor and afflicted peo- 
ple. Jesus said I will leave in the 
midst of thee an afflicted and poor 
people and they shall trust in the 
name of the Lord. Can you trust 
Him? If you can you are blessed, 
for it is written blessed is the man 
that trusts in the Lord and whose 
hope the Lord is. He is our hope. 
Submitted in love, 

A. B. DENSON. 
Rocky Mount, N. C, R. 4. 



The Letter. 

Elder A. B. Denson, 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
My Dear Brother in the Lord : 

I feel like I want you to know 
that I very much enjoyed your ar- 
ticle in the last issue of Zion's Land- 
mark. If the writers and preach- 
ers among our people would follow 
in that line we would have no cause 
for complaint. The few times it 
has been my privilege to hear you 
preach I have been favored to en- 
joy it, and I believe that you preach 
the same doctrine and in the same 
way, and by the same spirit as your 
late pastor, our much loved and de- 
pendable Elder P. D. Gold, and I 
happen to remember the ministry 
of eastern N. C. for several years 
back. I could name quite a list of 
preachers who were in the same 
class. Will name a few, Elders 
John S. Brinson, Archibald Jones, 
Bryan Whitford, T. B. Lancaster, 
D. A. Mewborn, Wm. Reynolds, 
Stephen Biggs, Albert Cartwright, 
Henry Peal, Levi Rogerson, G. D. 
Rogerson, M. T. Lawrence, S. Has- 
sell, and others who have gone to 
their eternal rest. They preached 
election, predestination, effectual 
calling and the perseverance 
through grace to glory and they 



262 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



told those who had a hope in Christ 
that it was their duty to follow 
Christ in Baptism, and walk in love, 
observing the ordinances of the 
church, and that in this love and 
sweet fellowship for each other 
they would be blessed, and find it 
more restful than in the ways of the 
world, and the churches lived in 
peace and prospered more than 
since we have so many man made 
phrases and extremes, which men 
who have grown wise above that 
which is written, call sound doc- 
trine, while many of the things they 
say were never said by any apostle 
of Jesus Christ. Sound doctrine 
does not consist in extreme expres- 
sions, but in that we have a thus 
saith the Lord for it. Able and 
profitable preaching is not that 
that is so mysterious but that which 
is in accord with the experience of 
the Lord's people. The fact that 
you look into the water and cannot 
see the bottom is not always proof 
that it is deep. The bottom may 
not be an inch away but you cannot 
see it because the water is so mud- 
dy. May God spare you long and 
bless you my brother to contend 
earnestly for the faith which was 
once delivered to the saints, 
have a nervous hand but hope you 
can read this. 

Yours in gospel bonds, 

JOSHUA T. ROWE, 
704 Deepdene Road, 
Baltimore, Md. 



HAVING GOOD MEETINGS 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir and Bro.: 

I am sending money order for 
two dollars ($2.00) to pay for Zion 
Landmark one year. Please send 



it to G. R. Shepherd, Catherine 
Lake, N. C, Route 1. We are hav- 
ing some good meetings and for 
such I desire to praise the Lord. I 
baptised my nephew yesterday. 

May the Lord continue to bless 
you is my prayer, 

Yours truly, 
E. F. Pollard, 
Jacksonville, N. C. 



A LOVELY BAND OF MEMBERS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

Enclosed find check for ($2.00) 
to pay for another year's subscrip- 
tion to Zion's Landmark, as my sub- 
scription expired in May. I have 
been reading the Landmark for a 
good many years and hope I can 
keep reading it. We have the 
Gospel preached to us every Sun- 
day and Saturday before in each 
month by Elder B. S. Cowin at Rob- 
ersonville, N. C. I think we have a 
lovely little band of members there. 
They are lovely to me, if I know 
anything about the Grace of God 
shed abroad in our hearts as it is 
they are all so much better than I. 
For if I am one of God's little ones 
surely I am the very smallest one. 
But I know it is by the Grace of 
God I am what I am, and if God is 
for us who can be against us. 

So many times I am filled with 
doubts and fears that God is not for 
me and yet I cling to that little 
hope that I would not change for 
anything that could be mentioned. 
Nothing in my hand I bring, simply 
to thy cross I cling. 

Mrs. S. H. Gurganus, 
Robersonville, N. C, Route 2. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



263 



Zion's Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIII. No. 17 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C. JULY 15, 1930 



'LET US REASON TOGETHER." 

Many times we become unreas- 
onable and dictatorial in our views 
on social, political and religious 
views, forgetting, for the moment, 
that we are unfair if we fail to ac- 
cord to others the right to think 
and speak their views, with the 
same frankness that we practice 
ourselves. 

"Come now, and let us reason to- 
gether saith the Lord; though your 
sins be as scarlet they shall be as 
white as snow; though they be red 
like crimson, they shall be as wool." 
— Isaiah 1:18. 

This and other kindred quota- 
tions show, conclusively, that it is 
sinners and only sinners that are 
cleansed by the blood of Jesus, and 
made white as snow in the blood of 



the Lamb. No other name is given 
under heaven whereby sinners can 
or must be saved. 

It is equally true, if we apply 
reason to the case, that Jesus came 
not to call the righteous; but to 
call sinners to repentance, there- 
fore; it is only sinners that can be 
saved, for if one is not in bondage 
to sin, then; Jesus cannot set such 
an one free from bondage to the 
law of sin and death. 

John saw, as revealed in Revela- 
tions, an innumerable host of saints, 
all giving thanks and praise to God 
for having redeemed them unto 
God and made them to reign as 
Kings and Priests unto God, forever 
and forever. 

We read the next verse, "If ye be 
willing and obedient, ye shall eat 
the good of the land; for if ye re- 
fuse and rebel ye shall be devoured 
with the sword; for the mouth of 
the Lord hath spoken it." This was 
spoken to Judah, a chosen people, 
and yet in such a state of rebellion, 
that the Prophet said to them. 
"Why should ye be stricken any 
more? (It does not bring them 
back) ye revolt more and more ; the 
whole head is sick, and the whole 
heart is faint." Is there not some 
good to be found in their service? 
No. "All their righteousness hath 
become as filthy rags, and all the 
goodliness of their flesh hath be- 
come as the flower of the field; the 
grass withereth, the flower fadeth 
and is no more, so is all the good- 
liness of the flesh." 

Are we better by nature than 
they? No. All have sinned and 
are, under the law, justly condemn- 
ed. How are we made to know 
that as sin hath reigned unto death, 
even so might grace reign through 



264 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



righteousness unto eternal life by 
Jesus Christ our Lord? 

Paul says. "I was alive without 
the law once; but when the com- 
mandment came, sin revived, and i 
died. And the commandment came, 
which was ordained to life, (The 
keeping of the law promises its 
blessings) but Paul says (this com- 
mandment ordained to life) I found 
to be unto death, for sin, taking oc- 
casion by the commandment, de- 
ceived me, and by it slew me." "O 
wretched man that I am! Who shall 
deliver me from the body of this 
death? I thank God through Jesus 
Christ our Lord. So then with my 
mind I serve the law of God; but 
with the flesh the law of sin." — 
Rom. 7th. Chapter. 

The Lord has promised salvation 
to his people, though sinful and re- 
bellious; through His atoning blood 
and righteousness. This is the 
foundation of our hope. Other 
foundation can no man lay, save the 
cleansing power of His blood and 
righteousness. 

Since none are perfect, save as 
they are made perfect in Him, the 
head of all things to the Church, as 
sinners saved by the blood, grace, 
mercy and ever living intercession 
for his people, may we not reason 
together about habits, order, cus- 
toms and doctrines, which more or 
less concern us all. 

Let us ever be mindful of our low 
estate, and try to be faithful over 
the few things committed unto us, 
not in a scolding or fault finding 
mood; but in humility striving to 
maintain the unity of the spirit in 
the bonds of peace. 

As ministers, we are servants and 
not masters or rulers over the 
churches. 



We will do well to heed Paul's 
admonition, "Take heed unto your- 
selves and to all the flock, over the 
which the Holy Ghost hath made 
you overseers, to feed the Church 
of God, which he hath purchased 
with His Own blood.— Acts 20:28. 

If we assume, or aspire to over- 
see all the flock, forgetting the ad- 
monition to take heed unto the 
flock, or over such part of it, as the 
Holy Ghost hath made you over- 
seers we are liable to become exalt- 
ed above measure, self important, 
self willed and selfish; self opinion- 
ated, vain, and may prove a burden 
rather than a comfort to the Church 
of God. 

The Shepherds of Israel became 
selfish and sought the fleece rather 
than the flock and God said, by the 
Prophet, "Ye eat the fat, and ye 
clothe you with the wool, ye kill 
them that are fed; and ye feed not 
the flock. The diseased have ye 
not strengthened, neither have ye 
healed them that are sick, neither 
have ye bound up that which was 
broken, neither have ye brought 
again that which was driven away, 
neither have ye sought that which 
was lost; What indeed have ye 
done? What does a law religion 
always do? "With force and cruel- 
ty, have ye ruled them, and they 
were scattered because there is no 
shepherd." 

"As I live saith the Lord God, 
surely because my flock became a 
prey, and my flock became meat to 
every beast of the field, because 
there was no shepherd, neither did 
my shepherds search after the 
flock; but the shepherds fed them- 
selves and fed not the flock." Ezek- 
iel 34th. chapter. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



265 



The Lord pronounced judgment 
against the shepherds of Israel; but 
left not the flock to perish, as 
strangers in a strange land; but, as 
the Good Shepherd, He, the Lord, 
brought them all safely to the fold, 
is yet leading His own and will lead 
them to the one fold, with its one 
Shepherd — the Lord Jesus Christ. 

In our reasoning we can but 
agree that the Lord will save His 
own, with an everlasting salvation. 

We often hear our ministers ac- 
cused of being jealous, and often 
unjustly so. The Bible says in one 
connection that jealousy is as cruel 
as the grave; but all jealousy is not 
cruel; but an evidence of £n abid- 
ing love. 

Solomon said jealousy is the rage 
of a man, therefore he will not 
spare in the day of vengeance. 
Prov. 6:34. Surely no man who 
loves his home or church, could be 
other than jealous, if the sanctity 
of the home or the order and pru- 
dence of the home or church was 
being endangered by outside inter- 
meddlers. 

A pastor, who has been unani- 
mously called to serve a church, has 
a right to be jealous of others who 
are disposed to encroach on the 
rights of pastor or people, bringing 
confusion to the Church, and he has 
a right to expect their attention on 
the services of the church and loy- 
alty of the membership, just as 
truly as they have a right to expect 
his faithful attendance and care, as 
an under shepherd or overseer. 

It is not right to call a man to 
serve a church, if at heart the mem- 
bership prefers the service, and pre- 
fers to aid and encourage almost 
any outside minister, who may come 
along; while, at the same time, 



their own minister is left without 
their hearty support. 

Paul, addressing his church at 
Corinth, said. "I would to God ye 
could bear with me a little in my 
folly; and indeed bear with me. 
(Not in word only; but in deed and 
in truth, not in my presence only 
and then criticise me in my absence 
and call me a jealous man.) 

For says Paul, "I am jealous over 
you with a godly jealousy; for I 
have espoused you to one husband, 
(The Lord Jesus Christ) that I may 
present you as a chaste virgin to 
Christ; For if he that cometh 
(among you) preaching another 
Jesus, whom we have not preached, 
or if ye received another spirit; 
which ye have not accepted, ye 
might well bear with him, For such 
are false apostles, deceitful work- 
ers, transforming themselves into 
apostles of Christ, and no marvel; 
for Satan himself is transformed in- 
to an angel of light." 2 Cor. 11th. 
Chapter. 

Not only should true pastors be 
jealous, as was Paul, of their char- 
ges; but each church should jeal- 
ously guard their own rights as in- 
dependent churches, and should no 
more tolerate an occasional inter- 
meddler in others churches' busi- 
ness, than should a well regulated 
home permit others in the commun- 
ity to intermeddle in the private af- 
fairs of the home. 

Many well regulated homes make 
a good community. All good gov- 
ernment rests upon good home 
government. Just so: many well 
regulated, orderly, independent 
churches make up good associations 
and a good, wholesome, general 
correspondence. 

Churches owe loyalty to them- 



2G(5 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



selves, and should refrain from be 
coming busy bodies in other church 
es' private affairs. We should try 
to apply the Golden Rule in all our 
church relations. First, take heed 
unto ourselves, secondly to feed the 
flock over the which God hath ap- 
pointed us as overseers, and thus be 
found attending to our own busi- 
ness and in doing as we are com 
manded to do, "Feed the Flock." 
We are not commanded to engage 
in the pastime of skinning goats, 
belittling those who do not agree 
with us, showing our inconsistency 
by telling the unconverted world, 
that "Ye have eyes and see not, ears 
and hear not, hearts and cannot un- 
derstand," unless you are born 
again, born not of the will of the 
flesh, nor of man; but born from 
above, born of God, and then pro- 
ceed to criticise and make sport of 
those who are to be pitied rather 
than censured. 

Homes may be small and poorly 
furnished; but where love abounds, 
they are homes indeed and so with 
our churches. Membership may be 
small and they may be poor in this 
world's goods; but where love is 
supreme and the spirit of the Good 
Shepherd is the ruling spirit, pas- 
tor and people are blest and become 
as a city set upon a hill that cannot 
be hid. Such a church is a bless- 
ing to any community and people. 

A little thought and care of 
Church properties and grounds, 
makes a good impression on all 
who pass by. We are too negli- 
gent, as a people, about such things. 
If our good sisters were once prop- 
erly interested in seeing that our 
church homes, though plain and un- 
pretentious, were made attractive 
by a little paint and the planting 



and care of hardy shrubbery, and 
a rose bush here and there, many of 
our church properties, instead of 
being cold and bare and neglected 
in appearance, could very easily 
and with little cost, be made attrac- 
tive. 

May we not earnestly endeavor to 
abide in our own calling, attend to 
our own affairs and not be among 
those who are too busy looking for 
and talking about the faults in other 
churches to look after their own 
households. 

This is not written as a heartless 
criticism; but in the hope that it 
may cause us to reflect and to do 
such things only as may be to the 
comfort and edification of the 
churches. 

Yours in hope, 

O. J. DENNY. 



HOPE DEFERRED MAKETH THE 
HEART SICK. 
Proverbs 13:12. 

But when the desire cometh, it is 
a tree of life. Hope is a compound 
word and is made up of expectation 
and desire. When once good is 
discovered and want of it felt, 
strong desire for the possession ex- 
cited, and the promise of attain- 
ment made on good grounds, hope 
presses forward to realize the 
blessing. Delay in the gratifica- 
tion pains the mind and continued 
delay makes the heart sick. But 
when the thing desired, hoped for, 
comes it is a tree of life. That is 
the cause of much joy and happi- 
ness in the possesison of the thing 
desired. This I understand to be 
the literal meaning of the above 
words. 

Now in a gospel or spiritual sense 
it must be found in the experience 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



267 



of the Lord's people, the Lord has 
given them a good hope through 
grace. 2 Thes. 2:10. A good hope 
consists not only in hoping for good 
things, but in having good reasons 
for hope. We are told that Abra- 
ham against hope believed in hope. 
That is when there were no grounds 
for hope from a fleshly standpoint, 
he still had hope because he deem- 
ed him faithful who had promised. 

He knew that God was able to 
fulfill his promise, that he was not 
dependent on the flesh to the very 
least degree. The prophets often 
as an assurance of the truth of their 
words, say, for the mouth of the 
Lord hath spoken it. The word of 
the Lord spoken in the hearts of 
his children is an assurance that all 
the world can neither give nor take 
away. 

Thy testimonies are wonderful. 
Therefore doth my soul keep them." 
Psalms 119:129. Therefore the 
Lord's people have a good hope not 
only for that life which is to come 
but for that which now is. Jesus 
said, I will not leave you comfort- 
less. I will come to you. So when- 
ever the child of God is in trouble 
he looks to Jesus for comfort and 
he always comes in his own time 
and way. He may seem to tarry as 
in Abraham's case, his hope was de- 
ferred, and his heart was so sick he 
said, "Lord God, what wilt thou 
give me, seeing I go childless." — 
Gen. 15:2. And yet Paul tells us 
that Abraham staggered not at the 
promise of God through unbelief. 
How like the child of God, now 
who in sorrow looks up to God. 
When hope of joy in the Holy Ghost 
is deferred, and with David says. 
Hath the Lord forgotten to be gra- 
cious, is His mercy clean gone for- 



ever. Yet like Abraham he hopes 
on because he deems him faithful 
that promised. Like Jacob, he 
wrestles as long as he can, and 
when he can keep up the struggle 
no longer, he says, I will not let thee 
go except thou bless me. Christ is 
in His people, and they are in Him, 
and so there can be no separation, 
faith and hope holds on despite ev- 
ery enemy and all power, for noth- 
ing can separate God's children 
from him. Though he slay me, yet 
will I trust in him, Job. There is 
nowhere else to go. I once heard a 
very dear old brother, who loved 
peace, say, we had trouble in our 
church until I got so sick and tired 
of it, that I said to myself I will tell 
the church to drop my name from 
their book, and so get out of it all, 
And then something said, where 
are you going? And then I looked 
all around and there was no where 
to go. So we see that he though 
sick at heart had to remain and 
hope on for the peace and fellow- 
ship that his soul loved, to come 
when the Lord was pleased to send 
it. It came and how happy he was. 
When the desire cometh it is a tree 
of life and it bears twelve manner 
of fruits. Rev. 22 chapter. Whom 
do we desire upon earth besides 
Jesus. The Word tells us that He 
is the desire of all nations. Yes in 
every nation, kindred and tongue 
He is the desire of His humble 
poor, and having Him they have 
with Him richly all things to enjoy, 
for whether in this life or that 
which is to come, Jesus is necessary 
to the joy of His people and when 
they can with joy meditate upon 
His goodness to the children of 
men, or see Jesus in His written 
word, or sing with the Spirit and 



268 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



with the understanding, or receive 
the preached gospel as food to the 
hungry soul, Christ is present. The 
desire of the heart has come and it 
is indeed a tree of life. The sick- 
ness is cured and like the lame man 
at the gate, can now not only stand, 
but walk, and leap and praise God. 
"As the apple tree among the trees 
of the wood, so is my beloved 
among the sons. I sat down under 
His shadow with great delight, and 
His fruit was sweet to my taste." 
There is no fruit so perfectly satis- 
fying. The apostle says, it is ex- 
ceeding abundant above all that 
we can ask or think, according to 
the power that worketh in us. Un- 
to him be glory in the church by 
Christ Jesus throughout all ages, 
world without end. Amen. Ephes. 
3:20-21. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE, 
Requested by Sister Effie H. Car- 
rawan. 



THIS IS THE WAY, WALK YE 
IN IT. 

"As ye have therefore received 
Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in 
him." Having been alone while in 
Richmond, for the past few days 
and having time to meditate, as I 
hope, on the goodness and mercy 
of our God I have been back to my 
childhood, where I hope God re- 
lieved me of my sins and revealed 
himself to me as my saviour and 
made me know that all power in 
heaven and earth was given into His 
hands and that all nations were but. 
a drop of the bucket in His sight. 

We are instructed, "As ye have 
therefore received Christ Jesus the 
Lord, so walk ye in Him." If not 
deceived I received Him in love and 
it has been my heart's desire and 



prayer to God that I might so live 
and act that not only my preaching 
would demonstrate this fact, but 
that my walk and conversation and 
dealings with my fellow man would 
show to the world I had been with 
the lowly Lamb of God, that taketh 
away the sin of the world. 

Having thus been taught, it is my 
desire and prayer to God that I may 
be blessed to go in and out before 
His people as an humble shepherd, 
testifying concerning what I hope 
the Lord has done for me whereof I 
am glad. 

Oh! that God's people every 
where would examine their own 
lives and search their own hearts 
and strive to walk in Him; for we 
know when we are criticising each 
other we haven't the mind of Christ. 

Let's try to be honest one with 
another and endeavor to look over 
each other for good and not for evil, 
thus eliminating strife, envy, hatred 
and law suits in the Church of the 
living God. 

May each one of us so live that 
when we come to the end of life's 
journey we can say with one of old: 
"I am now ready to be offered, and 
the time of my departure is at hand. 
I have fought a good fight, I have 
finished my course, I have kept the 
faith. Henceforth there is laid up 
for me a crown of righteousness, 
which the Lord, the righteous 
judge, shall give me at that day: 
and not me only, but unto all them 
that love His appearing." 

The sweetest day of my life was 
when I was released from the 
clutches of sin. Therefore I would 
like to live so as to magnify Him in 
my body and spirit which is thine 
and be blessed to die in the tri- 
umphs of the Lord Jesus. 

S. B. DENNY. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



269 



MARTHA ANN HOLLIDA 

By the request of the family I will at- 
tempt to write a brief sketch of the life 
and death of Sister Martha Ann Hollida. 
She was the daughter of Austin and Nancy 
Parisher. She was born July 9, 1854 and 
died May 23, 1930, making her stay on 
earth 75 years, 10 months and 14 days. 
She was married to T. F. Hollida on De- 
cember 30, 1876. To this union were 
born nine children, five boys and four 
girls, all now surviving her except one 
daughter — Mrs. Ella Moore — who preceded 
her to the grave some years ago. She 
united with the Primitive Baptist Church 
about fifty years ago and lived a faithful 
and consistent member to the end. She 
was loved and respected by all who knew 
her, and she and Brother Hollida pro- 
vided a home whose doors were ever open 
to the Primitive Baptists. They lived a 
good example of Christian love, and devo- 
tion to a great old age, he preceding her 
to the grave only about four months ago. 
They were devoted to each other and to 
their children, were good friends to those 
in need of love, sympathy or financial aid, 
so far as they were able, and will long be 
missed by their loved ones, church, and 
community. She was always a very in- 
dustrious woman toiling willingly for her 
household. Well might it be said of her, 
"She looketh well to the ways of her house- 
hold, and eateth not the bread of idleness. 
Her children rise up, and call her bless- 
ed, her husband also, and he praiseth her." 
Her nerves had been very bad for a num- 
ber of years and she had a growth over 
her eyes that impaired her eyesight gradu- 
ally until she became almost totally blind. 
She has not been able to see her way for 
the past few years. She seemed to have 
no fear of death, especially since the death 
of her husband. She seemed anxious to 
go with him and when the end came she 
peacefully fell asleep in Jesus, we believe, 
being sick only about thirty hours. She 
leaves eight children, Joseph, Durand, 
Tommy, Johnny, and Connie Hollida, Sis- 
ters Fanny Etheridge, Ann Eliza Alexan- 
der and Mrs. Lydia Phelps — thirty grand- 
children and eight great grandchildren, 
together with a host of relatives and 
friends to mourn their loss, but we believe 
their loss is her eternal gain. 

Therefore, we bow in humble submis- 
sion to the Divine Father who doeth all 
things well. Her funeral was conducted 
by Elder W. B. Harrington who spoke so 
beautifully and comforting to the- be- 
reaved, after which her remains were laid 
to rest in the churchyard at Bethlehem be- 
side her husband to await the resurrec- 
tion morn, when we hope to meet her 
again free from all her infirmities, there 
to dwell in the presence of the Lamb for- 
ever. 

Written by one who knew and loved her 
Sadie V. Barnes. 



MRS. VIRGINIA L. FINCH 

It is with a sad heart I attempt to write 
the obituary of my dear wife, Mrs. Vir- 
ginia L. Finch, who died March 28, 1929. 
She was born July 19, 186 6, making her 
stay on earth 63 years and about 8 months. 
She was the daughter of Mr. Mack Brant- 
ley and Mrs. Minerva Ann Brantley. She 
was a member of the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Sandy Grove, Nash County, 
N. C, for 27 years. 

She and the writer of this notice were 
united in matrimony January 7th, 1888, 
and to this union there were born eleven 
children, seven boys and four girls. Our 
third child died in infancy. 

I can say she was a person who loved 
her brethren and sisters and especially the 
ministers, when they came to see us. It 
seemed it was her delight to fix for them 
and wait upon them and it did not worry 
her at all. 

Her health began to fail about two 
years before she passed away. She was 
confined to her bed about a month before 
she died, but got up again, and was able to 
attend to her house duties by my assisting 
her, and on the 28th day of March, the 
day she died, she cooked dinner that day 
and ate as hearty as usual, and at 3:40 
she passed suddenly away sitting in her 
rocking chair. Her disease was heart 
failure, and oh my dear brethren and sis- 
ters, this poor writer will never be able to 
tell how he felt when he came in and saw 
the lifeless body sitting in the chair and 
could not speak to me again. "God have 
mercy upon me," was my cry. But I 
have all hope that she is with the people 
of God today. She was laid to rest in 
Nash County at the old Homestead on the 
30th day of March, 1929. Brethren 
please remember me when it is well with 
you. 

Yours with a little hope, 

J. W. FINCH, 

Middlesex, N. C. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

J. W. Joyner, our faithful and efficient 
treasurer, departed this life at his home 
in Nash County, N. C, April 14, 1930, age 
63 years, 9 month and 14 days. Brother 
Joyner joined the church at Sappony by 
the water side on the third Sunday in June 
19 25 and was baptized the same day and 
was a faithful member to every duty un- 
til his death. Brother Joyner served as 
Justice of the Peace as long as he would 
have it. He was married February 19, 
1891 and to this union were born six 
children; three daughters and three sons. 
The church at Sappony has sustained a 
great loss as he was one of its pillars; 
the community, a kind friend and neigh- 
bor and the county one of its most noble, 
and useful and worthy citizens. We deep- 
ly mourn our sad bereavement and desire 
to humbly bow in submission to the will 
of Him who is too good to be unkind; 



270 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



that we extend our heartfelt sympathy to 
his bereaved family and especially to the 
dear children and devoted wife and help- 
mate who so tenderly and faithfully 
cared for him during his suffering. May 
the dear Lord bless her and her children 
and may the children always remember 
their father's example and precepts and 
walk thereby. May we ever remember 
his counsel, instruction and example 
which was for peace, unity and brotherly 
love. The humble writer of this held the 
funeral services at the home of the de- 
ceased in the presence of a large number 
of sorrowing friends and relatives after 
which his remains were buried in the 
family cemetery. 

Be it resolved that these minutes be 
placed on the church book, a copy be sent 
to the family of the deceased and a copy 
be sent to Zion's Landmark. Written 
by his pastor in a precious hope. By or- 
der of the church in conference at Sap- 
pony, April 19, 1930. 

J. T. WILLIAMS 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

To our sistei filiza Hodges, the wife of 
Bio. John G. Hodges who preceded her to 
the grave by many years. She was in her 
97th year when the call to her eternal 
home came and from best information we 
can learn she has held a membership with 
the church at Black River for over 50 
years and as she was permitted by health 
to attend her church, she was faithful in 
doing so. Now be it resolved, 

First, that we the Church at Black River 
bow in humble submission to our God who 
doeth all things well. 

Second, that a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to Zion's Landmark and one to the 
Primitive Baptist paper for publication 
and one spread on our church minutes. 
May God who is able to keep us give us 
forgiving hearts to live in peace with one 
another. 

L. P. Jernigan, 
W. P. Griffin, 
J. H. Norris, 

Committee. 
G. O. Godwin, Church Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas it has blessed our heavenly 
father to call from our midst our dearly 
beloved brother and pastor Elder Isaac 
Jones, who departed this life on May 4th, 
1930, and, whereas we deeply and sadly 
mourn the loss of Brother Jones, but feel 
that our loss is his eternal gain, 

Therefore be it resolved: 

1st, That we bow in humble submission 
to the will of our heavenly Father, as we 
feel that He does all things well, being too 
just to err and too good to be unkind. May 
we be able to say "Not my will but thine 
be done." 

2nd, That a copy of these resolutions be 
written on our church book, a copy be sent 



to Zion's Landmark for publication, and 

a copy sent to the family. 

Done by order of the church at Cypress 

C'veek Saturday before second Sunday in 

May, 1930. 

Eld. R. W. Gurganus, Mod. 
Rudolph Bachelor, Clerk, 
Eld. E. F. Pollard, Committee. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

God in carrying out his divine decree 
hath removed from our midst our aged 
sister, Elizabeth J. Green, June 3rd, 1930. 
Sister Green was our oldest member and 
had been in feeble health for many years. 
She believed in the doctrine of salvation 
by grace, ever proclaiming that redemp- 
tion was the gift of God through and by 
the blood of Christ. In submission to the 
will of God, the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Smithwick's Creek does enact the fol- 
lowing resolutions: 

1st., That we desire to express publicly 
that the church will feel the loss of Sister 
Green, and we trust that her spirit is with 
Christ in paradise, and that her body is 
resting in the tomb to be resurrected by 
her Lord and Redeemer. 

2nd., That the clerk be requested to re- 
cord a copy of this resolution on the min- 
ute book and send a copy to Zion's Land- 
mark and a copy to the Enterprise for 
publication. Also a copy to' the family. 

Done by order of conference, Saturday, 
before the second Sunday in June 1930. 

H. F. Hutchins, Mod. 
A. D. Griffin, Sr., Clerk. 



STEPHEN BOOKER MURPHY 

In memory of my dear husband, Stephen 
Hooker Murphy, whom our Heavenly 
Father called to be with Him, on Novem- 
ber 5th, 1929. He was my devoted com- 
panion of 4 8 years. 

Were it not for faith to know that God 
knows best, and "doeth all things well," I 
would say Oh! God why did you take him 
from me. But I sorrow not as one that 
has no faith in his going for that is my 
greatest comfort now. To believe he is 
resting in the sweet paradise of God, 
waiting for me to join him, and my poor 
wounded heart will know no more sorrow 
or grief but we can forever be together in 
that home of peace and happiness. 

He was not a member of my church, 
(the Primitive Baptist) but he loved the 
members and always gave them and my 
pastors a hearty welcome in his home. He 
was converted at Greenfield Baptist church 
25 years ago, and was a faithful member 
and was faithful to help the unfortunate 
and needy in any way he could. 

Jesus called you dear husband, 
From this world of sin and woe, 
Your going makes us awful sad, 
But Jesus needed one more. 
Our home is sad without you, Book, 
But we know it was the best, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



271 



Because you suffered so much here, 

And now you are at rest. 

God in His wisdom has recalled 

The gift His love hath given, 

But we shall meet him soon, 

In the beautiful home in heaven. 

His devoted wife, 
Manervia Murphy, 
or Mrs. S. B. Murphy, 

Gretna, Va. 



ELDER SAMUEL McMILLON 

Death claimed Elder Samuel McMillon 
of High Point, N. C, Friday before the 
second Sunday in April 1930. Elder Mc- 
Millon had been in declining health for 
some years; but had continued his min- 
istry almost to the end. He was stricken 
on Monday while in Forest City, where he 
had gone for services and died away from 
home on Friday following. His funeral 
services were attended by a very large 
concourse of his brethren and friends. 



MOUNTAIN HOME PRIMITIVE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Dear Editor: 

Please state in your paper, The Zion's 
Landmark, other Baptist papers please 
copy: 

The "Mountain Home" Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at Asheville, N. C, wishes to 
extend a cordial invitation to all lovers of 
the truth who may desire to do so, to 
come and worship with us. We are of the 
Old Original Old School Primitive Baptist 
faith and practice. 

We are small in number, only seven 
members. 

Our meeting time is the fourth Sunday 
in each month and Saturday night before. 
We especialy extend an invitation to all 
travelling ministers of our faith and order 
passing this way to stop over with us. 

Route 4, Box 38, Phone No. 5348-M, 
Asheville, N. C. 

L. L. Huffman, Church Clerk. 
Asheville, N. C. 



MRS. STANLEY WINIFRED SPEIGHT. 

This beloved sister in the faith of 
Christ was born July 10, 1858 and reared 
in Pitt County, N. C, near Ayden and died 
December 6, 19 29. On September 21, 
1876 she was married to Josiah Bennett 
Speight and to this union were born six 
children, two sons, L. C. and M. O. 
Speight, and four daughters. Mrs. J. L. 
Whitfield, Mrs. Ernest McLawhorn, Mrs. 
C. C. Sumrell and Mrs. C. L. Tyson, Jr. 

She was the daughter of Stanley and 
Martha Carr Kittrell. She was a kind, 
devoted mother, a good Christian lady, 
highly esteemed by her many friends, es- 
pecially the brethren and sisters of Tyson's 
church whom she seemed to love so devot- 
edly, and served faithfully as long as she 
could. We miss her presence but feel 



that our loss is her eternal gain. 

May God comfort her bereaved family 
and guide them safely through life's jour- 
ney to that happy home above, where the 
wicked cease from troubling and the weary 
are at rest. Sister Speight was very 
modest and dignified in her youthful days. 
I was very fond of her. Her beloved hus- 
band, who was patient and faithful to her, 
preceded her to her grave, also her par- 
ents, sometime before she died. She 
lived with her children but died at her 
old home. They were faithful and lovely 
to her. The latter part of September, 
19 29, she was walking on the porch and 
fell, broke her right limb between her hip 
and knee, and bruised her face badly, but 
wasn't in much pain, she told me. I call- 
ed in to see her a little while and she 
seemed very glad to see me. She em- 
braced me in her arms and asked me to 
sing her a song. I did the best I could 
with the help of the family. 

Sister Speight was received into the 
sweet fellowship of Meadow Church on 
Saturday before the fourth Sunday in No- 
vember, 1889 and was baptised at once in 
a chair by Elder D. A. Mewborn and was 
given a letter of dismissal to join at Ty- 
son's for convenience in September 1899. 
She was a consistent member till death. 
Her suffering was intense for several 
years before she died, being bedridden 
from extreme nervousness. She had my 
sympathy. 

The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh 
away. Blessed be His Holy, Name. 

Written at the request of Tyson's 
Church. 

Mrs. Melissa Tyson. 



MRS. JOHN S. MEADOR. 

The death angel visited our home on the 
22nd of May and claimed our dear mo- 
ther for his own. Of course we should 
not complain since she often told us she 
had no fear beyond the grave, and had 
been spared us a goodly number of years. 
Sh^ was born February 4, 1S50, making 
her stay on earth 80 years, and a few 
months. She had been a member of the 
Pig River Baptist church 33 years. Her 
seat at church was seldom empty until the 
last few years when her health would not 
permit her to attend, and the church is 
not the only place. She never forgot the 
sick nor any that were in need. 

She was Sallie E. Fralin before her 
marriage in 1870 to John S. Meador. He 
preceded her to the grave in 1923. She 
leaves 2 daughters and two sons to mourn 
their loss. But our loss is her eternal 
gain. 

If you think this is worthy you may 
print it as a tribute to her memory. 
By her daughter, 

Mrs. D. H. Prillaman. 



272 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



MRS. PHEBA ANN LEE. 

Dear mother was called from time to 
eternity on March 6, 1930. The Gracious 
Giver of all good gifts who so wondrously 
blessed us with her precious presence, love 
and prayers to protect and comfort us 
through these many years; severed all 
earthly ties in the eighty first year of her 
faithful service and sacrifice. Mother 
was born in Sampson County on June 27, 
1849. Her parents were Houston and 
Sallie Frazier. She attended church at 
Seven Mile and Reedy Prong during the 
years of service by Elder Allen Whit- 
field, Jimmie Wilson, Louis Adams and 
many others. She enjoyed recalling their 
visits to their home and these memories 
were clearer and seemed more real to her 
than the present day affairs. Mother is 
remembered by all who knew her for her 
faithful industrious perservering disposi- 
tion and remarkable intelligence. She 
possessed unusual interest in history and 
geography and never got too old nor seem- 
ed too tired to desire to search to the 
depth of any worthy subject. She re- 
viewed history and geography with re- 
newed delight this winter. Sometimes 
being so interested as to forget bedtime, 
often calling my attention to scenes and 
events especially relating to Civil War 
times. She remembered the actuality of 
that dreadful period and did most of the 
corresponding for the parents of soldiers 
in her neighborhood. There were so 
many then that could not read or write, 
some days she would have to write several 
letters and make the envelopes. She made 
notes of many things as they came fresh 
to her mind. Coming along when she did 
she acquired a spirit of economy and 
thrift not excelled by many, if any. She 
was careful to be neatly attired and made 
her clothes to the very last and prepared 
the clothes she wanted put on her at the 
last some few years ago, with a note at- 
tached requesting a home made coffin, no 
show of flowers, all to be solemn and 
quiet. It is nearly three months since 
mother ceased to be with us. Tears blind 
my eyes as I realize I can no more do 
justice to her memory than I could prove 
my appreciation for one so deserving while 
she was with me. Mother was married 
in 1875 to Louis W. Lee of Johnston 
County, who departed this life on Febru- 
ary 15, 1915. They were parents of J. W. 
Lee, Rocky Mount, James W. Lee, Fayette- 
ville, Mrs. R. D. Langdon, Benson, L. R. 
Lee, Dunn and H. M. Lee, Rocky Mount, 
N. C. We were all blessed to be by them 
during their last days on earth. Mother 
endured much pain and affliction since 
childhood but her resolution never allowed 
her to give up long at a time. Neuritis 
finally sapped her vitality and age could 
stand no more. Mother read and studied 
the Scripture. The word of God was as 



the fountain of her soul, preferring to be 
alone many times to read and meditate on 
these precious truths. She united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church at Reedy 
Prong about 1873, was baptized by my 
grandfather, Elder James W. Lee and re- 
mained a faithful member for about fifty- 
seven years. Now mother is sleeping in 
the yard of the church she held so dear. 
When she was not present in body she was 
in spirit in prayer. Since father's death 
fifteen years ago mother has lived with 
me. My husband loved and respected her 
as his own mother and she considered him 
as her own son, which thought affords 
me more satisfaction than most anything 
I have to think of. She was always 
thoughtful and anxious about her children 
and often told me of lying awake at night 
communing with her Saviour, begging God 
to direct and keep her children from the 
traps and pitfalls of satan. May her in- 
fluence and prayers continue with us till 
we too must go the way of all the earth. 

Funeral service was held in the home 
by Elders Xure Lee and W. G. Turner. 
Elder L. A. Johnson made very appropriate 
and consoling remarks to a large crowd of 
relatives who gathered in the Reedy Prong 
Church yard to pay their last tribute of re- 
spect, where dear mother was laid to rest 
to await the resurrection morn. 

Words cannot express the sorrow 

And loneliness we feel, 
But 'tis God who has bereft us, 

He can all our sorrows heal. 

Her daughter, 

Clida Lee Langdon. 

Benson, N. C. 



ABBOTT'S CREEK UNION 
ASSOCIATION. 

The next session of the Abbott's Creek 
Union Primitive Baptist Association will 
convene with the church at Toms Creek, 
in Davidson County, North Carolina, on 
Saturday before the 4th Sunday in August 
1930. A cordial invitation is extended to 
our brethren and friends. The church is 
situated one mile north-east from Denton, 
N. C. Those coming from either North 
or South would come over highway No. 
109 to Denton. 

B. I. HARRISON, Church Clerk. 



CAUSES HEADACHES 

Eye srain often causes headache and 
nervousness. Our specialist is at your 
command. Hours 9 to 5. 

DENNY BROTHERS CO., 
S. B. Denny, Owner, 

Next to Post Office, 
Wilson, N. C. 

July 15, 4t. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

: at — -^r ---- " 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE or OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIII. AUGUST 1, 1930 No. 18 



GOD SETS ONE OVER AGAINST THE OTHER TO PUNISH ISRAEL. 

"And the Lord said unto Elijah, go, return on the way to the wilder- 
ness of Damascus: and when thou comest anoint Hazael to be king over 
Syria: 

And Jehu the son of Nimshi shalt thou anoint to be king over Israel: 
and Elisha the son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah shalt thou anoint to be 
prophet in thy room. 

And it shall come to pass, that him that escapeth the sword of Hazael 
shall Jehu slay: and him that escapeth the sword of Jehu shall Elisha 
slay. 

Yet I have left seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which have not 
bowed unto Baal, and every mouth which hath not kissed him. 

So he departed thence and found Elisha the son of Shaphat who was 
plowing with twelve yoke of oxen before him, and he with the twelfth: 
and Elijah passed by him, and cast his mantle upon him." 

— 1 Kings, 19:15-21. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



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THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 



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